Of the finished products for the year, 2,947,933 tons represent the amount of iron and steel formed into rails. If all this metal were rolled into a single rail of standard proportions, it would measure approximately 81 feet high, and would be about a mile and one-fifth long. The base would, of course, equal the height, and the tread would have a width of 43 feet. In our

Finished Products 183

Copyright, 1903, by Munn & Co.

Park Row Building.

Cut Nail.

Washington Monument.

Wire

Nail.

Eiffel Tower.

Proportion Of Finished Products Formed Into Wire Nails And Cut Nails.

illustration we have shown the relative proportions of a locomotive of average size placed on this rail.

Next in quantity to the iron and

Copyright, 1903, by Munn & Co. Proportion Of Finished Products Formed Into Plates And Sheets.

Copyright, 1903, by Munn & Co. Proportion Of Finished Products Formed Into Plates And Sheets.

steel rail production is last year's output of plates and sheets; 2,665,409 tons of metal were thus converted. This amount, if rolled into a single sheet of No. 30 standard gage, which is the thinnest sheet steel commercially used, would cover 420 square miles, or nearly twenty times the area of the island of Manhattan. The extent of this area is illustrated in the accompanying sketch plan of New York city and its vicinity.

The production of nails forms no small part of the finished products for the year. Wire nails represent, of course, a much larger part of the output. The totals are 10,982,246 100-pound kegs of wire nails and 1,633,762 100-pound kegs of cut nails. Following the method in our two previous comparisons, we have represented each amount by a single nail of standard proportions. The cut nail would tower far above the Park Row Building, measuring almost exactly the height of the Washington Monument, while the wire nail would rise to nearly double this height, overtopping the Eiffel Tower, and forming a solid column of metal 54 feet in diameter and 1,000 feet high.