[Fr., from L. corvus marinus, or sea-crow.] A sea-bird which greedily devours fish. It is about the size of a goose, and has a yellowish skin, which, hanging loosely under its bill, forms a wide pouch.

The legs are strong and black, and the webbed feet have one claw, indented like a saw. The cormorant is wont to fish with its head under water, and it has such a clear eye and dives so well that it is able to be under the waves till it catches its fish. Fish after fish will disappear into, the skinny pouch under the bill. It is said a cormorant can devour 4 lbs of fish a day, which is half its own weight. If a fish is too large to swallow, it will toss it up in the air, arid catching it again head foremost bolt it more easily. In China, the cormorant is trained to dive and catch fish, but a strap beneath its throat prevents it from swallowing it; each time the fish is taken from it, the bird returns to its work till the owner is satisfied.

Cormorant 59

Corn.. [AS.] In Scotland, applied to oats ; in the United States, to maize ; in England, to wheat; in Russia, to rye and barley. A collective name for the grains. The corn-producing grasses furnish excellent food for both man and beast. They contain a great deal of starch, and also a fair proportion of such flesh-formers as gluten and fibrin. Wheat and oats are superior as food to barley and rye, containing more flesh-forming matter and less water. Wheat is, as a rule, top expensive a food to give to cattle, but the bran, which consists of the outer coating of the grain of wheat, is a very useful food for cattle and horses. It is rather indigestible, and should first be scalded in boiling water. Oats and maize are largely used for animal food.

CORNSTARCH CORPUSCLES Seen under the Microscope

CORNSTARCH CORPUSCLES Seen under the Microscope