2. What is the other form of trespass against personal property?

Page 78. 1. What are some of the principal defenses which may be set up against actions for trespass to personal property?

Page 79.

1. Who may bring an action for trespass to personal property?

Chapter VII

Page 81. 1. What are the principal classes of tortuous acts which are redressed under the action of trespass on the case?

Chapter VIII

Page 83.

1. What are the principal forms of indirect trespass?

2. Give a brief history of the doctrine of liability for injuries by animals or inanimate objects.

Page 84.

1. What is the rule as to liability for injuries by wild animals?

Page 85. 1. What is the rule as to liability for injuries by domestic animals?

Pages 86-87. 1. Give an outline of the case of Klemberg vs. Russell?

Page 88.

1. What is the rule as to the liability of owners or keepers of dogs for injuries caused by these animals?

Page 89.

1. When is a person liable for injuries caused by fire?

2. When is a person liable for injuries caused by explosives?

3. When is a person liable for injuries caused by accumulations of water?

Chapter IX

Page 91.

1. Distinguish between trespass, waste and nuisance?

2. What are the remedies for waste?

Page 92.

1. Define waste?

Page 93. 1. What constitutes waste?

Page 94.

1. Does the cutting down of trees constitute waste?

2. Does the working of mines constitute waste?

Page 95.

1. Will the erection of new buildings constitute waste?

Page 96.

1. Who may commit waste?

Page 97.

1. What is meant by the term "without impeachment of waste?"

2. What was decided in the "Raby's Castle" case?

Page 98.

1. Define nuisance.

2. Classify nuisances.

Page 99.

1. What are the principal classes of private nuisances?

Page 100.

1. . When may a person commit a nuisance by excavations on his own land?

2. What are the rights of persons owning land abutting on a running stream?

Page 101.

1. How may such rights be infringed?

Pages 101-104.

1. Give an outline of the case of Evans vs. Merri-weather?

Page 105.

1. What are surface waters?

2. What are the rights as to the use of surface waters?

3. What are the rights of landowners as to repelling surface waters?

Page 106. 1. What is the civil law rule on this question?

Page 107.

1. What is the common law rule on this question?

Page 108.

1. When will the pollution of water constitute a nuisance?

Page 109.

1. Name some nuisances which affect the enjoyment of property, without injuring the property itself?

2. Can a lawful trade or business constitute a nuisance?

Page 110.

1. Where may an obnoxious business be carried on?

Page 111.

1. What is the real test as to whether a noisy trade is a nuisance in a particular location?

Pages 112-113.

1. Give a few illustrations where a lawful business has been held a nuisance?

Page 114.

1. Give a few illustrations where a business has been decided not to be a nuisance?

Page 115.

1. May mere noise constitute a nuisance?

Page 116.

1. May the ringing of church bells constitute a nuisance?

Chapter X

Page 117.

1. Define deceit?

2. What are the five requisites in every action for deceit?

Page 118.

1. What forms may the misrepresentations take?

Pages 119-120.

I. What words are sufficient to constitute a misrepresentation?

Pages 121-122.

1. What acts or conduct of the party will constitute a misrepresentation?

Pages 123-124.

1. When will mere silence be sufficient to constitute a misrepresentation?

Pages 125-131

L. In what different ways may the requisite that the defendant must have known the falsity of his statement be satisfied?

Page 132.

1. Why is it necessary that the plaintiffs should have believed in the truth of the representations?

Pages 133-137.

1. Can the plaintiff recover when the misrepresentations were not made with the intention of having him act upon them?

Page 138.

1. Do misrepresentations by themselves constitute a ground of action?

2. What else is necessary?

Chapter XI

Page 139.

1. Define malicious prosecution.

2. What are the necessary elements in this action?

3. What must have been the character of the original action?

Pages 140 - 144.

1. Give an outline of the argument and decision in the case of Pope vs. Pollock.

Page 145.

1. What connection must the defendant have had with the original action?

Page 146.

1. When will an attorney be liable for malicious prosecution?

Page 147. 1. What termination of the original suit is necessary?

Page 148.

1. Is a dismissal of the original suit without a trial on its merits a termination upon which an action for malicious prosecution can be brought?

Page 149.

1. Is a termination by settlement or compromise such a termination?

Page 150.

1. What will constitute probable cause?

Page 151.

1. Is the innocense of the accused decisive of the action?

Page 152.

1. Define malice.

2. When will an action of tort for conspiracy lie?

Page 154.

1. In what classes of cases have civil actions for damages by conspiracies been sustained?

Chapter XII

Page 155. 1. Define Slander.

Page 156.

1. Define Libel.

Page 157. 1. What is meant by words being actionable per se?

Page 158.

1.. What are some of the most important forms in which defamatory words are to be found?

Page 159.

1. When are words imputing a crime actionable per se?

Page 160. 1. What is an infamous punishment?

Page 161.

1. What is publication?

2. What was the decision in Youmans vs. Smith?

Page 162.

1. Is the mere composition of a libel sufficient?

Page 163.

1. Does the dictation of a libel to a stenographer constitute publication?

Page 164.

1. Is the intent material in an action for slander or libel?

2. Is malice a necessary element in such actions?

3. To what extent is the truth of the charges a defense in such an action?

Page 165.

1. Is the fact that the defendant believed the charges to be true a defense in an action for slander or libel?

2. Is the bad character of the plaintiff a defense?

3. What are privileged communications?

4. What are the two classes of privileged communications?

Page 166. 1. What communications are absolutely privileged?

Pages 167-169.

1. To what extent are the statements, pleadings and arguments of a lawyer in a trial privileged?

Pages 170-171. 1. What classes of communications are quahfiedly privileged?

Chapter XIII

Page 173.

1. Is negligence a distinctive tort?

2. Are actions involving negligence relievable by an action of trespass or trespass on the case?

Page 174.

1. Define negligence.

2. Classify negligence.

Page 175.

1. What is the present tendency of the law relative to this classification?

2. Give a synopsis of the case of The Steamboat New York vs. King.

Page 176.

1. When is the question of negligence material in the field of trespass?

Page 177.

1. What was the early rule as to the liability of a person for the direct consequences of his acts?

2. What is the modern rule?

Pages 178-181. 1. Give a synopsis of the decision in the "Nitro-Glycerine Case".

Pages 182-183.

1. In what different ways may the duty, which is violated by an act of negligence, have arisen?

Page 184.

1. What is contributory negligence?

Page 185.

1. When is a person guilty of contributory negligence?

Pages 186 - 190.

1. What is the doctrine of comparative negligence?

2. In what States is it recognized?