The Securitas Water-Closet.

Figs. 427 to 431 show later improvements in this device developed by the writer in connection with his shallow seal "Securitas" trap and designated by the same name.

The principal points of these recent improvements are, first, a much deeper seal; second, a construction of the upper or rim flush so as to require the water to enter the bowl absolutely free from pressure and without the customary rim perforations. This insures noiselessness at this point. Third, an inclined shelf all around inside at the neck of the

*"Entwasserungs-Anlagen Amerikanischer Gebaude" Nr. 10 in "Forts-chritte auf dem Gebiete der Architektur" Stuttgart 1897, Verlag von Arnold Bergstrasser bowl so arranged as to break the fall of the upper flush and render it noiseless again at this point; fourth, a construction of the siphon jet at the level of the dip of the trap in accordance with designs originated by the writer in his earlier experiments in attaining noiseless action as shown in Figs. 425 and 426, but with the improvement now of giving the jet an oval form and a special method of co-operating with an immediately adjoining jet supplying the upper flush, as shown in Fig. 429, for the purpose of completely balancing the action of the two jets; fifth, a very great increase in the power of the jets whereby their action becomes much quicker and more effective in every way; sixth, a curving of the upcast limb of the trap around the siphon jet in such a manner as to force the flushing stream across the path of the jet whereby the waste matters are caught up at once and whirled directly into the waste pipe without hesitation or back eddies; and finally, seventh, an enlargement of the waste pipe end of the fixture beyond the crown of the trap so that it shall exceed the size of the trap itself for the purpose of preventing the siphon action, generally sought for to assist the jet in discharging the wastes. This siphonic or suction action is most unscientific and undesirable because it renders the flushing of the apparatus dependent upon a fortuitous and varying suction pull differing with each different installation, rather than upon a scientifically adjusted jet power, permanently regulated by a definite water head established for each fixture by distance below the main house-cistern in the attic above the jet. This regulation is accomplished by a very simple small auxiliary valve beyond the main valve, or flushometer, directly connected with each closet.

Trap Jet Closet 466

Fig. 427.

Trap Jet Closet 467

Fig. 428.

Fig. 428a. Sections and Plan of the First Step in the Later Improvements.

Fig. 428a. Sections and Plan of the First Step in the Later Improvements.

It nicely regulates the duration of the flush to the amount required and thus prevents all water waste.

Moreover, the siphonic, or suction action, tends to uncover the jet and invariably gives rise to noisy action, sometimes very loud, especially when the jet is exposed.

The breaking of the suction, moreover, adds a most disagreeable gulping noise at the end of the action. These objectionable features are avoided by the use of the exclusive jet action of discharge without siphonage.

All these various modifications combine to produce an extraordinarily rapid and positive discharge of the waste matters with a minimum consumption of water and a maximum noiselessness. This quiet instantaneous action produces an almost magical effect. On operating the flush valve the water level in the bowl instantly drops while the upper flush noiselessly wells over the edge in a thick layer, glides down to the neck ledge, and the jets being nicely proportioned to each other, keeps the water supply above the dip, muffling the lower jet while the waste matters disappear. Scarcely has the action fairly begun when it is finished and clean water is seen to rise again in the bowl from the reservoir chamber as noiselessly and almost as quickly as it disappeared. Nothing can resist the power of these jets working in co-operation in the deep funnel of the bowl, and the lightest substances are whisked away with the same quiet relentless certainty that a cork rides over the edge of Niagara.

Fig. 429. Longitudinal Section of Final Improvement.

Fig. 429. Longitudinal Section of Final Improvement.

Fig. 430. Transverse Section of Final Improvement.

Fig. 430. Transverse Section of Final Improvement.

Fig. 4S1. Plan of Final Improvement.

Fig. 4S1. Plan of Final Improvement.

In order still further to insure that there shall be no siphon or suction action of the drain end beyond the trap, a short air pipe may be run from a small hole beyond the crown of the trap into the main soil pipe behind the closet. This, however, is not indispensable, but only a refinement.

The very deep seal of this fixture, especially when aided by the shallow seal trap, renders this closet absolutely antisiphonic, for the reasons already described, so that the last argument raised for back venting becomes groundless.

Figs. 427 to 428 represent the steps leading to the perfected design 429 to 431.

Fig. 432 shows an early method of replenishing the seal of a siphon closet indefinitely and automatically after siphonage or evaporation. The lowering of the water in the trap through any cause opens the cistern supply valve automatically by atmospheric pressure variation, and closes it again as soon as the trap fills. But the simpler method of seal protection devised later and described above now renders this more complicated device superfluous.