The thickness of sirup for canning fruits depends upon the kind of fruit with which it is to be used and upon the richness of the product desired.

In order to obtain the grades of sirup ordinarily used in canning, sugar and water may be combined in the following proportions and boiled five minutes. The quantity of water is given as the same in each grade in order to show the variation in the quantity of sugar used:

Thin Sirup - Four cups of water, two cups of sugar. This sirup may be used for such fruits as apples, pears, raspberries and other sweet berries, when a rich product is not desired.

Medium Sirup - Four cups of water, two and one-half cups of sugar. This sirup may be used for such fruits as sweet plums, blackberries, and sweet cherries.

Thick Sirup - Four cups of water, five cups of sugar. This sirup may be used for such fruits as peaches, cherries or pineapples, when a sweet product is desired.

A still thicker sirup may be desired for rhubarb, gooseberries, currants, sour cherries, and other very sour fruits. Such a sirup may be made by boiling the thick sirup until it begins to spin a thread.