Floral Designs in German Applique - An Ivy Handkerchief Sachet - An Effective "Wreath of Pansies - Name Flowers as Decorations - The Name-flower Plaque - Black as an Effective Background

The rapidity with which objects decorated by means of German applique can be successfully achieved is a great point in its favour, especially in these days, when we all seem to live at high pressure.

The very varied nature of the work also adds to its fascination, while the fact that the worker may go direct to Nature for inspiration and design removes many difficulties from her path.

It was not even necessary to go out of doors to obtain the motif for the original handkerchief sachet illustrated. A few sprays of the ivy climbing around the window furnished excellent models for this simple yet effective design. Suitable leaves in three or four sizes were selected, laid flat on stiff paper, and the outline drawn around them with a lead pencil. These paper patterns were cut out, laid in turn on thick, smooth cloth in shades of green, and the leaves quickly cut out with sharp scissors by their aid. These paper patterns may be kept and used again and again.

The leaves were next arranged as naturally as possible on a piece of cream-coloured cloth, and lightly gummed in place. Stems were then sketched in, and worked in pale greenish brown embroidery thread. The veinings of the leaves served to hold them in place, and were worked in silks of a lighter shade than the leaves. A tiny bunch of green ivy berries was not forgotten, composed of French knots. The sachet was lined with mauve silk and edged with cord of the same colour. When open it measures 16 inches by 7 inches, which is a very useful size.

A handkerchief sachet with an ivy leaf design is charming, lined with soft silk and finished with a silk cord

A handkerchief sachet with an ivy leaf design is charming, lined with soft silk and finished with a silk cord

Full size pansies showing details of working. Cut out in a fine faced cloth a very natural effect is given to the flowers

Full-size pansies showing details of working. Cut out in a fine faced cloth a very natural effect is given to the flowers

Originality Of Design

A wreath of pansies (the blossoms alone, with no leaves or stems whatever) is an extremely striking design, and one that is adaptable to many purposes, such as the lid of a round box, the back of a blotter, or a photo-graph frame. The latter is illustrated with a diagram of the pansies. All the flowers composing the wreath can be cut from this pattern, as, in the cutting out, little variations in shape and size can easily be con-trived. The different colours employed do away with any idea of monotony, and the formation of the flower is usually the same - viz., two large petals at the back, and three, generally of a lighter or contrasting shade, in front. This design is handsome when velvet is used for the flowers. The edges in this case must be outlined with the pyro-graphic point (as described in a previous article, Vol. 7, page 4436). to prevent them from fraying. Shades of mauve, from faintest lavender to rich purple, look de lightful on a pale grey or green background. Here and there a pansy entirely of the deepest shade, with a touch of yellow silk in the centre, serves to accentuate the design, and throws into relief the more delicate petals of mauve and creamy white.

Another appropriate colour scheme runs through the scale of yellows, pale primrose, lemon, orange, gold, on to tawny brown and chestnut shades. Indeed, one has only to go to Nature for endless suggestions of unfailing harmony.

Diagram showing the separate parts of the heartsease blossom. Cut these out in paper and lay on the material, cutting neatly round with very sharp scissors. Each pansy should be made up on a tiny piece of stiff muslin

Diagram showing the separate parts of the heartsease blossom. Cut these out in paper and lay on the material, cutting neatly round with very sharp scissors. Each pansy should be made up on a tiny piece of stiff muslin

Pansy blossoms arranged closely together without foliage form an artistic decoration for a photograph frame

Pansy blossoms arranged closely together without foliage form an artistic decoration for a photograph frame

Each pansy is made up separately, on a tiny piece of stiff lining muslin. First the back petals are stitched on, by the base, then the front ones, partially covering them, and finally a few stitches of silk are added to suggest the flecks and markings so characteristic of this popular flower. If secured to the background by a touch of paste and a stitch or two of yellow silk, through the heart of the blossoms, the petals will stand out loosely in a highly natural manner Flowers of the Poets

It is a growing custom, and a very pleasing one, for girls who own flowers as namesakes - Rose, Lily, Marguerite, May, Violet, Ivy, and so on - to embroider their own particular name-flower upon their dainty personal belongings and dress accessories.

