Hairing recently become a subscriber to the "Horticulturist," and per-ceiving from its pages the uniform courtesy with which you respond to the communications of your correspondents, I have taken the liberty of forwarding, by this mail, to your address, a rooted cutting of a Seedling Tea Rose (from "Pactole") requesting the favor of your opinion of Its merits after it has bloomed.

The flower is good medium size, not full double (averaging about 80 petals!) neither is it very handsome when fully blown - the flowers being pendulous, and the petals like most others of its class becoming more or less placid from a full exposure to the searcing rays of our summer sun. The opening or half expanded bud, however, is remarkably beautiful, and in a bouquet of my choicest roses, invariably attracts attention, both on account of its graceful form and striking color - the whole flower being of a deeper and purer yellow, than any other ever blooming rose, with which I am acquainted - I may add that as the plant increases m size, the flowers which are very flagrant, become deeper in color and more double than when It is smaller. The original plant is but two years from the seed, and has proved a most abundant bloomer - and one specimen in particular, budded last May, on a strong stock, three feet from the ground, has assumed a beautiful weeping habit, and is much admired.

Among my other seedlings is one of remarkable vigor, which shows an abundance of very large and handsome buds, not one of which has ever opened; the foot stalk withering just below the bud, which promises, however, to be very double, as I counted over 70 petals in the last which dropped.

It was raised In very rich soil, and though I have since removed it to a poorer spot, no improvement has, at least as yet, appeared. If your experience can suggest any remedy, I would be much gratified to hear from you through the " Horticulturist;" also be pleased to state whether yon have received the plant new sent.

I have named the yellow seedling, " Chruti* ana," and wish the name to be retained, if ft should ever be considered worthy of being propagated for sale.

This is the only cutting which I have parted with, and the last till I have heard your opto- Son. J. M. S. Kenansville, N. C, May 19, 1852.

The plant reached us in excellent order, and is now growing in our garden. We fear the failure to open the buda is a constitutional defect in the variety, which will always remain so - but it is possible that change of soil will modify it. We will report our success to J. M. S. En.

New Tea Rose #1

It is stated that a new Tea Rose, called Perle de Lyon, has been raised in France. This novelty is said to resemble Marshal Neil, but being only more beautiful.

New Tea Rose #2

It is stated that a new Tea Rose, called Perle de Lyon, has been raised in France. This novelty is said to resemble Marshal Neil, but being only more beautiful.