Another kind of continuous apparatus of American manufacture is Robertson's Patent Automatic Carbon-ating Machine, manufactured by Wittemann Brothers, New York, and illustrated by the annexed cut.

This machine is constructed on the continuous principle, the water being taken by suction from a pump of any regular supply, and the gas from an ordinary gasometer, fed either by a generator or liquid gas cylinder. The supply of water is regulated by automatically working levers and valves, and the superfluous carbonic acid gas is blown back into the gasometer by a safety-valve which is constructed to operate and control the pressure in this apparatus. The impregnation of the water with the carbonic acid is obtained by passing both through one or several spray impregnators that are based on the same ideas as those described on another page, differing however in construction, as illustrated by the appended sectional view. Thus impregnation by agitation is done away with. The water is discharged fully impregnated from the last impregnator into the receiver or cylinder, which is constructed to automatically swing on a knife-edge balance; thus, when the receiver or cylinder becomes filled with charged water to the amount set sufficient to overcome the weight on the balance lever, the receiver or cylinder falls far enough to rest upon and close the stop valve in the water supply pipe, thus shutting off the water supply to the pump; the latter then pumps gas only, which again escapes back into the gasometer through the safety-valve on the receiver or cylinder. This safety-valve is constructed to operate and control the pressure at any given point and to blow back the surplus gas, and is inclosed in a cylinder allowing no waste. Also, the amount of water in the receiver and the pressure required is maintained, uniformly and automatically, whenever the bottler or dispenser is not drawing from the machine. Immediately upon taking any of the carbonated water from the machine, the receiver will become lighter, and raise by means of the balance, thus opening the stop valve in the water-supply pipe to the pump, which will again pump water enough to supply the demand or deficiency.

Fig. 133.   Robertson's Automatic Carbonator with Generator and Gasometer

Fig. 133. - Robertson's Automatic Carbonator with Generator and Gasometer.

Fig. 134.   Sectional View of the Spray Impregnators as shown in Fig. 133

Fig. 134. - Sectional View of the Spray Impregnators as shown in Fig. 133.

Another continuous apparatus manufactured by the same firm is described in the following matter and cut: