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Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death | by Frederic W. H. Myers



The book which is now at last given to the world is but a partial presentation of an ever-growing subject which I have long hoped to become able to treat in more adequate fashion. But as knowledge increases life rolls by, and I have thought it well to bring out while I can even this most imperfect text-book to a branch of research whose novelty and strangeness call urgently for some provisional systematisation, which, by suggesting fresh inquiries, further accumulation of evidence may tend as speedily as possible to its own supersession. Few critics of this book can, I think, be more fully conscious than its author of its defects and its lacunæ; but also few critics, I think, have yet realised the importance of the new facts which in some fashion the book does actually present.

TitleHuman Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death
AuthorFrederic W. H. Myers
PublisherLongmans, Green, And Co.
Year1904
Copyright1903, Longmans, Green, And Co.
AmazonHuman Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death

Cessas in vota precesqut. Trcs, ait, Aenea. cessas? Neque enim ante dehiscent Adtonita magna ora dontus. - Virgil.

"Nay."' quoth the Sybil, " Trojan! wilt thou spare The impassioned effort and the conquering prayer ? Nay ' not save thus those doors shall open roll, - That Power within them burst upon the soul".

In Two Volumes

First Edition

Dedicated To Henry Sidgwick And Edmund Gurney

-Preface
The book which is now at last given to the world is but a partial presentation of an ever-growing subject which I have long hoped to become able to treat in more adequate fashion. But as knowledge inc...
-Editorial Note
This unfinished preface consists of several passages written at different times by the author, who died on January 17th, 1901. In 1896, he arranged that the completion of his book should be in the han...
-Metaphysical Glossary
[Note. - The words and phrases here included fall under three main heads: - (i) Words in common philosophical or medical use, to which no new shade of meaning is given in this inquiry, eg. ecmnesia...
-Metaphysical Glossary. Part 2
Automatism The words automatism and automatic are used in somewhat different senses by physiologists and psychologists. Thus Sir M. Foster says (Foster's Physiology, 5th edition, p. 920), We spea...
-Metaphysical Glossary. Part 3
Discarnate Disembodied, opposed to incarnate. Used of that part of man which still subsists after bodily death. Disintegration Of Personality Used of any condition where the sense of personal...
-Metaphysical Glossary. Part 4
Medium A person through whom communication is deemed to be carried on between living men and spirits of the departed. As commonly used in spiritist literature, this word is liable to the objection ...
-Metaphysical Glossary. Part 5
Premonition A supernormal indication of any kind of event still in the future. Preversion A tendency to characteristics assumed to lie at a further point of the evolutionary progress of a spe...
-Explanation Of Plan Of Arrangement And System Of References
In each volume of the book the argument runs on continuously through the Chapters placed at the beginning of the volume. A few illustrative cases are included in these Chapters, but the great mass of ...
-Syllabus For Chapter I. Introduction
100. Man has never yet applied the method of science to the problem of his own survival of death. 101. There has been much belief in survival, - both definite belief and vague belief, - but neverth...
-Syllabus For Chapter II. Disintegrations Of Personality
200. Each man is at once profoundly unitary and almost infinitely composite. 201. I believe that the unifying principle of his personality is an indwelling soul, and that souls have actually been ...
-Syllabus For Chapter III. Genius
300. Our study, in the last chapter, of the disintegrations of personality will teach us to seek our type of normal manhood in some example of strongly centralised control over as many elements of ...
-Syllabus For Chapter IV. Sleep
400. In the two preceding chapters I have reviewed the main disturbances and alternations of man's personality, and have then considered the norm of the waking phase of that personality. The sleeping ...
-Syllabus For Chapter V. Hypnotism
500. Preliminary survey of the chapter. I first show that hypnotism is an experimental development of the sleeping phase of personality. Then, reviewing the various accredited modes of inducing ...
-Syllabus For Chapter V. Hypnotism. Part 2
521. The hypnotic trance is not identical with ordinary sleep. The subliminal self comes to the front in reply to our appeal, and displaces just so much of the supraliminal self as may be needful for ...
-Syllabus For Chapter V. Hypnotism. Part 3
548. Possibility of utilising this vividness and durability of hallucinatory sensation in such a manner as to extend human faculty. 549. The so-called transposition of senses is perhaps a ...
-Syllabus For Chapter VI. Sensory Automatism
600. Summary of preceding chapters. While various kinds of manifestations of the Subliminal Self are disintegrative or morbid in character, we find in each class indications of higher faculties and ...
-Syllabus For Chapter VI. Sensory Automatism. Part 2
619. For this purpose it would be convenient to dispense with external suggestion, and confine our attention to the mind of the percipient. There are already in ordinary life indications of some ...
-Syllabus For Chapter VI. Sensory Automatism. Part 3
639. Between these minor dissociations expressing themselves through the brain and the complete dissociation from the brain itself occurring at death come the apparently intermediate cases of ...
-Chapter I. Introduction. Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death
Major agit deus, atque opera in maiora remittit. - Virgil. 100. In the long story of man's endeavours to understand his own environment and to govern his own fates, there is one gap or omission ...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 2
102. A brief recall to memory of certain familiar historical facts will serve to make my meaning clearer. Let us consider how it has come about that, whereas the problem of man's survival of death is ...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 3
104. Mesmer Again, the latent possibilities of suggestion, - though not yet under that name, and mingled with who knows what else? - broke forth into a blaze in the movement headed by Mesmer; - a...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 4
107. I know not how much of originality or importance may be attributed by subsequent students of the subject to the step next in order in this series of approximations. To those immediately concerned...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 5
108. Of fundamental importance, indeed, is this doctrine of telepathy the first law, may one not say? - laid open to man's discovery, which, in my view at least, while operating in the material, is it...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 6
111. Here, then, we have two clear and definite views, - supported, the one by our inmost consciousness, the other by unanswerable observation and inference, - yet apparently incompatible the one with...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 7
112. Yet so far as the initial possibility or plausibility of such a widened conception of human consciousness is concerned; - and this is all which can be dealt with at this moment of its first intro...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 8
113. Now this hypothesis is exposed manifestly to two main forms of attack, which to a certain extent neutralise each other. On the one hand it has been attacked, as has already been indicated, as bei...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 9
115. These far-reaching speculations make the element of keenest interest in the inquiry which follows. But even apart from its possible bearing on a future life, the further study of our submerged me...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 10
117. But turning back once more to the physical side of our simile, we observe that our knowledge of the visible solar spectrum, however minute, is but an introduction to the knowledge which we hope u...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 11
120. Continuing this inquiry in my third chapter, I shall consider what kind of man he is to whom the epithet of normal, - an epithet often obscure and misleading, - may be most fitly applied. I shall...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 12
122. Thus far I shall have been dealing with conditions or phases of personality which, whether for good or evil, appear spontaneously and without artificial induction. Were we limited to such a revie...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 13
124. And thus (Chapter VII (Phantasms Of The Dead).) we come face to face with the supreme problem; - if not of all theoretical knowledge, at least of all knowledge as bearing upon the fate and the du...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 14
125. Much more, indeed, than would at first seem likely can be learnt by mere prolonged observation of spontaneous phantasms of the dead. Yet here as everywhere, - here more than anywhere, - the need ...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 15
126. Side by side with the automatism of arm and hand we must place the automatism of throat and tongue (Chapter IX (Trance, Possession And Ecstasy).). Automatic utterance parallels automatic script t...
-Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death. Part 16
127. The reader who may feel disposed to give his adhesion to this culminating group of the long series of evidences which have pointed with more and more clearness to the survival of human personalit...
