We breathe an atmosphere of marvels. A few ears since the world was astonished by the announcement that so harmless a substance as cot-on wool could be made to serve the purposes of gunpowder; and gun cotton was patented for he purpose. Shortly afterwards an ingenious apothecary discovered that gun cotton could be imployed to heal the wound it caused, a substance called collodion, the prince of plasters, having teen made by dissolving this sort of cotton in ether. And now it appears as if collodion itself vere likely to become a new arm in gardening.

Collodion is not merely adhesive, but impenetrable by water, and impervious to air. Taking dvantage of these properties, it occurred to Mr. Lowe that in the nice act of propagating plants, his substance might be advantageously employed. It would be unjust to this gentleman if we id not give his statement, as officially made publio in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, boore whom a paper on the subject has been lately read.

It had occurred to him, that if a cutting of a plant were sealed at the base, so as to exclude he moisture of the soil from ascending the stem in injurious quantities, the method of striking uttings of most species of plants would not be so precarious a process as at present; and ccordingly some collodion was obtained in order to make the experiment.

With respect to this new process, he states, that immediately upon the cutting being severed pom the parent stem, the collodion was applied to the wound, and then left a few seconds to dry, iter which the cuttings were potted in the ordinary manner.

To test the value of this new process more effectually, duplicates of all the species experimented upon were at the same time similarly planted, without the collodion being applied to hem.

Experiments were carried on in two different ways; one batch of cuttings being placed on a tot-bed, while a second batch was planted in the open ground, without even the protection of lass.

First Batch

All of which were placed on a hot-bed on the 1st of September, and examined n the 1st of October:

Stove Plants

Name of Plant

Number of Cuttings with Collodion applied.

Number of

Cuttings which took root

Number of

Cuttings without the

Application of Collodion.

Number of

Cuttings which took root

xora coccines ...................

1

1

1

0

acosonia miniata ....................

1

1

1

1

ranciascea Hopeans .....................

8

3

3

0

" Pohllans .......................

8

8

8

0

Hoxinia Maria Van Houtte .....................

8

0

8

1

egonia incarnata .......................

8

8

8

1

chilenes patens ......................

8

7

8 .

6

loya bella ...........................

8

8

8

1

ondeletica speciosa ......................

8

8

8

1

llamanda nerifolia ...........................

8

8

8

1

Greenhouse Plants

Name of Plant

Number of

Cuttings with Collodion applied.

Number of

Cuttings which took root

Number of

Cuttings without the application of Collodion.

Number of

Cuttings which took root

oronia serrulata ...............

6

5

6

0

Polygala Dalmaisiana .................

8

1

8

0

" grandiflora ....................

6

8

6

9

Verbena luna ....................

6

6

6

6

Chorozema cordate ....................

1

1

1

0

Cpacric pallida ...................

1

0

1

0

Leachenaultia formosa ......................

2

2

2

1

walnonia astragalifolia .....................

1

1

1

0

" galegifolia,......................................

1

0

1

0

Abelia rupestria ..........................

2

9

2

0

Plectranthus concolor pleta ...........................

4

2

4

9

Second Batch

Planted in the open ground on the 1st of September, and examined on the 1st of October:

Hardy Plants

Name of Plant

Number of Cuttings with Collodion applied.

Number of

Cuttings which took root

Number of

Cuttings without the application of Collodion.

Number of

Cuttings which took root.

Garrya elliptica .......................

12

5

12

1

Erica vagana .........................

12

7

12

4

Bupleurum longifollum .............

18

6

18

0

Laurus foetens ......................

12

10

12

7

Rose, Souvenir de la Malmalson .........................

6

4

6

8

Taxus baccata, golden-leaved variety ..................

12

8

12

4

. -

Total Number of Cuttings to which Collodion was applied.

Number of

Cuttings which took root.

Total No. of Cuttings without the application of Collodion.

Number of

Callings which took root.

First batch ................................

59

46

59

28

Second batch .....................................

