Each curtain is to be cleaned in the same manner, and will take about 6 sheets to properly dry it; but with each fresh curtain the second soap liquor is to be used as the first, and a fresh lot mixed for the second liquor.

Moreens are to be cleaned, rinsed, and spirited, exactly as first described for damasks. When sent to the pressers, moreens may be finished in one of the four following ways, plain, watered, embossed, or with satin and watered stripes, the charge per yard being about the same for each method.

Cleaning Tabaret Or Tabbarea

This may be cleaned and finished in the same manner as described for silk damasks, excepting that when it is sent to the pressers it is to be watered instead of hot-pressed.

To clean with camphine: Have your board, brushes, and drying clothes all ready, and put 1/2 gal. camphine into each of 2 earthenware pans that will hold about 2 gal. each. Well shake and brush the curtains, take out the linings, and take them apart. Put one width into one of the pans of camphine; when it is quite soaked, take it out and lay it on your board, wrong side up, and well brush it with the camphine; turn it and treat the right side in the same manner. Now pass it again through the first liquor, and then through the second, letting it drain on a peg over the latter for a minute. When it has drained sufficiently, sheet it up dry with the cotton or linen cloths, then brush it with a dry brush, and hang it up to air and take off the smell of the camphine. Each width is to be cleaned in the same manner, using fresh camphine as often as necessary. When all have been dried, put them for a few minutes between some damp sheets, then take them out, brush and rub them, and send to the pressers to be watered.

Cleaning Satin

Have 2 clean stoneware pans that will hold about 2 gal. each, and into each pan put 2 qt. of camphine. Shake and well brush the curtains and take them apart. Put one width of the satin into one of the pans of camphine, let it well soak through, and then drain it on a peg over the pan for about a minute. Now put it on the board, the wrong side up, and well brush it with a soft brush, occasionally wetting the brush in the camphine. When the wrong side has been cleaned all over, turn the right side up, and clean it with the brush in the same manner; and afterwards pass it through the first liquor, and then through the second, and well drain it. Now turn your board the plain side up, lay the width on it, and well dry with the cloths. After it is dry, brush it, first on the wrong side and then on the right side, with a dry brush, and then hang it up to air and take off the smell of the camphine. Each width is to be cleaned in the same manner, using clean camphine as often as required. Satins are generally finished in the frame in the manner described for silk damasks, and afterwards sent to the calender.

Another very simple way is to slightly damp them between clean sheets, then brush them and send to the pressers to be finished.

-Satins may also be cleaned, dried, damped, brushed, framed, and finished, exactly as described for silk damasks.

Cleaning Tammy Lining

(1) Dissolve 1 bar of soap in 4 gal. boiling water; have 3 vessels, each containing 2 gal. cold water. Into the first of these put 2 gal., into the second 1 1/2 gal., and into the third 1 gal. of the dissolved soap. Tack the widths of lining together, end to end, and then put it into the first soap liquor, work it well in this, then put it into the second liquor, and again well work it. Now put it into the third liquor, handle it well in this, and afterwards put it on a clean peg to drain. Put 8 gal. cold water into a clean vessel, and stir into it one tablespoonful of oil of vitriol; handle the lining in this spirit water for 5 minutes, take it out and rinse it in one lot of cold water for about a minute. Now dry it, and when dry have it re-glazed on the wrong side. (2) Mix together the crumb of a stale loaf and a quart of silver sand, and damp the mixture with camphine. Put a dry width of the tammy on the scouring board, and well work this mixture into it, on both sides. Then shake it and brush it, and it is cleaned. Again damp the mixture of bread and sand with a little fresh camphine, and clean the next width in the same manner.

And so proceed for any number of widths. (3) Tammy lining may also be cleaned with camphine, in the manner directed for tabaret; but a flannel should be used to rub out the dirt instead of a brush.

When cleaned by either of these last two methods the tammy will not often require re-glazing, unless it was very dirty before cleaning. But whenever it is necessary to re-glaze it, it should be done on the wrong side.

