Emplattomena

(From Emplattomena 3316 to obstruct).

See Emphractica.

Empneumatosis

(From Empneumatosis 3317 to blow into, or inflate ). An inflation of the stomach, the womb, or other parts.

Emporium

(From Emporium 3318 negotiator, from

Emporium 3320 to negotiate). See Cerebrum.

Emprion

(From Emprion 3321 to saw). Saw-like. A kind of pulse mentioned by Galen, in which the artery is unequally distended in different parts.

Emprosthotonos

(From Emprosthotonos 3322 forwards, and to bend). A spasm which bends the body forward, and confines it in that position. Celsus, lib. iv. cap. 3, restricts the term to a convulsive stiffness of the neck, by which the chin is fixed on the breast. See Tetanus.

Emptysis

(From Emptysis 3324 to spit out). Spitting of blood; a discharge which comes only from the mouth, fauces, and parts adjacent. Aretaeus.

Empyemata

(From Empyemata 3329 ). So the ancients called suppurating medicines; for they named an internal collection of pus empyema.

Empyi

Purulent or suppurated, or those who have purulent abscesses internally.

Empyreuma

(From Empyreuma 3330 to kindle, or in the fire). In chemistry it is the offensive smell and taste which distilled waters, or other substances, receive from being too much exposed to the fire, when their mucilage is burnt.

Empyreumatica Olea

(From Empyreumatica Olea 3332 ).

Emvvreumatic oils. Oils both of the animal and vegetable kind, distilled with a heat greater than that of boiling water; and thus receiving a burnt smell. These oils are sometimes considered as of a distinct class; but they are only burnt, and dissolve more or less in rectified spirit of wine; are acrid; by repeated distillations volatile, and almost free from their disagreeable smell. In some respects they resemble the essential oils of vegetables. They are considered as powerful antispasmodics: that chiefly used is the oleum Dippeliianimale.

Empyros

(From Empyros 3333 and fire). One labouring under a fever.

Emulgens

(From emulgo, to milk out). Emulgent, milking out. The term is applied to the arteries and veins, from the aorta and vena cava to the kidneys. According to the ancients, they strained and milked the serum through the kidneys.