This disease is not very common, and is rather obscure. It is frequently the result of some injury, and may be local and subacute, (that is, not very acute), or it may be acute. The subacute is a local form of inflammation, not extending to any great distance. It produces redness and thickening of the artery, with effusion of lymph into the cavity, and coagulation of the blood within it. The symptoms are, tenderness of the affected artery, with violent pain, numbness, absence of arterial pulsation, and tendency to gangrene, in the parts supplied by it.

The acute form has a tendency to spread, and involve the arterial system generally, and to produce rapid suppuration, and it is almost always fatal. It may arise without any apparent cause, or it may be the consequence of a wound. It is known by very violent fever, and great throbbing of the arteries; succeeded by symptoms of irritable or typhoid fever; with livid vesications on different parts of the body. If the disease originate in a wound, there will probably be gangrene.

The treatment of both these cases must be what is called antiphlogistic, (that is, all means calculated to reduce inflammation and fever), without reducing the patient too low. Cold applications, iced water, vinegar and water, may be applied to the inflamed part, and the following mixture may be taken every two or three hours.

Bi-carbonate of Potash.........................Half an Ounce.

Citric Acid........................................Three Drams.

Tincture of Henbane...........................Two Drams.

Syrup..............................................Half an Ounce.

Sweet Spirit of Nitre...........................Six Drams.

Water sufficient to make Half a Pint.

For an adult, two tablespoonfuls tor a dose : Or the following:

Solution of Acetate of Ammonia...........One Ounce.

Sweet Spirit of Nitre..........................One Ounce.

Compound Tincture of Cardamoms........Half an Ounce.

Water sufficient to make Half a Pint.

Two tablespoonfuls may be taken every two or three hours.

If there is much pain, Bromide of Potash or Ammonia may ba taken two or three times a day, in ten or fifteen grain doses (for an adult); or the Hydrate of Chloral may be taken, in fifteen grain doses, every four hours.

The diet may be nourishing, but not stimulating.