1. Softening of the fiber by long-continued low temperature with a supply of water present.

A. Fowler, Photographer.

A. Fowler, Photographer.

Fig. 38. - 100-Calorie portions of starches and cereals.

No

Kind

Weight of Portion ounces

.

1.

Shredded Wheat . .

.... 1.0

2.

Cornmeal ................

..... 1.0

3.

Farina ....................

......1.0

4.

Rice ......................

.... 1.0

5.

Tapioca ................

.... 1.0

6.

Cornstarch ..............

.... 1.0

No.

Kind

Weight oF Portion

OUNCE8

7.

Hominy Grits ............

. ... 1.0

8.

Rolled Oats ....

. ... 1.0

9.

Flaked Wheat . . .

. ... 1.0

10.

Corn Flakes .................

. ... 1.0

11.

Puffed Wheat . . .

. ... 1.0

12.

Puffed Rice ....

. ... 1.0

2. Complete opening of the starch granules by the boiling temperature of water.

3. The protein present presents no special problem. Its digestibility is not especially affected, but the softening of the fiber of the cereal makes the protein available to us.

Methods

There are two classes into which the cereals may be divided, - the flaked and the granular. The weighing experiments (page 62) show that the granular is the heavier. This means that more water will be absorbed by a given measure of the granular, because it contains more material.

In experimenting with a cereal at home it is well to try the proportion of water and cereal printed on the box the first time, altering the proportion if the first result is not satisfactory. There should be enough water to soften the cereal, and only just enough. If the cooked cereal is stiff, the measure of water is short; if so thin that the cereal runs on the plate, too much water was allowed.