There is something so attractive and so graceful in the character of drooping trees, that they arrest the attention of persons who would scarcely bestow a glance upon the noblest and rarest trees of the ordinary upright habits of growth which prevail among the mass of forest trees. We see this exemplified daily in our own grounds. A Weeping Willow, common though it be, never fails to elicit admiration. In the hands of a skillful, judicious planter, no other trees are more effective in giving variety, character, and expression, to a landscape; but they must always be used sparingly, and with the exercise of good taste and a great deal of foresight We have known per-sons so captivated with the elegance of the Weeping Willow.

It is equally in bad taste to plant largely of trees in which any particular character revails to a striking degree. At certain points on the Hudson, the tapering Arbor itae is so thickly planted in some grounds that one can see nothing else. These, the tiffest, most artificial-looking, of all other trees, should be planted with the greatest aution. While two or three might produce a fine effect, entire groves or masses of hem become monotonous or disgusting.

It is quite obvious that weeping trees, to produce any effect, must be pretty well solated ; for their streaming side branches are the source of their peculiar grace and legance. This points out the jutting edges of groups of trees, and the open lawn, as heir appropriate situation. The Willows have a particularly fine effect on the margins f streams, ponds, or other bodies of water. Those with stronger branches, such as the Ash, Elm, etc., are well adapted to forming arbors, and are much employed for this purpose. All the drooping trees are considered appropriate ornaments to cemeteries; the mournful expression which their droop-ing habit conveys, certainly renders them fitting objects for this purpose.

This class of trees has, within a few years past, received more than ordinary attention; and the consequence is, numerous important additions have been made to the list Formerly our collection of weeping trees was meagre, extending but little beyond the Weeping Ash, Weeping Willow, and Birch. At present we have five or six varieties of Weeping Ash, several of Willow, beside Weeping Oaks, Elms, Poplars, Mountain Ash, Beech, Larch, Linden, Laburnum, Sophora, Thorns, and many others. Ample material has the landscape gardener here to meet every emergency of this character. Grafted on a common Ash eight to twelve feet from the ground, it makes a tree of great beauty. The growth is rapid, and it soon forms a largo, spreading, drooping, umbrella-like head.

Weeping Trees.

Weeping Trees.

The Gold-barked Weeping Ash is a very interesting variety; different from the common sort chiefly in having a yellow bark, which in winter is quite brilliant.

We have obtained here a seedling Black Ash, which promises to be a handsome drooping tree; the branches are exceedingly slender.

The Lentiscus-leaved Weeping Ash (Fraxinus lentiscifolia pendula) is a fine, spreading, and somewhat drooping tree, well worthy attention; but is inferior, as a weeper, to the others named.

Among those recently brought to notice is the American Weeping Willow, from France. It is a trailing species of American Willow grafted on some upright-growing sort When worked six or eight feet from the ground, it forms one of the most elegant weeping trees we have yet seen. The branches are very slender and numerous, and take a downward direction at once, like the falling spray from a jet d'eau. The above is a sketch of a yourg tree three years from the graft. It is more hardy than the common sort, and being a much smaller tree will be much more appropriate for small lawns and cemetery lots.

The Weeping Sophora (Sophora Japonica pendula) is a remarkable and elegant tree. Grafted on tall stocks of the Japan Sophora, it sends downward a head of long, slender, green shoots, quite ornamental, both in summer and winter. The foliage resembles that of the Laburnum and Locust, to which it is allied. It is quite far enough north here at Rochester, and does not succeed so well as it does further south. It is not so extensively propagated in he nurseries as it should be, and is always scarce. It is an exceedingly beautiful tree, nd should be planted wherever it will grow well. We shall continue notices of other rees of this character in future numbers.

AMERICAN WEEPING WILLOW.

AMERICAN WEEPING WILLOW.

S. FAAUECAERCER.SE. WEEPING SOPHORA.

S. FAAUECAERCER.SE. WEEPING SOPHORA.