-Chapter II. Disintegrations Of Personality
ó k , kσ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 2
203. The discussion of these disintegrations of personality needs, I think, some little clearing of the ground beforehand, if it is to avoid confusion. It will be needful to speak of concurrent and ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 3
204. Before we can picture to ourselves how that mass of consciousness may disintegrate, we ought, were it possible, to picture to ourselves how it is in the first instance integrated. That, however, ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 4
206. It is possible that if we could discern the minute psychology of this long series of changes, ranging from modifications too minute to be noted as abnormal to absolute revolutions of the whole ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 5
208. If we imagine these obscure operations under some such form as this, we get the advantage of being able to connect these insistent ideas in a coherent sequence with the more advanced phenomena ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 6
209. First, then, let us briefly consider what is the general type of hysterical troubles. Speaking broadly, we may say that the symptoms of hysteria form, in the first place, a series of phantom ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 7
211. This mode of description, - it may be convenient to point out, is thoroughly concordant with Professor Janet's phrase of rétrécissement de la personnalité. As he justly insists, the hysterical ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 8
214. What has been said of hysterical defects of sensation might be repeated for motor defects. There, too, the powers of which the supraliminal self has lost control continue to act in obedience to ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 9
216. The above examples, which might be greatly multiplied, especially from French sources will suffice to give a notion of dissolutive hysterical processes, as now observed with closer insight than ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 10
217. Miss Lucy R., the heroine of the first case, was an English governess in the family of a German manufacturer. She was thirty years of age, in perfect health, except for a local inflammation of ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 11
219. The two conditions, says Dr. Breuer, no longer differed, as formerly, only in the fact that in the first condition she was normal and in the second practically insane. For now in her first ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 12
220. In certain cases of Janet's, indeed, a new and false, but helpful memory was substituted for the old distressing memory; as where a hysteric, suffering from horror at the recollection of having ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 13
221. We may now pass from the first to the second of the categories of disintegration of personality suggested at the beginning of this chapter. The cases which I have thus far described have been ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 14
223. We must now go on to cases where the origin of the cleavage seems to us quite arbitrary, but where the cleavage itself seems even for that very reason to be more profound. It is no longer a ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 15
232. The old case of Mary Reynolds, which I next cite (232 A), is again remarkable in respect of the change of character involved. The deliverance from gloomy preoccupations - the childish ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 16
236. The case of Mollie Fancher, of which I quote (in 236 A) such brief and imperfect account as is accessible, might have been one of the most instructive of all, had it been observed and recorded ...
-Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 17
242. Next in order to the uprushes of genius will come the uprushes of dream. All men pass normally and healthily into a second phase of personality, alternating with the first. That is sleep, and ...
-Chapter III. Genius
Igneus est ollis vigor et coelestis origo Seminibus, quantum non noxia corpora tardant Terrenique hebetant artus moribundaque membra. - Virgil. 300. In my second chapter I (Introduction. Human P...
-Genius. Part 2
303. But before proceeding further I wish to guard against a possible misapprehension. I shall be obliged in this chapter to dwell on valuable aid rendered by subliminal mentation; but I do not mean ...
-Genius. Part 3
305. Such is the apparent parallelism; but of course no knowledge of a hierarchy of the familiar forms of nervous action can really explain to us the mysterious fluctuations of subliminal power. When ...
-Genius. Part 4
306. But at present, and before entering on that task of rendering manifest supernormal faculty, I am considering what we ought to regard as the normal range of faculty from which we start; - what, ...
-Genius. Part 5
307. I am not indeed here assuming that the faculty which is at the service of the man of genius is of a kind different from that of common men, in such a sense that it would need to be represented ...
-Genius. Part 6
309. I subjoin a table, compiled by the help of Dr. Scripture's collection, which will broadly illustrate the main points above mentioned. Some more detailed remarks may then follow. Table Of ...
-Genius. Part 7
There was certainly something peculiar in my calculating faculty. It began to show itself at between five and six, and lasted about three years.... I soon got to do the most difficult sums, always in ...
-Genius. Part 8
It is plain, then, that no support is given by what we know of this group to the theory which regards subliminal mentation as necessarily a sign of some morbid dissociation of psychical elements. Is t...
-Genius. Part 9
2. On another occasion Mr. Higton was walking through a field as to which a legend ran that a young lady was murdered there, while she held a sprig of thyme, and that any one passing through the field...
-Genius. Part 10
313. Cases observed as definitely as those just quoted are few in number; and I must pass on into a much trodden - even a confusedly trampled - field; - the records, namely, left by eminent men as to ...
-Genius. Part 11
314. In the first place, we note that a very brief and shallow submergence beneath the conscious level is enough to infuse fresh vigour into supraliminal trains of thought. Ideas left to mature ...
-Genius. Part 12
316. Yet while thus demurring at many points both to Professor Lombroso's statistics themselves and to the conclusions based upon them, I recognise that there are underlying facts of great importance ...
-Genius. Part 13
319. The weak point in the materialistic synthesis, briefly given above, is of course the superficial way in which it is forced to treat the appearance of life on the planet. In our absolute ...
-Genius. Part 14
321. Once more. If this point of view be steadily maintained, we shall gain further light on some of those strangenesses and irregularities of genius which have led to its paradoxical juxtaposition ...
-Genius. Part 15
323. Let us consider the position of speech among human modes of self-expression. The whole person of one human being is more or less expressive to others of his kind. In repose it tells of action ...
-Genius. Part 16
325. Returning, then, from these illustrations drawn from actual automatism to our proper subject of genius, - that happy mixture of subliminal with supraliminal faculty - we may ask ourselves in ...
-Genius. Part 17
327. But when we reach this point we have begun (as I say) to transcend the special province to which, in Chapter I (Introduction. Human Personality And Its Survival Of Bodily Death)., I assigned the ...
-Genius. Part 18
328. And first, as to the connection between genius and automatism, one may say that just as anger is a brief madness, so the flash of Genius is essentially a brief automatism. Wordsworth's ...
-Genius. Part 19
330. And note further that as scientific introspection develops we are likely to receive fuller accounts of these concurrent mental processes, these partial externalisations of the creatures of the ...
-Genius. Part 20
333. I shall not attempt an anthology of such passages. We all know that their general tone supports, as far as it goes, the thesis here advanced: - namely, that moments of poetical inspiration are ...
-Genius. Part 21
335. But this conclusion points the way to a speculation more important still. Telæsthesia is not the only spiritual law, nor are subliminal uprushes affairs of the intellect alone. Beyond and above ...
-Genius. Part 22
337. On the other side I will appeal to Plato himself, giving a brief sketch merely of one of the leading passages {Symposium, 192-212) where the Platonic conception of love is set forth.1 Plato ...
-Genius. Part 23
338. Between the aspects of love here expressed in extreme terms, - the planetary aspect, if I may so term it, and the cosmical, - the choice is momentous. I do not indeed say that in our estimate of ...
-Genius. Part 24
341. The real difference between the two views appears when the faculties which I have called unknown come to be considered. If they are held to be real, my view is certainly the better able to ...
-Chapter IV. Sleep
- Pindar. 400. The preceding chapters have carried us two steps upon our way. In Chapter II (Disintegrations Of Personality). we gained some insight into the structure of human personality by ...
-Sleep. Part 2
404. This recuperative power, then, lies just beyond the red end of our spectrum of waking faculty. In that obscure region we note only added power; an increased control over organic functions at the ...
-Sleep. Part 3
406. Equally remarkable are the hypnopompic pictures, as I have termed them; those, namely, which accompany the departure of sleep. For it often happens (as in the cases cited by Gurney in Phantasms ...
-Sleep. Part 4
410. A still more striking illustration may be drawn from the following incident in the story of Dr. Krafft-Ebing's patient,4 lima S., the genuineness of whose stigmata seems proved by that physician'...
-Sleep. Part 5
412. The answer of actual experience to these questions is unexpectedly direct and clear. In every recorded instance - so far at least as my memory serves me, where there has been any unification ...
-Sleep. Part 6
414. I pass on to the still more novel and curious questions involved in the apparent existence of a dream-memory which, while accompanying the memory of ordinary life, seems also to have a wider ...
-Sleep. Part 7
416. I quote another case which raises a somewhat curious point as to the relation of what I may call the subliminal gaze to defects of ordinary vision. 1 See cases given in Appendix 415. 2 ...
-Sleep. Part 8
419. Starting, then, not from savage authority, but from the evidential scrutiny of modern facts, we shall find, I think, that there are coincidences of dream with truth which neither pure chance nor ...
-Sleep. Part 9
422. I will next refer to certain cases where the sleeper by clairvoyant vision discerns a scene of direct interest to a mind other than his own; as the danger or death of some near friend. Sometimes ...
-Sleep. Part 10
423. I next quote a case investigated by Edmund Gurney shortly before his death, and printed in S.P.R. Journal, vol. iii. pp. 265, 266. From Mr. R. V. Boyle, 3 Stanhope Terrace, W. July 30th, ...
-Sleep. Part 11
424. The single dream which a man has noted down in all his life stands evidentially in almost as good a position as a single waking hallucination. Compare the single dream noted down in all his life ...
-Sleep. Part 12
425. And here I feel bound to introduce some samples of a certain class of dreams, - more interesting, perhaps, and certainly more perplexing than any others; - but belonging to a category of ...
-Sleep. Part 13
427. Taking, then, Dr. Brace's case to bridge the interval between these two groups, I go on to a case which properly belongs to the second, though it still has much in common with the first. I shall ...
-Sleep. Part 14
428. In Mrs. Storie's case the whole experience, as we have seen, presented itself as a dream; yet as a dream of quite unusual type, like a series of pictures presented to the sleeper who was still ...
-Sleep. Part 15
429. These cases of invasion by the spirits of living persons pass on into cases of invasion by the dying, of which several instances are given in the next Appendix, the impression being generally ...
-Sleep. Part 16
431. The inference which all this evidence suggests is entirely in accordance with the hypothesis on which my whole work is based. I have assumed that man is an organism informed or possessed by a ...
-Chapter V. Hypnotism
- Homer. 500. A very complex subject must in this chapter be discussed with as much completeness as brevity will allow. It will be convenient to lay at once before the reader the main division...
-Hypnotism. Part 2
501. In the course of this study of human personality and human evolution, it is to be hoped that at every stage of our collection and discussion of evidence we may attain a somewhat wider conception ...
-Hypnotism. Part 3
503. Mesmer's experiment was almost a fool's experiment, and Mesmer himself was almost a charlatan. Yet Mesmer and his successors, working from many different points of view, and following many ...
-Hypnotism. Part 4
506. The leading figure among his immediate successors, the Marquis de Puységur, seems from his writings1 to have been one of the ablest and most candid men who have practised mesmerism; and he was ...
-Hypnotism. Part 5
510. We come next to the movement which is now on the whole dominant, and to which the greatest number of cures may at present be credited. The school of Nancy - which originated with Liébeault, and ...
-Hypnotism. Part 6
514. Now there exists a way of inducing hypnosis in some hysterical persons which seems intermediate between massive and localised stimulations. It is indeed a local stimulation; but there seems no ...
-Hypnotism. Part 7
516. From monotonous excitations which, whatever their part in inducing hypnosis, are, at any rate, such as can sensibly affect the organism, I come down to the trivial monotonies of watch-tickings, ...
-Hypnotism. Part 8
518. Self-suggestion, whatever this may really mean, is thus in most cases, whether avowedly or not, at the bottom of the effect produced. It has already been used most successfully, and it will ...
-Hypnotism. Part 9
520. Leaving perforce this problem for the present unsolved, let us consider other ways in which this conception of subliminal operation may throw light on the actual phenomena of hypnotism; - ...
-Hypnotism. Part 10
523. Gurney held the view that the main distinction of kind between his alert and his deep stage of hypnosis was to be found in the domain of memory, while memory also afforded the means for ...
-Hypnotism. Part 11
526. Let us then regard hypnotic suggestion as a summarised education, and consider over what range of inhibition and dynamogeny an ordinary education is expected to extend. I deal in Appendices with ...
-Hypnotism. Part 12
528. Among these morbid tricks kleptomania has an interest of its own, on account of the frequent doubt whether it is not put forward as a mere excuse for pilfering. It may thus happen that the cure ...
-Hypnotism. Part 13
533. The extirpation of tumours, however, is not the only purgative process which the bodily organism ever needs. And the psychical organism also - to continue our metaphor - is subject to many ...
-Hypnotism. Part 14
535. This suppression of pain has naturally been treated from the therapeutic point of view, as an end in itself; and neither physician nor patient has been inclined to inquire exactly what has ...
-Hypnotism. Part 15
536. It is to hypnotism in the first place that we may look for an increased power of analysis of these intercurrent streams, these irregularly superposed strata of our psychical being. In the ...
-Hypnotism. Part 16
539. I pass on to cases of the production by suggestion or self-suggestion of hyperæsthesia, - of a degree of sensory delicacy which overpasses the ordinary level, and the previous level of the ...
-Hypnotism. Part 17
541. As the result of these considerations, I approach alleged heteræsthesiae of various kinds with no presumption whatever against their real occurrence. Yet on the other hand, my belief in the ...
-Hypnotism. Part 18
544. The group of suggestive effects which we reach next in order is a wide and important one. The education of the central sensory faculties, of our power of inwardly representing to ourselves ...
-Hypnotism. Part 19
547. Another indication of the subliminal power at work to produce these hallucinations is their remarkable range - a range as wide, perhaps, as that over which therapeutic effects are obtainable by ...
-Hypnotism. Part 20
550. And now I come to the third main type of the dynamogenic efficacy of suggestion; - its influence, namely, on attention, on will, and on character; - character, indeed, being largely a resultant ...
-Hypnotism. Part 21
551. I speak of calculations subliminally performed in the carrying out of post-hypnotic suggestions. These suggestions à échéance - commands, given in the trance, to do something under ...
-Hypnotism. Part 22
554. In passing on from the influence of suggestion on attention to its influence on will, I am not meaning to draw any but the most everyday distinction between these two forms of inward ...
-Hypnotism. Part 23
556. These last words may naturally lead us on to our next topic: the influence of suggestion on character, - on that function of combined attention and will, which is, of course, also ultimately a ...
-Hypnotism. Part 24
557. Such an expectation is hardly legitimate without something of closer analysis. With no pretence at logic, but merely for the convenience of the present argument, we may divide known faults or ...
-Hypnotism. Part 25
560. Let us pause here to consider the point which we have already reached. We began by defining hypnotism as the empirical development of the sleeping phase of man's personality. In that sleeping ...
-Hypnotism. Part 26
564. The group of sleep-waking cases which we may next discuss illustrate a natural evolution of the faculty of the sleeping phase of personality. The subliminal self, exercising in sleep a ...
-Hypnotism. Part 27
568. The fact is, that since the days of those old controversies between mesmerists proper and hypnotists proper, the conditions of the controversy have greatly changed. The supposed mesmeric ...
-Hypnotism. Part 28
570. With all our later evidence in view, however, - with so much proof of a transmission from man to man of something which needs no action of the finger-tips, - it would be natural indeed to ...
-Hypnotism. Part 29
574. Our survey of that important, though inchoate, appeal to the subliminal self which passes under the name of hypnotism is now nearly as complete - in its brief sketchy form - as the present state ...
-Hypnotism. Part 30
577. Nor, again, is this attempt to rise above pain at all exclusively dependent upon the Christian revelation. Mind-healing is a generalised term which includes not only so-called Christian ...
-Hypnotism. Part 31
579. These words will sound, perhaps, needlessly severe. Corruptio optimi pessima. It is hard to keep the balance when one sees, as one surely does at Lourdes, forces - which, if rightly directed, ...
-Hypnotism. Part 32
581. In my view, then, each man is essentially a spirit, controlling an organism which is itself a complex of lower and smaller lives. The spirit's control is not uniform throughout the organism, nor ...
-Hypnotism. Part 33
582. If this be so, there may be a truth - deeper than we can at this moment stay to discuss - in many subjective experiences of poets, philosophers, mystics, saints. And if their sense of inflowing ...
-Chapter VI. Sensory Automatism
Bo à a ' óo ai 600. We have ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 2
601. We have come to a point where we need some further colligating generalisation; some conception under which these scattered phenomena may be gathered and exhibited in their true kinship. Some ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 3
603. We start from a region below the specialisation of visual faculty. The study of the successive dermal and nervous modifications which have led up to that faculty belongs to Biology, and all that ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 4
610. Here at any rate the commonly admitted category of stages of inward vision will close. Thus far and no farther the brain's capacity for presenting visual images can be pushed on under the ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 5
612. Yet until quite recently - until, in short, Edmund Gurney took up the inquiry in 1882 - this wide, important subject was treated, even in serious text-books, in a superficial and perfunctory way....
