Quince seed......... 2 drachms

Glycerine........... 1.5 ounces

Water.............. 1.5 ounces

Lead acetate........ 10 grains

Flavoring, sufficient. Macerate the quince seed in water, strain, add the glycerine and lead acetate, previously dissolved in sufficient water; flavor with jockey club or orange essence.

Cucumber Creams

I

White wax.......... 3 ounces

Spermaceti......... 3 ounces

Benzoinated lard. ... 8 ounces

Cucumbers......... 3 ounces

Melt together the wax, spermaceti, and lard, and infuse in the liquid the cucumbers previously grated. Allow to cool, stirring well; let stand a day, remelt, strain and again stir the "cream" until cold.

II

Benzoinated lard. ... 5 ounces

Suet............... 3 ounces

Cucumber juice..... 10 ounces

Proceed as in making cold cream.

Glycerine Creams

I

Oil of sweet almonds.......... 100 parts

White wax......... 13 parts

Glycerine, pure..... 25 parts

Add a sufficient quantity of any suitable perfume. Melt, on the water bath, the oil, wax, and glycerine together, remove and as the mass cools down add the perfume in sufficient quantity to make a creamy mass.

II

Quince seed....... 1 ounce

Boric acid......... 16 grains

Starch............ 1 ounce

Glycerine.......... 16 ounces

Carbolic acid...... 30 minims

Alcohol........... 12 ounces

Oil of lavender..... 30 minims

Oil of rose......... 10 drops

Extract of white rose 1 ounce Water enough to make 64 ounces Dissolve the boric acid in a quart of water and in this solution macerate the quince seed for 3 hours; then strain. Heat together the starch and the glycerine until the starch granules are broken, and mix with this the carbolic acid. Dissolve the oils and the extract of rose in the alcohol, and add to the quince-seed mucilage; then mix all together, strain, and add water enough to make the product weigh 64 ounces.

III

Glycerine.......... 1 ounce

Borax............. 2 drachms

Boracic acid....... 1 drachm

Oil rose geranium . . 30 drops Oil bitter almond. . . 15 drops

Milk.............. 1 gallon

Heat the milk until it curdles and allow it to stand 12 hours. Strain it through cheese cloth and allow it to stand again for 12 hours. Mix in the salts and glycerine and triturate in a mortar, finally adding the odors and coloring if wanted. The curdled milk must be entirely free from water to avoid separation. If the milk will not curdle fast enough the addition of 1 ounce of water ammonia to a gallon will hasten it. Take a gallon of milk, add 1 ounce ammonia water, heat (not boil), allow to stand 24 hours, and no trouble will be found in forming a good base for the cream.

IV

This is offered as a substitute for cucumber cream for toilet uses. Melt 15 parts, by weight, of gelatin in hot water containing 15 parts, by weight, of boracic acid as well as 150 parts, by weight, of glycerine; the total amount of water used should not exceed 300 parts, by weight. It may be perfumed or not.