I. A Province Of Belgium

A Province Of Belgium, bounded N. by Brabant, N. E. by Liege, E. by Luxemburg, S. by France, and AV. by Hainaut; area, 1,413 sq. m.; pop. in 1872, 314,718. The principal rivers are the Mouse, Sambre, and Lesse. The surface is very much diversified, and the soil is in general fertile. Iron, lead, coal, and marble are mined. The province is divided into the arrondissements of Namur, Dinant, and Philippeville.

II. A City

A City, capital of the province, at the confluence of the Sambre and Meuse, 35 m. S. E. of Brussels; pop. in 1871, 25,600. It is the seat of a bishop, and has a cathedral, 16 other churches, a theological seminary, a royal Athenaeum, an academy of design, a conservatory of music, and two museums. The cathedral, a modern structure, is ornamented in front with 20 Corinthian columns, and beside the great altar stand colossal statues of the apostles Peter and Paul. The staple manufactures are cutlery, for which Namur is famous, and leather, which gives employment to one tenth of the population. The town was taken by Louis XIV. in 1692, and by William III. of England in 1695. The emperor Joseph II. demolished its fortifications, which in 1817 were restored by the lung of the Netherlands; but they were again ilemolished, except the citadel, in 1866.

Namur.

Namur.