-Sensory Automatism. Part 6
614. Hazardous as these speculations may seem, they nevertheless represent an attempt to get our notions of supersensory things as near down to our notions of sensory things as we fairly can. ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 7
617. The next step is one to which, as the reader of my chapter on hypnotism already knows, I attribute an importance much greater than is generally accorded to it. I refer to the hypnotiser's power ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 8
618. It is by considering hallucinations in this generalised manner and among these analogies, that we can best realise their absence of necessary connection with any bodily degeneration or disease. ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 9
620. Crystal-vision, then, like hypnotic trance, might have been gradually evolved by a series of reasoned experiments, along an unexceptionable scientific road. In reality, of course, this ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 10
622. These things being so - both these causes being apparently operative along the whole series of scryers, or crystal-gazers, from the most unstable to the most scientific - one might be tempted ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 11
626. The crystal-visions which the reader will find in detail in those Appendices have been in one sense logically placed at this point in my argument. We are discussing the control of inward vision, ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 12
629. To make such experiment possible has indeed been no easy matter. It has been needful to elicit and to isolate from the complex emotions and interactions of common life a certain psychical ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 13
632. We must clearly realise that in telepathic experiment we encounter just the same difficulty which makes our results in hypnotic therapeutics so unpredictable and irregular. We do not know how to ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 14
635. The hypothesis which I suggested in Phantasms of the Living itself, in my Note on a possible mode of psychical interaction, seems to me to have been rendered increasingly plausible by evidence ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 15
638. The evidence, then, leading me thus unresisting along, has led me to this main difference from our early treatment of veridical phantasms. Instead of starting from a root-conception of a ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 16
640. Dissociation of personality, combined with activity in the tnetetherial environment; such, in the phraseology used in this book, will be the formula which will most easily cover those actually ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 17
643. In forming this conclusion, apparitions at death are of course selected, because, death being an unique event in man's earthly existence, the coincidences between death and apparitions afford a ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 18
644 I must begin with cases where the action of the excursive fragment of the personality is of the weakest kind - the least capable of affecting other observers, or of being recalled into the agent'...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 19
645. But there are other cases where a man's phantasm is seen in a place where there is no special reason for his appearing, although these places seem always to lie within the beat and circuit of ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 20
646. And we now come to other cases, where the percipience has been collective, although it has not been repeated. Here is a case where two persons at one moment - a moment of no stress or excitement ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 21
647. In the following case the apparition was seen by its original and by others at the same time. The account (taken from Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 217) came from Mrs. Hall, of The Yews, ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 22
649. Let us apply the view to one of our most bizarre and puzzling cases - that of Canon Bourne (see 645 D). Here I conceive that Canon Bourne, while riding in the hunting-field, was also ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 23
650. And now let us pass on from these psychorrhagic cases, which hardly concern anybody beyond the phantom-begetter himself - and do not even add anything to his own knowledge - to cases where there ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 24
At about 4.30 that night, or rather Monday morning, Reddell looked at her watch, poured out the medicine, and was bending over the bed to give it to Helen, when the call-bell in the passage rang. She ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 25
651. I give in 651 A a somewhat similar case, where there is strong attestation that a sailor, watching by a dying comrade, saw figures around his hammock, apparently representing the dying man's ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 26
652. And here I note a gradual transition to the next large class of cases on which I am about to enter. I am about to deal with teloesthesia; - with cases where an agent-percipient - for he is both ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 27
653. These ponderings on projected suicide form perhaps the strongest instance of mental preoccupation with a particular spot. But of course, in our ignorance of the precise quality of thought or ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 28
656. I add another arrival-case in 656 A. But before leaving the subject I must remind the reader that among telæsthetic cases we have already encountered some where a percipient seemed to have ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 29
659. This tendency to subliminal symbolism, indeed, has met us at each point of our inquiry. As an instance of it in its simplest form, I may mention a case where a botanical student passing ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 30
661. These long clairvoyant wanderings are more nearly paralleled by dreams than by waking hallucinations. And among dreams (cited in Chapter IV (Sleep).) we have already seen some cases much ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 31
662. There are, on the other hand, a good many cases where a scene thus discerned in a flash is one of special interest to the percipient, although no one in the scene may have actually wished to ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 32
663. It is likely enough that, if we could really understand the mechanism involved, some of these questions would be seen to be not indeed merely verbal - but beside the point. If each of us is a ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 33
664. The decedent in the next case was a man of some note, who would, I think, have been anxious to manifest his continued existence if he found that possible. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. i....
-Sensory Automatism. Part 34
665. We now come, then, to that class of cases where B invades A, and A perceives the invasion; but B retains no memory of it in supraliminal life. From one point of view, as will be seen, this is ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 35
Of course, I was under the impression my friend was dead. Such, however, was not the case; and I met him some four years later, when, without telling him anything of my experience in Cairo, I asked hi...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 36
666. Of still greater interest is the class which comes next in order in my ascending scale of apparent intensity, the cases, namely, where there is recollection on both sides, so that the ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 37
668. Lastly, the lessons of these spontaneous apparitions have been confirmed and widened by actual experiment. It is plain that just as we are not confined to noting small spontaneous telepathic ...
-Sensory Automatism. Part 38
669. In these experimental apparitions, which form, as it were, the spolia opima of the collector, we naturally wish to know all that we can about each detail in the experience. Two important points ...
-Appendices To Chapter II. Disintegrations Of Personality
207 A. Some striking cases of forgotten terrors giving rise to hysterical attacks, which have been cured by the skilful use of hypnotic suggestion, are given in Drs. Raymond and Janet's Névroses et ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 2
221 A. It is well known that a great variety of slight causes - hunger, fatigue, slight poisoning by impure air, a small degree of fever, etc. - are sometimes enough to produce a transient ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 3
Experience C The next night the other fellow had an explanation ready for my sufferings, of which I can only say that it had something to do with the navy, that it was sheer undiluted nonsense, had...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 4
222 A. A good example of the application of true scientific method to problems which doctors of the old school did not think worth their science is Dr. Janet's treatment of a singular problem which ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 5
Compare with this the mediaeval case of Soeur Jeanne (832 B). Professor Flournoy's subject Hélène Smith (834-842) is another instance of pseudo-possession, though not by imaginary demons. 2...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 6
224 A. The following case of involuntary crime committed by a boy named Sörgel, in a state of secondary consciousness, is summarised from an account given in the paper by Dr. Elliotson, already ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 7
225 A. A full account of the well-known case of Ansel Bourne was first published in the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vii. pp. 221-58, in a paper by Dr. Hodgson, entitled A Case of Double Consciousness. ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 8
He was especially punctual in the closing of his store at 9 p.m. on ordinary week-days, and at 10 p.m. on Saturday. He attended the Methodist church on Sunday, and on one occasion, at a religious meet...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 9
On the next day we endeavoured to obtain a detailed account from him, while in the trance state, of his doings during the eight weeks, January 17th to March 13th, 1887. The following statements2 were ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 10
It will be seen from the account which Mr. Newbold obtained of the conversations which Mr. Brown had with Mrs. Kellogg and the waiter, Mr. Jackson, that Mr. Bourne in his secondary state recollected...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 11
226 A. This case was reported by Dr. Proust, Professor of Hygiene at the Hotel Dieu of Paris, before the Académic des Sciences Morales et Politiques, as an instance of what he called ambulatory ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 12
228 A. The next case is taken from an article entitled Duplex Personality: Report of a Case, by William F. Drewry, M.D., of Petersburg, Virginia, U.S.A., in the Medico- Legal Journal for June 1896: ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 13
229 A. The following case is taken from the paper by Dr. Elliotson referred to in 223 A and 224 A (Zoist, vol. iv. p. 185), being quoted by him from the Northern Journal of Medicine for June 1845. ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 14
230 A. We next come to cases of factitious secondary personalities, developed apparently from self-suggestions in the hypnotic state. I give first the classic case of Professor Pierre Janet's patient,...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 15
There are, however, even now striking differences between the characters of Léonie and Léontine. This poor peasant, says Professor Janet, is in her normal state a serious and somewhat melancholy...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 16
This is plainly a state of so-called ecstasy; but it differs from the ecstasy common in hysterical attacks in one capital point. Not only is it remembered indistinctly, perhaps - by Léonore, who descr...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 17
Thus far, however, the knowledge gained as to Lucie 3 was not direct but inferential. The nature of the commands which she could execute showed her to be capable of attention and memory; but there was...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 18
Lucie was thrown into catalepsy; then M. Janet clenched her left hand (she began at once to strike out), put a pencil in her right hand, and said, Adrienne, what are you doing? The left hand continu...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 19
230 C. Other cases of multiple personality developed in connection with the hypnotic trance have been studied by Professor Pierre Janet's brother, Dr. Jules Janet, and were described by the latter in ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 20
231 A. I give next the case of Dr. Azam's often quoted patient, Fé1ida X.1 In this case the somnambulic life finally became the normal life; as the second state, which appeared at first only in ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 21
