Seedling Fruits

For the best collection of seedling Apples, grown by one individual,

Premium, The Society's Silver Medal.

For the best collection of seedling Pears, grown by one individual,

Premium, The Sooiety's Silver Medal.

For the best collection of seedling hardy Native Grapes, either from native seeds or hybrids, grown by one individual,

Premium, The Society's Silver Medal. For the best collection of seedling Plums, grown by one individual,

Premium, The Society's Silver Medal. For the best collection of seedling Peaches, grown by one individual,

Premium, The Society's Silver Medal.

Seedling Of The Stanwick Nectarine

At the late meeting of the British Pomological Society, Mr. Rivers reported on a seedling of the Stanwick Nectarine, as an improvement on the original fruit. It is very large, one specimen being eight inches in circumference, and of the shape of a truncated cone; the flesh separates freely from the stone, is exceedingly tender and melting, being somewhat of a buttery texture, like the most delicate of the Beurre Pears; the juice very abundant, and so full of sugar as to be quite a syrup; the flavor, full and rich; the kernel, like that of its parent, is quite sweet, like a Filbert. This fruit was from a plant grown in a pot, and the stone in every instance was cracked.

Seedling Pansies

Stopping at the fine residence of Mr. Pillot, Orange, we saw a couple of very fine seedling Pansies, raised by his gardener, Mr. Carmohn. Both are large, and unexceptionable in form. One a deep, brilliant yellow, with a maroon eye, we named Sceptre d'Or; the other, nearly a sky blue, with a white eye, we named Mrs. Pillot. This is a unique and beautiful flower, of a very striking color. There are many noteworthy things about Mr. Pillot's place, which we may say something about hereafter.

A Seedling Peach

Mr. Cranstoun, of Hoboken, sent us a seedling Peach Oct. 18, which was then in good condition. It is a large yellow fleshed Peach, with a small pit; sweet, moderately juicy, and very good. Its large size, late ripening, and good quality render it valuable.

Seedling Peach #1

Mr. Thomas Bush-nell, of Hayesville, O., sends me a sample of a yellow peach, which he regards as a seedling. On examining it, I can see a close resemblance to Yellow Admirable or Orange - once pretty generally cultivated, and a sort that bears well, and with a habit almost certain of reproducing itself, which accords with the account sent of this seedling. F. R. E.

Seedling Pears

At the exhibition of the Pomological Congress of France, in September last, M. Gregoire-Kelis exhibited one hundred and twenty unnamed seedling pears and forty-eight new-named varieties. The unnamed seedlings are spoken of by the London Journal of Horticulture as "having nothing attractive among them," while the named ones are recorded as a list without description.

New Seedling Pears #1

Thomas H. Ge-nin, St. Clairsville, O., has grown quite a number of seedling pears from seeds of the Seckel. We have been favored with samples of some of them the past fall, and made drawings and descriptions which, perhaps, we shall hereafter publish. Several of them are of really high character in quality, much resembling their parent, but the size is in this age of progress against them, as they are little, if any, larger than the parent. Their period of maturity is at a later season, and we think one or two of them almost as desirable as Dana's Hovey.