Summer pruning does away with the necessity of staking and tying raspberries and blackberries. It does more than this; it increases the amount of fruit, makes it of better size and flavor, and gives the canes a form and a degree of hardness which enables them better to resist the severity of Northern winters. Without summer pruning these small fruits cannot be grown with profit or with any degree of certainty as to yield. A plantation neglected in this particular would soon run out young canes with a common corn knife, and the work can be done about as fast as a man can walk along the rows. The upward growth being thus checked, the side branches start rigorously, and push out long and assume a drooping form. , A new upward growth usually will not begin again, but in case it should, the cutting or pinching must be repeated. We should not check the growth of the side branches, unless they interfere with cultivation the first season, but shorten them in early in the spring of their bearing year.

The Black Gap Raspberries should be checked in their upward growth when about two or two and one-half feet in height. The work may be done either by pinching or cutting. If the patch be large, a convenient method is to clip the tops.

The Antwerps and their class should, also, be summer pruned when the shoots are about the same height. It is an object to promote the growth of side branches, as on these most of the fruit will be borne. Thus shortened the canes become stiff enough to support themselves in an upright position without the use of stakes.

Blackberries must be shortened in as above described, if the grower gets any profit or comfort in trying to produce this fruit. It produces the same effect as on the raspberries, viz : causing the side shoots to grow with vigor, and these must be severally shortened next spring. With this management staking may be entirely dispensed with, as, indeed, it is in plantations where these fruits are cultivated on a large scale for market.

Too many new canes should not be allowed to grow in a hill. Three or four of the Black Gaps are sufficient; four or five of the Antwerps and this class, and two or three of Blackberries. If more appear they should be cut away. - American Rural Home.

Summer Pruning Small Fruits #1

The Vermont Farmer, in an article urging the necessity of attending to this important operation, says:

Summer pruning does away with the necessity of staking and tying raspberries and blackberries. It does more than this: it increases the amount of fruit, makes it of a better size and flavor, and gives the canes a form and degree of hardness which enable them better to resist the severity of Northern winters. Without summer pruning, these small fruits cannot be grown with profit or with any degree of certainty of,yield. A plantation neglected in this particular would soon ran out.

The Black cap raspberry should be checked in its upward growth when about two or two and a half feet high. The work may either be done by pinching or cutting. If the patch be large, a convenient method is to clip the tops of the young canes with a common corn knife, and the work can be done about as fast as a man can walk along the# rows. The upward growth being thus checked, the side branches start out vigorously, and push out long and assume a drooping form. A new upward growth will not usually begin again, but in case it should, the cutting or pinching must be repeated. We should not check the growth of the side branches, unless they interfere with cultivation the first season, but shorten them early in the spring of their bearing year.

The Antwerps and their class should also be summer-pruned when the shoots are about the same hight. It is .an object to promote the growth of-side branches, as on these most of the fruit will be born. Thus shortened, the canes become stiff enough to support themselves in an upright position without the use of stakes.

Blackberries must be shortened in as above described, if the grower gets any profit or comfort in trying to produce this fruit. It produces the same effect as on the raspberries, viz: causing the side shoots to grow with vigor, and these must be severally shortened next spring. With this management, staking may be entirely dispensed with, as indeed, it is in plantations where these fruits are cultivated on a large scale for market.

Too many new canes should not be allowed to grow in a hill. Three or four of the Black caps are sufficient; four or five of the Antwerps and this class, and two or three of blackberries. If more appear they should be cut away.