231 B. The following is another case in which the faculties appeared to be heightened in the secondary condition. The account is taken from the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. iv. pp. 230-32. The case was ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 22
Thus it continued for five weeks, when one morning after a protracted sleep, she awoke and was herself again. She recognised the parental, the brotherly, and sisterly ties as though nothing had happen...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 23
233 A. We now come to spontaneous cases of multiplex personality,1 of which Louis Vivé's is one of the best known. Louis Vive exhibited an extraordinary number and variety of phases of personality, ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 24
234 A. The following account of Dr. Morton Prince's patient, the Misses Beauchamp, is slightly abridged from his report to the International Congress of Psychology, Paris, August, 1900, which was ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 25
B. III. always insisted upon having her eyes opened, complaining that she wished to see, and had a right to see. One day, some time after this, when she was at home, owing to some nervous excitement...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 26
Although B. I. knows nothing of Sally, Sally not only is conscious of Miss Beauchamp's thoughts at the moment they arise, but she is capable, as I have said, of controlling her thoughts and her arms a...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 27
Sally, too, who knows the inmost soul of Miss Beauchamp, says she changed after that night. So it follows that the Miss Beauchamp who has been the object of this study, has been educated in college...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 28
B. IV. is a very different character from either Sally or Miss Beauchamp. A study of the different habits of thought, tastes, and emotions of these three people, has thrown, I believe, much light upon...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 29
Now any theory we adopt must explain all this, as well as the particular forms of amnesia and continuities of memory. The explanation which I believe to be the correct one is this: neither B. I. nor B...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 30
236 A. The case of Mollie Fancher was recorded in a book by Judge Abram H. Dailey, entitled Mollie Fancher: the Brooklyn Enigma. An Authentic Statement of Facts in the Life of Mary J. Fancher, the ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 31
237 A. The following account is taken from the Report of Dr. Ira Barrows on the Case of Miss Anna Winsor. Extracts from this Report were made by Dr. C. W. Fillmore, and sent to the American Society ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 32
October 25th After a spasm, becomes speechless. October 26th One spasm lasting one hour; still speechless. 27th Sleeps all day, but occasionally screams as from pain. Rouses in evening ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 33
20th To 23rd Daily spasms, but not so severe. 24th Raving delirium; imagines herself a dog; barks and growls. 26th Awakes delirious. At 5.30 a.m. has a spasm lasting until 8 o'clock. Al...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 34
238 A. A detailed record of the case of Mary Lurancy Vennum was originally given in the Religio-Philosophical Journal in 1879, and shortly afterwards published in pamphlet form under the title The ...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 35
[On the following morning, Friday, February 1st, Mr. Vennum called at the office of Mr. Roff and informed him that the girl claimed to be Mary Roff, and wanted to go home. He said, She seems like a c...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 36
It will be remembered that the family moved to Texas in 1857. Mr. Roff asked Mary if she remembered moving to Texas or anything about it. Yes, pa, and I remember crossing Red River and of seeing a gr...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 37
Mary is to leave the body of Rancy to-day, about eleven o'clock, so she says. She is bidding neighbours and friends good-bye. Rancy to return home all right to-day. Mary came from her room upstairs,...
-Appendix. Disintegrations Of Personality. Part 38
Mrs. Minerva Alter said that the mannerisms and behaviour of Lurancy when under the control resembled those of her sister Mary. Lurancy Vennum knew Mrs. Alter previously as Mrs. Alter, having met her ...
-Appendices To Chapter IV. Sleep
407 A. In illustration of the occasional heightening of the sensory faculties in dreams, I give the following case, described by Dr. Hodgson: - July 30th, 1900. One of the most vivid experiences ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 2
415 A. The following is a case of a lost object, where waking effort soon after the loss fails to recall any supraliminal knowledge of the place of deposit. The account is quoted from the Journal S.P....
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 3
417 A. Here is a case in which a difficult problem in bookkeeping, which had baffled the narrator's waking endeavours, was solved during sleep. I quote it from the Zoist, vol. viii. p. 328. It was ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 4
417 B. Some striking cases in which, during sleep, complex inferences have been drawn, from data presumably present to the waking mind, with more than waking intelligence, were recorded by Professor ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 5
417 C. The following account is also taken from Professor New-bold's paper, just quoted. He writes: - For [these] cases I am indebted to another friend and colleague, Dr. Herman V. Hilprecht, ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 6
As it had been originally of finely veined agate, the stone-cutter's saw had accidentally divided the object in such a way that the whitish vein of the stone appeared only upon the one fragment and th...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 7
421 A. In the case next to be quoted, in which a young man sees in a dream the place where his friend's watch has fallen in a field, it might be suggested that the loser's subliminal self had seen ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 8
421 B. The next case also points to an extension of the dreamer's perception. It is taken from the Journal S.P.R., vol. iv. p. 210. Mr. Podmore, who obtained the account, wrote: - Mr. Watts, who ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 9
421 C. Again this quasi-instinctive knowledge, realised on awaking from sleep, of the mutilation of a secluded statue may be compared with cases where a seer becomes aware of the position of a dead ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 10
421 D. In the following case, the dream conveys information concerning past business transactions, entirely unknown to the dreamer, and which, had the dream been true, might have seriously affected ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 11
421 F. The next case is analogous to the preceding one, and may also be explained by supposing that the subliminal self of the dreamer had some perception of the schooner and the shipwrecked crew. It ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 12
421 G. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. viii. p. 140. The following statement of experiences by Miss Luke was sent to us by Dr. R. Osgood Mason, of New York, author of Telepathy and the Subliminal Self. ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 13
421 H. The following case is taken from Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xiv. p. 279. It comes from Sir Lawrence Jones, Bart.; the account having been written on the day of the incident. Ventnor, March ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 14
422 A. The following account (taken from Phantasms of the Living, vol. i. p. 202) comes from Mrs. West, of Hildegarde, Furness Road, Eastbourne. It was written in 1883. My father and brother were ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 15
422 B. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. v. p. 40. The following narrative was sent to us by the Right Hon. Sir John Drummond Hay, K.C.B., G.C.M.G., who was for many years H.M.'s Minister in Marocco and ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 16
424 A. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. v. p. 61. The account comes from Mr. Edward Crewdson, jun., of Tuckerville, Chester Co., Nebraska, U.S.A. Mr. Crewdson explains that at the time of the ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 17
424 C. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. v. p. 252. The following narrative was sent to Dr. Hodgson by Mr. William Tudor: - Auburndale, Mass., July 11th, 1890. Your favour of the 30th ult, ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 18
425 B. In the next case (taken from Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xi. p. 509), the precognition does not refer to a danger threatening the percipient himself; there is, moreover, an element of ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 19
In conclusion I will say that the heaviness of feeling that so oppressed me has all disappeared. I have never felt that peculiar, that indescribable weight that was crushing out my very life, since Su...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 20
425 C. In some cases the premonitory dream, although it may have made a vivid impression, and perhaps have even been narrated to others, is then apparently clean forgotten until the moment of its ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 21
425 D. Here again is a case where a somewhat complex scene, involving the action of several persons, is dreamt and narrated beforehand. It is quoted from Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xi. p. 491, the ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 22
425 E. I shall conclude this group with a case (quoted from Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xi. p. 577) where there is again a suggestion of personal guardianship and care. But the facts prefigured do not ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 23
Then I thought of that scene on the staircase, which had always remained in my mind. I asked if there were any bruises on the hands. No bruises, said my step-father, either on hands or face. He th...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 24
426 A. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. i. p. 384. The next account, which first appeared in a letter in the Religio-Philosophical Journal, is from Dr. Bruce, of Micanopy, Fla., U.S.A. The case ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 25
428 A. The following are cases illustrating my hypothesis of psychical invasion. The first is taken from Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 105. In this case, the words heard were vividly ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 26
428 B. In the following case (quoted from the Journal S.P.R., vol. vii. p. 100) there seems to have been on the part of the agent, Mrs. Manning, a spontaneous revival of memory of long past and ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 27
428 D. The following account (taken from Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 154) was received through the kindness of the late Mr. G. J. Romanes, F.R.S., who was well acquainted with the narrator. ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 28
428 E. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xi. p. 444. Mrs. Tabour writes to Dr. Hodgson; - 2718 Chicago Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn., May 8th, 1895. I have recently learned of a case of remarkable ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 29
428 F. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. viii. p. 128. The first account which follows is taken from an article on Dreams, by Miss Giddings, which appeared in The Metaphysical Magazine for September ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 30
429 A. The following case is quoted from Phantasms of the Living, vol. i. p. 365. The account is written by Mr. N. T. Menneer, Principal of Torre College, Torquay: - December 18th, 1883. I ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 31
429 B. The next case (quoted from Phantasms of the Living, vol. i. p. 453) is from Mrs. Lightfoot, a lady who was none the worse witness because she took not the slightest interest in our work. The ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 32
429 C. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. i. p. 199. As to the evidential force of this case, I may point out that the percipient states the experience to have been unique in his life; and that the ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 33
429 D. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. v. p. 420.2 From Miss Richardson, 47 Bedford Gardens, Kensington, W. The writer is a very worthy wife of a shopkeeper, who told me the occurrence some years ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 34
429 E. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vi. p. 341. Communicated by Fräulein Schneller, sister-in-law of the percipient, and known to F. \V. H. M., January 1890. Dober und Pause, Schlesien, December ...
