We have standing in flower beds on our lawn two rustic supports for flowering vines, roses and the like, that are so pretty, cheap, easily made and efficient, that I thought some of your many readers might, perhaps, like to make something of the kind for themselves. Ours are made of red cedar bean poles, ten or twelve feet long, simply nailed together where they cross each other. Very likely they may bo made different from either of these, and be equally pretty. They look well on a lawn in winter, when, of course, they are naked; but, when clothed with brilliant flowers in summer, they are beautiful.- Country Gentleman.

Supports For Climbers #1

We have standing in flower beds on our lawn, two rustic supports for flowering vines, roses and the like, that are so pretty, cheap, easily made, and efficient, that I thought some of your many readers might, perhaps, like to make something of the kind for themselves. Ours ore made of red cedar bean poles, ten or twelve feet long, simply nailed together where they cross each other. Very likely they may be made different from either of these, and be equally pretty. They look well on a lawn in winter, when, of course, they are naked; but when clothed with brilliant flowers in summer, they are beautiful.- Country Gent. Soot as a Garden Fertilizer. -Per« haps it may never have occurred tor some of our fair lady readers, that the refuse soot of their chimnies is one of the most valuable stimulants and fertilizers they can have for their garden flowers. The following incident of practical experience is from a lady contributor to The Rural Carolinian: During two seasons we nursed, fed and petted a Hartford Prolific grape-vine - as much for its shade over a window as for its fruit - but it persisted in remaining a stunted cane, yellow, and refusing to climb. At the window, on the other side of the door, we had a stunted rosebush, also yellow and refusing to climb.

Despairing of shade, grapes and roses, we finally bethought ourselves of soot as a manure, and forthwith made a "soot tea" by steeping a tea-cup of soot in a quart of water. This we administered, two doses each, to both the tree and the vine. The vine grew six feet in height in the space of six weeks, the rose-bush four feet in the same length of time - both thereafter rejoicing in raiment of living green.

Culture of Fuchsias - To grow the fuchsia to perfection, Mr. H. E. Chitty says a light, rich soil is necessary. Splendid plants may be grown in one season from young, soft shoots put in sand, as cuttings, and rooted in December and January; when rooted, the young plants should be placed in small pots, which should be replaced by larger ones from time to time, as the pots become filled with roots, until they are in pots five or six inches in diameter, in which size yearling plants will flower to perfection until late in fall, at which time water should gradually be withheld, and the plants brought into a dormant condition, when they may be placed in a dry, cool cellar for the winter. These same plants will flower still better the second year, if the side branches and tops are slightly pruned, the plants repotted into fresh earth, and occasionally treated to a little weak liquid manure through the season of flowering.