It is now possible to obtain round plaques in varying sizes, from tiny ones four inches in diameter to those measuring ten or twelve inches, composed of art linen, mounted in circular frames of dull oak or rosewood. They are fitted with cords for hanging, and make charming decorations for a girl's bedroom or study, when embroidered with a spray of flowers. The lining at the back can be removed while the work is being accomplished, and replaced when it is completed. The great advantage of these novel plaques is that the material is stretched tightly in the frame, so that the embroidery or applique work is rendered easy of accomplishment.

Some like to work the flower appropriate to the month in which their birthday falls - daffodils for March, primroses for April, and so on - or favourite blossoms are selected, and mottoes or quotations from the poets embroidered to lend an added interest.

Flowers are lovely. Love is flower-like; Friendship is a sheltering tree is a quotation that is not hackneyed, and one eminently suitable for a gift to a friend; while it is only necessary to turn to the pages of Shakespeare, Shelley, Tennyson, or Christina Rossetti to find numerous appropriate examples.

A plaque, similar to those described, is illustrated. It has a wild-rose design in German applique upon a foundation of green Harris linen. Black as a Background

Apple blossom in pale pink velvet, and leaves in soft green, appliqued on art green linen and mounted in plaque form, is delightfully decorative

Apple blossom in pale pink velvet, and leaves in soft green, appliqued on art green linen and mounted in plaque form, is delightfully decorative

Marguerites or ox eyed daisies are particularly effective in applique on black satin; pale mauve ribbon studded with beads connects the flowers

Marguerites or ox-eyed daisies are particularly effective in applique on black satin; pale mauve ribbon studded with beads connects the flowers

The modern fashion of introducing black as the keynote in decorative schemes has much to recommend it. This sombre hue enhances by contrast all bright colours introduced into its vicinity, and frequently forms the groundwork of cretonnes, damasks, brocades, and chintzes. The effect is undoubtedly rich, and one is spared the pain of beholding delicate and evanescent shades become dulled and dimmed after but a brief exposure.

No exception, then, can be taken to the choice of black satin for the covering of the useful tea-cosy in the illustration, on which is applied a large spray of ox-eyed daisies, carelessly tied with mauve ribbons. Rows of petals, large and small, straight and curved, single and in groups of two and three together, were firmly outlined with the pyro-graphic needle, on a strip of white velvet laid on cardboard, and fastened down with drawing-pins. If cloth or felt were employed instead of velvet, this process would be unnecessary, as they can be cut with a clean edge; velvet has, however, a softer appearance. The petals were then sewn on to rounds of stiff muslin, closely together, following the shape of the flower. Centres were made by covering wadded rounds of cardboard with yellow satin, afterwards ornamented with French knots in orange silk. A few buds were also made, each with a green silk calyx.

Before pasting any of these in place the whole group was arranged on the cosy, and the stems sketched in with Chinese white. These were then finished with green embroidery thread, couched down with fine silk of the same colour. Narrow mauve ribbon was passed through the stems, tied and arranged with studied negligence, the folds tacked down, and the whole ribbon finally held in place by iridescent glass beads sewn on at regular intervals. Last of all, the daisies were pasted in place, each petal being carefully secured. The whole affair occupied but a few hours, though the result is decidedly original and uncommon.

A chair back of black silk, finished with deep black fringe, has motifs of wild roses applied in the same manner, the only difference being in the thorny stalks of the flowers, which, in this case, are cut from soft fawn leather. A spider's web is worked in fine silver thread, to connect the two sprays of roses, which, together with their foliage, are carried out in natural colours.

Very many other designs can be arranged in similar style; numerous flowers, fruits, and berries lending themselves well to this especial form of fancy work, which offers a wide field for original workers who love to stray occasionally from the beaten track. The pattern that accompanies this article may be used in many ways. The various leaves, petals, and buds may be traced separately, and the tracings used as a guide in cutting out the cloth. Then the shaped pieces of cloth may be arranged in any design according to the fancy of the worker.

A suggestion for a chair back. The stems are cut from thin leather, the spider's web being worked in silver thread

A suggestion for a chair back. The stems are cut from thin leather, the spider's web being worked in silver thread

Designs for ivy leaves, wild roses, and ox eyed daisies. From these shapes all the pieces for composing the needle work pictures described can be cut

Designs for ivy leaves, wild roses, and ox-eyed daisies. From these shapes all the pieces for composing the needle work pictures described can be cut