-Appendix. Sleep. Part 35
429 F. From the Journal S.F.R., vol. viii. p. 123. The account was sent to Dr. Hodgson by Mr. A. E. Dolbear, Professor of Physics in Tufts College, Mass. Tufts College, Mass., April 11th, 1895. ...
-Appendices To Chapter V. Hypnotism
509 A. The following criticism of the Salpêtrière School is taken from an article by Dr. J. Milne Bramwell on What is Hypnotism ? in the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xii. pp. 205-209. Charcot's ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 2
According to Liébeault, the difference between the sexes is rather less than I per cent. The majority of Esdaile's subjects were men, and, as we have seen, Mr. Wingfield was able to hypnotise about 80...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 3
512 C. The following is a somewhat similar case of self-suggestion where the suggestibility was apparently heightened under the influence of opium, which at the same time developed a monitory ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 4
513 C. Some experiments on young children, designed to test the reality of the alleged mesmeric effluence, were carried out by Dr. Ltebeault, as described in the chapter on Zoomagnetism in his Thé...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 5
518 C. Professor Forel, in Un cas d'Auto-hypnotisation (Revue de l'Hypnotisme, March 1889), records that he has himself been several times in a cataleptoid state, which - in his own view - is ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 6
522 A. The artificial character of Charcot's three stages of hypnotism is well shown by the further development of one of his best known subjects in the hands of Dr. Jules Janet - brother of ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 7
522 B. The following are extracts, slightly abridged, from a paper by Edmund Gurney on The Stages of Hypnotism in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. ii. pp. 61 et seq. Before the hypnotised subject ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 8
523 A. In the paper just quoted Gurney maintained that the phenomena needed to establish the distinction between his alert and deep stages were to be found in the domain of memory, much of the ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 9
523 B. Gurney's experiments, quoted above, on stages of memory in the hypnotic trance were several times repeated by Mrs. Sidgwick and Miss Johnson in the course of their experiments on thought-...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 10
526 A. The following is a case of apparent pre-natal suggestion recorded by Dr. Liébeault in the Revue de l'Hypnoiisme, August 1891, p. 53. The child in question is a girl of eleven. On her left ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 11
526 C. The next case is taken from an article entitled Maternal Impressions and their Influence upon the Foetus in Utero, by Claudius Henry Maston, M.D., of Mobile, Ala., in The Medical News, vol. ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 12
527 A. According to Dr. Edgar Bérillon, who was the first systematically to apply the hypnotic method to the education of children (see his paper, De la Suggestion envisagée au point de vue pé...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 13
527 B. Nervous troubles in adults have often been cured by the same means. Thus, in the Revue de l'Hypnotisme, September 1899, P- 73, Dr. Vlavianos records a case of tic convulsif cured by hypnotic ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 14
529 A. Alcoholism, as the vice which least easily escapes notice, is that which medical practitioners have most frequently endeavoured to combat. The list of specifics alleged to cure drunkenness is ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 15
530 A. There are many instances of the cure of morphinomania. I select the following (recorded by Dr. Marot in the Revue de l'Hypnotisme, February 1893) on account of the psychological interest of ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 16
532 B. In the Revue de l'Hypnotisme, July 1899, p. 11, Dr. Vlavianos reports a case of agoraphobia cured by hypnotic suggestion. Victor L., fifty-two years old. Bad hereditary conditions. His ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 17
532 D. In a paper On Imperative Ideas, published in Brain (Summer and Autumn, 1895), Dr. Bramwell gives a brief historical account and discussion of different varieties of phobies, etc, and a list ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 18
534 A. In some articles in the Revue Philosophique, published in 1886 and 1887, Delboeuf described some experiments with two maid-servants of his own, whom he calls M. and J. Both were strong healthy ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 19
534 D. Dr. Hamilton Osgood reports four cases of eczema cured by hypnotic suggestion {Revue de l'Hypnotisme, 1895, p. 300), and it seems probable that in the following extraordinary case of the cure ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 20
535 B. On the other hand, compare the following case recorded by Dr. J. Milne Bramwell in his Personally observed Hypnotic Phenomena (Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xii. p. 193). Miss A. I had ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 21
538 B. I quote the following observations as to the improvement of muscular powers and of the senses during hypnosis from Dr. Bramwell's Personally observed Hypnotic Phenomena (Proceedings S.P.R., ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 22
538 D. The mystery of the organic effects of hypnotism lies bound up with the mystery of the Restitution of Function. Functions of the brain - motor, sensory, intellectual - which have been destroyed ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 23
540 A. The probable course of evolution of early sense-organs is thus described by Prince Kropotkin in an article on Recent Science in the Nineteenth Century for August 1896: - In order to trace ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 24
541 B. An exhaustive and impartial survey of the existing evidence for the faculty of dowsing is given in Professor W. F. Barrett's two articles On the So-called Divining Rod in the Proceedings S....
