If our readers have been good enough to accompany us on a visit to Canada, they have doubtless discovered that there are many persons deeply interested in horticultural topics. They may also be interested to learn a few more facts regarding their near neighbors, whose agricultural statistics are more remarkable than many have believed. A few of these have reached us which may interest, no less than surprise', those whose attention has not been called to them.

In 1851 the whole animal and vegetable produce of Canada was 941,597; in 1856 it reached the enormous advance of 4,3840. Her undeveloped fisheries produce already 115.000 per annum. These figures represent the surplus wealth in productive industry only; manufactories also pay tribute to the export trade of the colony - in 1856 amounting to 104,000; ship-building alone shows a money value of 303,000. Added to these the value of exportations to inland ports we find in 1856 to be 8,000.

Turning to the home records of the colony, evidence exists of its condition and progress highly curious. In 1851 the gross amount of wheat grown was 16,202,272 bushels, showing an increase of 400 per cent during the ten previous years, while the increase in the United States had only reached 48 per cent. In oats, the produce increased 70 per cent, while that of the States was only 17 per cent; increase of Indian corn in Canada 163 per cent, and in the States 56 per cent. By comparing these with a separate State of the Union, and selecting Ohio for the purpose - no mean competitor, we have the following very curious table.

The land in Ohio is valued at nearly double that of the average of the Union, and has more than three times as many inhabitants to the square mile, she having 40,55, while the average of the Union is only 15.75. Let us look at some of the principal items. (See accompanying table).

Canada.

Ohio.

Population .................

...1,942,265.

...1,980,427

Acres occupied, cultivated ...................

.. 7,300,839.

" " uncultivated ..................

..10,638,957.

...8,146,000

Total occupied ............................

..17,939,796.

..17,999,493

Acres occupied to each inhabitant.

.....93 4.

...9 0 18

Acres of wheat ......................

...1,136,311..

...1,221.437

Produce in bushels ......................

..16,155,946.

...14,487,351

Bushels per acre ..........................

........14.2.

..........12

Bushels per inhabitant ...................

......................8.9

........7.3

Assessed value of occupied lands..

65,879,048.,

89,689,551

Oats, produce in bushels .......................

..21.434,840.

..13,472,742

Barley ..........................

.... 354,358

Rye...........................

.....869,835..

425,718

Peas ...............

...4,223,487..

.....55,168

Cows .............................

.....591,438..

....544,499

Horses .........................

.... 453,397

Sheep ............................

...1,597,849.,

...3,942,929

Cattle ............................

.....741,106.,

814,448

These were the statistics of 1851; since then the country has been advancing at even a more rapid rate. In 1851 the gross wheat produce amounted to 16,125,956 bushels, in 1856 to 26,255,664, showing an increase of 10,399,738 bushels, which is equal to 64.3 per cent in the five years, and raises the return from 8.9 bushels to 10.6 bushels per head of population. In barley and rye, the returns are even more satisfactory.

In 1763, the population of Canada is given at 82,000; 1814, 430,000; 1823, 575,000; 1831, 772,000; 1844,1,199,000; 1848,1,491,000; 1851,1,842,265; 1856, 2,500,000. If we compare these returns with those of the States, say for the last decennial census, we can form some idea of the relative population progress of Canada. In Great Britain the increase amounted to 13.2 per cent; in the United States to 85 per cent, while the population of Canada increased 69 per cent; or if we were to take the western province alone, we should find an increase of no less than 104 per cent in the ten years. This increased population appears to be the very life-blood of the colony.

While the export trade since 1851, shows an increase of, in round numbers, 150 per cent, the imports have fully doubled themselves in the same period.

If we take the present productive returns of the cultivated lands as a basis for calculations, it would be seen that the already occupied land in the colony would support a population of about 10,000,000 inhabitants; and if the present progressive rate of increase is sustained, a writer in " Hunt's Merchants' Magazine " tells us, that at the close of the present century, we may expect to see Canada occupied by a population something like 20,000,000 in number. Whatever her numbers may be, it is quite certain for years to come, the great strength of the country will lie in the productions of her soil. With these she will pay for foreign manufactures; her surplus will supply foreign wants, whose surplus will administer to her necessities and comforts, and thus the scales of commercial benefit be kept pretty evenly balanced.

It is quite clear that there is ample space in Canada for a largely increased population, and it is equally clear, if we may judge from the past, that every increase is followed by a generally increased prosperity. To induce this by means of immigration, the government have lately offered free grants of land along three great arterial lines of road, which have been recently opened up and laid out for settlement. The grants are not to exceed 100 acres to each.

These lands are generally of very excellent quality, and well adapted to all the purposes of husbandry.

Australia excepted, no country furnishes such singular instances of the rise in the value of surveyed lands as the last five years have witnessed in Canada. The development of the railway system throughout the Province, has been the principal agency by which this has been effected. When we recollect that 1852 saw Canada without a single railway, and that 1857 saw her with 1500 miles completed, and 500 miles more in process of construction, the rise in the value of land is readily understood. The lines of railway must be looked upon as a series of accessible markets for the country they serve. The natural consequence is, that every product of the farm has acquired a certain money value, although before this new access to market it may have been absolutely valueless. The immense remuneration thus obtained'for the same outlay of labor, has greatly enhanced the value of capital. Land in old settlements, remote from lake ports, has doubled itself in value in five years; while wild lands in new settlements, near to which a railway passes, have trebled their value within a shorter period.

These all-powerful means of communication have opened up the country, made available a vast amount of inert wealth, stimulated industry, and effected a complete revolution in farming economy within a range of twenty miles on either side of the course they take.

For some remarkable statistics regarding the Victoria Tubular Bridge, at Montreal, the reader may consult with pleasure the article on " Iron Bridges," in the London Quarterly Review for last July.