The editor has consented to let me talk to you about advertising.

You know an advertising man's job and an editor's task are a good deal alike in one way - every outsider thinks he could do the job better. Writing stuff is such easy work any way, that most people take particular delight in criticising their morning paper - and the advertisements therein. Between you and me I think I could get out a better photographic magazine than - but perhaps I'd better not touch on that topic here.

In the minds of many people there's a misconception of what advertising really is - they look upon it as a rather hit or miss game and think that all publicity, no matter how achieved, is good. Some even go so far as to mistake notoriety for fame and forget that the ultimate end or business advertising is to sell goods.

I take it that I can pass over that first and last part of an advertising man's proposition - that to advertise profitably the first requisite is good goods. I know that all of you must be making and delivering good goods and that you expect to make them still better in future. Now, what do you want to accomplish by your advertising? Sell pictures. Right. As I look at it, there are two things that your advertising must do. First, it must make people want pictures, and, next, the desire for pictures having been created, it must convince them that the place to go for the pictures is your studio.

Why not keep them reminded that baby is growing up and that mother is growing old, that Susie will never graduate but once, and that John and Mary hope never to be married but once, and that there are many ages of man and woman and that in every one of them their friends and relatives are interested. And then tell them that you know how to make them feel at home, and tell them how you have all the new, good things in the way of up-to-dateness in your studio, whereby you can furnish pictures that their friends will really cherish.

But you've got to keep a-ding-ing and a-dinging and a-dinging, and, what's more, you are not going to be able to see what we advertising men call "visible returns." About a year ago a certain small merchant asked me to advise him about his local advertising. I said, "By all means use the newspapers and keep at it." He did, and I want to say for him that he published some very clever advertisements. A few weeks ago he complained to me that he could see no results. I said: "My dear fellow, do you expect people are going to form in line and come to your store and hand you $20.00 bills, with the remark, I saw your ad in the Herald'? "But let's have a look. His business in the goods advertised had doubled in the first six months of 1909, as compared with the corresponding period in 1908, though he had had live competition all the time. His advertising had paid him, and paid him well - but he did not know it. The truth is that people, nine times out of ten, don't know when they are responding to advertising. This is fortunate, for some of 'em are just contrary enough so that they wouldn't respond if they knew that they were acting on somebody's else suggestion. Create a demand for pictures and then persuade people that you are the man to make 'em. It's in letting the second condition overshadow the first that most of us are prone to be weak. Who is your competitor? The Smith Studio down the street? No. Your competitor is the jeweler, the bookseller, the music dealer, the confectioner, the theater, even the milliner. Your competitor is anybody who sells luxuries to the same people to whom you sell, or would like to sell photographs. The Robinson family has a surplus of $35.00 that's going to disappear into the channels of trade about Christmas time. If you want to get part of that $35.00 you must convince the Robinsons that it's a shame they haven't any pictures to send home to mother for Christmas; she would appreciate them so much more than she would a tidy for the parlor lamp. Getting people to wanting more pictures is far easier and far better for you than trying to drag business away from the Smith Studio.

From An Aristo Platino Print By Herman Heyn Omaha, Neb.

From An Aristo Platino Print By Herman Heyn Omaha, Neb.

From An Aristo Platino Print By Herman Heyn Omaha, Neb.

From An Aristo Platino Print By Herman Heyn Omaha, Neb.

And advertise the popular thing. I have intimate knowledge of a manufacturing business that, for several years, had been running behind to the tune of $100,000 a year. It spent a lot of money in advertising and spent it mostly trying to move off unpopular stuff. There came a change of management. The junk went under the boilers, the catchy, live stuff was advertised, and the new management showed a small profit the first six months, and inside of two years the profits were running a hundred thousand dollars per year.

But there's a heap of graft hidden behind the name of advertising. When you buy Hypo you expect to get l6 ounces to the pound. When you buy advertising, you ought to know what you are getting and what the market price is. I can give to you an illustration of how it goes in my line and point a finger of warning at the fake schemes, - though I'm going to admit right now that the advertising fakir often doesn't know he's a fakir. He's absolutely ignorant of the business.