Ismail, Or Ismail-Tutchkov, a town of Rou-mania, in Moldavia, situated on the Kilia, the N. arm of the Danube, 36 m. E. by S. of Ga-latz and 135 m. S. S. E. of Jassy; pop. in 1866, 20,869. It contains the remains of a fine Turkish palace, and many Greek and Armenian churches, and is an important seat of trade between Russia and Turkey. The new town of Tutchkov was added to it about 1830. Its commerce has been checked by the increasing business of Galatz, Braila, and Sulina, though the exports of grain, wool, tallow, and hides continue to be of some importance. - Ismail enjoyed great military and commercial prominence under the Turks, and contained 20 mosques and many khans, bazaars, and fine houses. The Russians took it in 1770, and stormed it again in 1790 under Suvaroff, when they lost 20,000 men, and put the Turkish garrison of 30,000 to the sword and nearly reduced the place to ashes. Having been partially rebuilt, the Russians again captured it in 1809. In 1812 it was formally ceded to Russia by the treaty of peace of Bucharest, and it was the strongest fortress of the Russian province of Bessarabia till 1856, when by the terms of the treaty of Paris the fortifications were razed and Ismail was restored to Turkey together with other parts of S. Bessarabia. It became a free port (tobacco and war material excepted) Jan. 1, 1873.

Isrnailia.

Isrnailia.