This is the most frequent of all fractures. It occurs most often in children. It is indicated by pain, dropping of the shoulder, swelling over the broken bone, irregularity, and a grating sensation when the shoulder is moved. There is no difficulty in setting a fracture of the clavicle, but it is by no means easy in all cases to hold the fractured ends in position. The most simple method of treating fracture of the clavicle is a figure-of-eight bandage made out of a pair of suspenders which are passed in front of each shoulder, and crossed and buckled behind, making a figure 8, the shoulders being included in the loops. By this means the shoulder of the injured side may be drawn back, so that the ends of the bones are brought near together. Our respected teacher, Prof. Sayre, of Bellevue Hospital College of New York, has devised a very simple method of treating these cases by means of adhesive straps, as shown in Figs. 369 and 370.

Fig. 369. Front View of Treating Fracture of the Collar Bone.

Fig. 369. Front View of Treating Fracture of the Collar Bone.

Fig. 370. Back View of Treating Fracture of the Collar Bone.

Fig. 370. Back View of Treating Fracture of the Collar Bone.