Bullion Fringe and Worsted Fringe should be cleaned in the soap liquors, spirited, rinsed, and dried, exactly as directed for tammy lining. But if the fringe contains any spickets, that is, pieces of wood covered with silk, these must be taken off and cleaned with bread-crumbs and camphine, or, if necessary, sent to the fringe makers to be re-covered.

Bullion Lace and Gimp are to be cleaned in camphine and dried in cloths, piece by piece, in the manner directed for tabarets.

Silk curtains, when soiled, may be made to look as good as new by washing them in a liquid composed of 1/2 pint gin, 4 oz. soft-soap, 2 oz. strained honey, well mixed; spread the silk out on a table and apply the mixture with a sponge, rubbing thoroughly; then wash in soft water, into which there should be put 2 tablespoonfuls of oxgall to 3 gal. of water, rinse the silk, but do not wring it; hang it out smooth to dry, and iron when damp.

Cleaning Dresses - Silk

Have two earthenware vessels that will hold about 2 gal. each, and put 1/2 gal. of camphine into each of them. Take the sleeves off the dress, and the body off the skirt. Clean the body first, next the sleeves, and the skirt last. Put the body to soak in the first liquor, and when it is well wetted lay it on the board, and well brush it with the silk scouring brushes, first on the inside and afterwards on the outside. When this has been done, put it back into the first liquor, and then into the second, and let it drain on a peg o\er the latter for about a minute. Have a clean sheet spread out on the plain side of the board, take the body off the peg, and lay it smoothly on this and well rub it, with clean India-cotton cloths, until quite dry. The sleeve and the skirt are to be cleaned and dried in exactly the same manner. Hang in a hot room to take off the smell of the camphine.

This is a very quick and easy way to clean a silk dress. But if it should be very dirty it will be found to be much better to take it apart into widths, and to clean each width separately by either of the two following methods: - (1) Dissolve 2 lb. of soap in 2 gal. of boiling water, and use when cold. Have 4 pans, or other vessels, with 4 pails of cold water in each. Into one of these put a small quantity of the dissolved soap for a thin soap liquor, and in another dissolve 1/4 lb. of tartaric acid for spiriting. The other two lots of water are for rinsing Now begin and clean the dress as quickly as possible, for each width should not take more than 5 minutes from first to last, or it will probably be spoiled. Spread the width, wrong side upwards, on a clean scouring board which is rather longer and wider than a width of the dress. Pour over it sufficient of the dissolved soap to wet it thoroughly, and well brush it, lengthwise, with a soft brush; then turn it and treat the right side in the same way. When this has been done, pass it first through the thin soap liquor, then through the two rinsing waters, and afterwards well handle it in the spirit water, and then put it on a peg to drain.

Now spread a clean, dry sheet on a dry board or table, lay on it the width which you have just cleaned, and well dry it with clean cloths, and afterwards brush it with a dry brush. When all the widths have been cleaned and dried they should be finished either in a silk-finishing frame or on a French board. Silks or satins should never be brushed across the widths, as doing so causes them to fray out, and spoils them for re-making.

(2) Have 2 clean earthenware pans, which will hold about 2 gal. each, and put 1/2 gal. of camphine into each. Take one breadth of the dress and dip it into the first lot of camphine, then spread it on the board, dip the brush into the camphine, and brush the width as above directed. When this has been done, put it again into the first liquor, then into the second, and let it drain for a minute over the latter. Be sure to squeeze out as much of the camphine as possible before passing the width from one liquor to the other. Spread a clean sheet on the board, lay the breadth of silk on it, and dry thoroughly. And so proceed for any number of widths. Hang in a hot room to take off the smell of the camphine. Finish either in the frame or on the French board.

Satins may be cleaned by either of the methods given for cleaning silks.

Irish Poplins and Tabinets are to be cleaned with camphine, in the manner directed for Tabaret curtains.