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 25
541 D. Considering in the next place the alleged sensibility of certain persons to crystals and magnets, - known to be absolutely inert in relation to ordinary men, - we should note the alleged ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 26
541 F. And now I pass on to a third concurrent line of inference, derived from a set of experiments which seem in a sense to stand midway between the two classes just mentioned, - the telepathic, ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 27
541 H. The following case was sent to me by Professor Richet, and was first printed in the Journal S.P.R., vol. iv. p. 91. The sensitive employed was one of the three mentioned in 541 G. Paris, le ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 28
541 K. Medicamentous substances have also been claimed by many different hypnotists as exerting from a little distance, or when in sealed tubes, specific influences on patients. The phenomenon is of ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 29
542 A. We now come to the effects of hypnotic suggestion in producing certain definite changes in the vaso-motor system, in glands and secretions, etc. I give a few examples in this and the two next ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 30
543 A. The best known and in some respects best observed modern case of stigmatisation is that of Louise Lateau. In spite of Virchow's famous alternative with regard to this case, ou supercherie, ou ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 31
543 B. Three cases of the production of cruciform marks reported by Dr. Biggs, of Lima, appeared in the Journal S.P.R., vol. iii. p. 100, and I quote one of them. October 18th, 1885. ... ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 32
543 D. In the following case the intellectual character, as I have termed it, of the organic process which responds to suggestion is illustrated in a striking and complex way. Mdlle. lima S., a ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 33
543 F. The following is an abstract of Dr. Levillain's account of an experiment performed by Professor Charcot before a large class at the Salpêtrière 3: - 1 From Experiments in Clairvoyance, by ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 34
549 A. In the so-called transposition of the senses it is claimed that stimuli which normally affect only one particular sense-organ affect some other part of the body; e.g. when letters are said ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 35
551 A. The following examples of post-hypnotic suggestions involving calculations are quoted from Gurney's paper, Peculiarities of certain Post-Hypnotic States, in the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. iv. ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 36
The reasonable interpretation of the result is surely that he was in some way actually counting the days as they passed. In the next case, which occurred after the above remarks were written, I got...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 37
551 B. Professor Delboeufs experiments, recorded in the paper entitled De l'Appreciation du Temps par les Somnambules, in the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. viii. pp. 414-421, were directed simply ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 38
Experiment No. 5 Wednesday, December 18th, 3.45 p.m. Suggestion in 24 hours, 2880 minutes. Result 3.45 p.m., Saturday, December 21st. Correct.... Experiment No. 9 December 31st, 1895, 4...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 39
On twenty-four occasions Miss A. was asked to calculate [in hypnosis] when the suggestions fell due; she was wrong in the first nine instances, but in the remaining fifteen right in eleven and wrong i...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 40
552 B. From Dr. J. Milne Bramwell's Personally Observed Hypnotic Phenomena (Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xii. p. 194). In response to suggestion the subject may recall the events of waking life to a ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 41
555 A. The question of hypnotic crimes was thoroughly discussed by Dr. Liébeault in his book, Du Sommeil et des Etats Analogues (1866). Later, Dr. Liégeois, whose speciality is medical ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 42
555 B. Dr. Bramwell points out (see What is Hypnotism? in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xii. pp. 204-58) that his own views as to the complete independence of the hypnotised subject's will had been long ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 43
556 A. Some of the most striking cases of moral reforms produced by hypnotic suggestion are those recorded by Dr. Auguste Voisin. For instance: - In the summer of 1884 there was at the Salpêtrière ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 44
563 A. Rachel Baker,1 one of the most noted sleeping preachers, was born at Pelham, in Massachusetts, in 1794. Her parents were Presbyterians of limited means, and the chief element in her ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 45
565 A. The following case of clairvoyance during spontaneous somnambulism was published by Dr. Dufay in a paper in the Revue Philosophique for February 1889, a translation of which appeared in ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 46
The following night he related how he saw on the Glény road the body of a man, who had been drowned while bathing in the Creuse, and that he was being brought to Guéret in a carriage. Next day I made ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 47
568 A. The subject of these experiments in telepathic hypnotisation was Professor Pierre Janet's well-known subject, Madame B. (Léonie see 230 A, etc.) and the first experiments were carried out ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 48
II. On the morning of the 22nd, however, we again selected by lot an hour (11 a.m.) at which M. Gibert should will, from his dispensary, which is close to his house, that Madame B. should go to sleep ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 49
We have thus nineteen coincidences and six failures - the failures all more or less explicable by special circumstances. During Madame B.'s visits to Havre, about two months in all, she once f...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 50
568 D. The next case is quoted from Dr. Dufay's paper already referred to {Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vi. p. 411). The author's caution in interpreting the phenomena adds to the value of his ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 51
568 E. In the Zoist for April 1849 Mr. Adams, a surgeon of Lymington, writing four months after the event, describes how a guest of his own twice succeeded in mesmerising the man-servant of a common ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 52
569 A. The production of local anaesthesia and rigidity is a common phenomenon, familiar to all hypnotic operators as the result of a definite verbal suggestion, and one that can also be produced in ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 53
569 B. Further experiments of the kind just described were carried out by Mrs. H. Sidgwick in 1890 and 1892 with the help of the same hypnotist, Mr. G. A. Smith, in the course of her experiments on ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 54
569 C. Several sets of experiments are recorded in the S.P.R. Proceedings 1 in which the subject's power of response to a question was shown to be under the control of the unspoken will of the ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 55
571 A. Different observers take different views of rapport. Bernheim and Liébeault believe that a real rapport exists between the subject and the operator, and that this follows as a natural ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 56
571 C. Mr. M. Guthrie, whose experiments in thought-transference with persons in a normal waking condition are given in 630 B, found that community of sensation sometimes existed between persons in ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 57
572 A. The following case is quoted from Mrs. Sidgwick's paper On the Evidence for Clairvoyance in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vii. pp. 30-99. It is one of a group of four cases given by Mrs. ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 58
572 B. The Zoist, vol. vii. pp. 95 - 101, contains a similar case, communicated by Mr. E. H. Barth, of the finding of a lost brooch by means of the noted clairvoyant Ellen Dawson. The account is ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 59
But, as at different times they guessed all the numbers between 90 and 100, we believe that they were not aware that our series stopped at 90, in which case their chance of being right in a single gue...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 60
[The nature and development of the percipients' impressions are fully discussed. Miss B.'s impressions were mostly visual, and generally seemed to develop gradually. Sometimes her eyes were opened, an...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 61
[The following are five experiments made with P.: - ] As a preliminary to each experiment, P. was hypnotised and told by Mr. Smith that he would see a picture, then had his eyes opened, and was giv...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 62
573 B. In Mrs. Sidgwick's paper On the Evidence for Clairvoyance in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vii. pp. 30-99, an account is given of several striking cases of travelling clairvoyance on the part ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 63
573 C. Dr. Alfred Backman, of Kalmar, Sweden, published a paper on Experiments in Clairvoyance in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vii. pp. 199-220. His subjects were patients of his own, hypnotised by him ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 64
573 E. From Facts in Clairvoyance, by Dr. Ashburner (Zoist, vol. vi. pp. 96-110). In the following case the information given by the clairvoyants related to facts which were apparently not known by ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 65
575 A. The following account of experiments in the efficacy of charms appeared in the Journal S.P.R., vol. vi. p. 152: - ... The uncivilised Africans, among whom I have spent many years (sixteen), ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 66
578 A. The following account of the Lourdes legend was given by me in an article in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. ix. pp. 176-82. Let us begin by examining the three essential factors of the Lourdes ...
-Appendix. Hypnotism. Part 67
The miracle of the taper, therefore, if truly reported, may show that Bernadette was a medium, but cannot fairly be used to prove the action of the Virgin Mary. Still less safe would it be to app...
