Wood-Cock, or Scolopax rusticola, L. a bird of passage, generally appearing in England to-ward the latter end of October, and retiring early in March. - It is about 14 inches in length, and, with expanded wings, 26 in breadth ; the crown of the head, hind-part of the neck, back, and coverts of the wings, are beautifully marked with ferruginous red, black, and grey colours; though the breast and belly are barred with numerous transverse lines of a dusky hue.

Wood-cocks, on their first arrival, take up their residence in copses of 9 or 10 years growth ; but seldom continue in one place longer than 12 or 15 days. They subsist on worms and insects, which their long bills enable them to extract from soft grounds, and moist woods. In the evening, these birds repair pa pools and springs, whence they retire to open fields and meadows, for the remainder of the night. The sportsman may, therefore, with advantage, take his stand in those narwoo row passes on the borders of woods, communicating with streams; or, he may watch these fowls about the close of the evening, near the pools which they frequent.

As an article of food, the woodcock affords, to the luxurious, one of the most delicious dishes: its flavour is considered superior to that of the Partridge.