72

40

72

19

The experiment, the author considers, speaks for itself Notwithstanding the season being too far advanced for the full benefit of the process to be thoroughly observed, still twice as many cuttings took root treated by the new method as had rooted by the old. The mortality in the open ground was increased by slugs having eaten off above the soil some of the cuttings. Those thus damaged were examined after they had been in the ground a month, and it was found that the collodion was quite as sound as when first applied. It would therefore appear that the collodion seals the wound of the cutting, and protects it from the fatal effects of damp, until roots are prepared to force through the covering of gun cotton.

It is further stated that the application of this solution has been found to be exceedingly beneficial in the pruning of such plants as Euphorbia speciosa, Impatient latifolia, Impatient latifolia alba, Hoya bello, Hoya imperialism Ac, the cut branches being prevented from bleeding.

It is the author's intention next spring to follow out this experiment, in budding and grafting, as he considers that it will also be useful in this branch of horticulture.

Gutta percha, dissolved in ether, was in some instances substituted to heal the wounds caused by pruning; yet owing to this solution not drying as rapidly as collodion, the first, and sometimes the second application was not sufficient.

The effect of these solutions upon cut flowers was very marked. Two branches were gathered as nearly alike as possible; to the flower-stalks of the one, collodion was applied. These flowers were placed in vases filled with water. Those coated over with collodion began to fade in thirty-six hours, and many were quite dead in three days; while the flowers merely placed in water in the ordinary manner remained fresh and healthy. Those that faded soonest were Reseda odorata and Tropaeolum majus, and those which were least affected were Tagetes ereeta and Senecio erubescens.

Want of space prevents further notice of this curious statement at this time, but we propose to take an early opportunity of returning to it - Gardeners' Chronicle, London.

Best ripened Fuchsias in it, choosing the oldest of my plants for the purpose. I syringe them overhead morning and evening with tepid water, which I also apply to the vines. Under this treatment, in the course of a fortnight or so they begin to show symptoms of growth. I then raise my house to 50 deg., after which they push vigorously. I now take cuttings off all I can, and, having a bed made previously for their reception, I insert them in a compost of leaf-mold and silver sand, taking care to drain the pots well I also put about half an inch of white sand on the top of the pot; this keeps the soil open around the neck of the cutting, and prevents damping off, which Fuchsia cuttings are apt to do at this season in mold alone. Supposing my cuttings to be struck now, I pot them off singly into 3-inch pots, in a mixture of leaf-mold, a little well-decomposed cow-dung and some sand, watering them sparingly. I then place them in a slight bottom-heat, where they soon make a start, and if all goes on well they will soon be six inches high, when I shift them into a 5-inch pot in a compost of rich turfy loam, rotten cow-dung, a little leaf-mold, and sand. I now bring them to the vinery, keeping them close up to the glass.

They now reap the benefit of their shift, and become strong and vigorous, throwing out laterals or side shoots in abundance. About this stage I apply a small stake, to which I tie the leader very loosely. The side shoots now make rapid progress, and when they have attained the length of two or three joints, I pinch off one, leaving one or two, according to the length of the joints. In this way I double my side shoots. I now give a little weak liquid manure, made of sheep's dung, if that can be got. I give them this twice a week, which invigorates them, and makes them push fresh laterals, which I again pinch, tying the leader to the stake as it grows. By this time the pot will be pretty well filled with roots. I now give them their final shift for the season, using a 10-inch pot, and good rough compost, consisting of turfy loam and cow-dung, in equal parts, mixed with a little .leaf-mold. By the beginning of August I have got pretty tolerable plants; I therefore let them come into bloom, watering liberally with manure water, and putting a slight mulching of cow-dung on the top of the pots. They will flower till the end of October or middle of November. I now have the foundation laid for specimen plants the following season.

After they have done flowering, I store them in an empty pit, giving only as much water as will keep them alive till spring. Next year they get the same treatment as last, and by these means I succeed in getting plants which are the admiration of all who see them. - B., in Gardeners' Chronicle, London.