-Appendices To Chapter VI. Sensory Automatism
603 A. Since Mr. Galton's well-known work we have become familiar with number-forms and other visual schemata of thought, which tend to shape themselves in many minds. These number-forms involve ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 2
607 A. The distinction between after-images and memory-images, although sometimes neglected by careless writers, is a marked one; since after-images, properly so called, are a form of entoptic vision,...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 3
612 A. Summary Of The Report On The Census Of Hallucinations The Census of Hallucinations was undertaken in 1889 by a Committee of the S.P.R., under the direction of Professor Sidgwick, and ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 4
A more important source of error has next to be considered, namely, for-getfulness; either a temporary and superficial forgetfulness, which may lead people to answer No when further care and thought...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 5
On the other hand, to obtain a fair estimate of the total number of recognised apparitions of living persons which had actually occurred, in order to compare these with the number of death-coincidence...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 6
620 A. The following historical résumé is derived from Mr. Andrew Lang's The Making of Religion (Chapter V (Hypnotism)., Crystal Visions, Savage and Civilised, p. 90), and Miss A. Goodrich-Freer's ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 7
623 A. The following account of optical effects observed in her crystal visions is given by Miss Goodrich-Freer {Proceedings S.P.R., vol. viii. p. 485). These experiments have been for the most ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 8
624 A. The following is an account (taken from Proceedings S.P.R., vol. viii. p. 459) of experiments in crystal vision made by myself with two of the hypnotic subjects of Gurney and Mrs. Sidgwick, ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 9
5. I next told P. (hypnotised) the story of Robinson Crusoe finding the footprint and fearing savages. I told T. that Moses Primrose took a cow to the fair and returned with a gross of green specta...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 10
11. I now resolved to supply the message myself (same conditions), and told him that he would be able to see the lengths of the words with the naked eye, and to read them with the magnifier. The teleg...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 11
14. In the next experiment (same conditions) the theme, written down by me, which S. was mentally to suggest, was acrobats swinging from trapeze. Neither P. nor T. saw anything at first. They were r...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 12
625 A. I quote next a record of crystal visions by Mrs. A. W. Verrall, a lecturer at Newnham College, and known to the classical world as the translator of Pausanias. Mrs. Verrall made the ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 13
625 B. The following cases are extracted from Miss A. Goodrich-Freer's paper on Recent Experiments in Crystal Vision (Proceedings S.P.R., vol. v., 1889, pp. 505-519). Miss Goodrich-Freer classifies ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 14
625 C. The following case is extracted from Proceedings S.P.R., vol. viii. pp. 499-515. In this case, crystal-vision has formed but a small part of a long and complex group of phenomena centring ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 15
C. Sir Joseph Barnby Writes As Follows November 1892. I was invited by Lord and Lady Radnor to the wedding of their daughter, Lady Wilma Bouverie, which took place August 15, 1889. I was ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 16
Case C (Lord L. At Prayers) This incident has been independently recounted to me both by Lady Radnor and by Miss A. herself. Another small point not given by Sir J. Barnby is that Miss A. did not a...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 17
M. Retrocognitive Scene Mrs. A. gives the following account: In October 1886 my daughter saw in the stone in her bracelet a scene which considerably impressed me, as it was one which I at once ide...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 18
625 D. The following accounts are extracts from Mr. Andrew Lang's Making of Religion (1898). Mr. Lang tells us that he made the acquaintance of the lady whom he calls Miss Angus early in 1897; he ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 19
630 A. Note On Number-Habits Some critics of the experimental evidence for thought-transference have attempted to show that a large proportion of the successes obtained may be due, not to ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 20
630 B. The first experimental study of thought-transference was connected with the discovery that the somnambulistic state could be artificially induced, and the greater number of observations made ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 21
Mr. Guthriés Experiments Full records of these experiments were published in the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. i. pp. 263-283; vol. ii. pp. 1-5,. 24-42, 189-200; vol. iii. pp. 424-452. The account here ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 22
I give a few specimens - not unduly favourable ones, but illustrating the spreading of responsibility to which Mr. Guthrie refers. The agents concerned were Mr. Guthrie; Mr. Steel, the President of ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 23
Soon after the publication of these results, Mr. Guthrie was fortunate enough to obtain the active co-operation of Dr. Oliver J. Lodge, Professor of Physics in University College, Liverpool, who carri...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 24
630 C. Mr. Henry G. Rawsoris Experiments} Mr. Rawson had previously been successful as percipient in several short sets of experiments in card-guessing with different agents. In the paper referred ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 25
630 D. Comparatively few cases have been recorded on good evidence of the experimental transference of impressions when the agent and percipient were in different places, and their value, of course, ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 26
At the fourth trial (1st May), Miss G. records the same night that she saw a broken circle, then only patches of faint light, not cloudlike, but flat, which alternated with vertical streaks of pale l...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 27
630 E. Mr. A. Glardon's Experiments The following experiments in the transference of diagrams were carried out by the Rev. A. Glardon, of Tour-de-Peilz, Vaud, Switzerland, as agent, with a friend ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 28
630 F. We have as yet received very few cases of anything like a series of telepathic messages. One carefully reported case, carried out by Miss Goodrich-Freer with a friend of hers, was given in her ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 29
630 G. Miss Despard's Experiments The following case comes from two ladies well known to me, Miss R. C. Despard and Miss C. M. Campbell. After successful experiments with both in the same room, ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 30
January 2nd. II. 15 P.m Thought of small almanac with a picture of pink roses on it.... R. C. Despard. [The percipient, Miss Campbell, wrote as follows. Her envelope was addressed to Miss Despar...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 31
642 A. General Criticism Of The Evidence For Telepathy Various possible sources of error and the general canons of evidence in the case of spontaneous telepathy were discussed fully by Gurney in ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 32
Errors of memory are much more difficult for a thoroughly honest person to avoid, since very few are aware of the untrustworthiness of their own memory. This ignorance aids unconscious tendencies to b...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 33
As regards the accuracy of the records, though it has been possible to draw up a sort of table of degrees, such a table affords, of course, no final criterion. Each case must be judged on its merits b...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 34
642 B. Contemporary Documentary Evidence Some attacks were made on the ground of the scarcity of contemporary documentary evidence; for instance, one by Mr. A. Taylor Innes, in a paper entitled ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 35
642 C. Hallucinations And Illusions Of Memory Another important objection was raised on the score of possible hallucinations of memory as to the incidents alleged. Now, illusions of memory - ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 36
645 A. The following case of repeated apparitions is taken from Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 82, the account being given by the Rev. T. L. Williams, vicar of Porthleven, near Helston. ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 37
645 B. The next account (quoted from Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 85) is from Mrs. Stone, of Shute Haye, Walditch, Bridport, and was written in 1883. On three occasions, each time by ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 38
645 C. Taken from Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 91. The account comes from Captain A. S. Beaumont, of 1 Crescent Road, South Norwood Park: - February 24th, 1885. About September 1873, ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 39
645 D. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. vi. p. 129. The case is recorded by the Misses H. M. and L. Bourne. Additional evidence of the hallucinatory character of the figure seen is afforded by the ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 40
645 E. From the Report on the Census of Hallucinations, Proceedings S.P.R., vol. x. p. 275. This case is particularly interesting because the agent, Miss Maughan (now Mrs. G. Rayleigh Vicars), has ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 41
651 A. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 144. The following statement (which was first published in the Spiritualist) was drawn up sixteen days after the incident occurred, through the ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 42
654 A. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 97. The narrator is the late Rev. W. Mountford, of Boston, U.S.A., a minister and author of repute. One day, some fifteen years ago, I went from ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 43
654 B. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 194. Major W., resident near Conon Bridge, Ross-shire, writes: - February 9th, 1882. It was the month of August; rather a dark night and very still;...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 44
656 A. This case is taken from the Report on the Census of Hallucinations in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. x. p. 308. The account was written in 1890 by one of the two percipients concerned, Miss A. E. ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 45
662 A. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. i. p. 196. In the following case, the percipient, Mr. J. G. Keulemans, acquires information of what is happening at a distance through a mere mental ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 46
662 B. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 31. The following case, though undoubtedly sensory, seems still to belong to a somewhat indescribable stage of visualisation. If interpreted as ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 47
662 C. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 35. In the case just quoted, the vision hardly suggested a real external object, and further stages remain, on the path to the final one of natural ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 48
663 A. In the Appendices to section 425 I have given some cases of premonitions occurring in dreams. Other precognitive cases are given in my article on The Subliminal Self: the Relation of ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 49
We obtained the following answers to questions sent to Mr. William Todd, January 15th, 1891, re Dr. Wiltsés Vision. Q. 1. Did Dr. Wiltse describe to you picture appearances which he said he was se...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 50
665 A. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. vii. p. 25. The following case is interesting on account of the different stages through which the impression passed. It will be noticed that it began with a ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 51
My friend B. then came up, saying, Come and see A. H., what a state he is in. I found him in the bathroom with his collar and shirt torn open, the front of the latter with blood upon it, and bathing...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 52
665 C. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. v. p. 147. The following account of a very curious experience of Mr. Dickinson, a photographer, of 43 Grainger Street, Newcastle-on-Tyne, was obtained for us by ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 53
It is curious to me that I have no recollection of hearing the man come upstairs, or of him going down. In appearance he was pale and careworn, and looked as though he had been very ill. This thought ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 54
666 A. The following example of a reciprocal case (quoted from Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 162)is from the Hon. Mrs. Parker, of 60 Elm Park Gardens, S.W., who wrote to us on May 24th, 1883:...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 55
666 B. The next case (from Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 164) was one of collective percipience. The full names of the persons concerned were given to us, but not allowed to be printed. Mrs. S....
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 56
666 C. The following case is taken from Mrs. Sidgwick's paper, On the Evidence for Clairvoyance, in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vii. p. 41. The case was sent to us by Mr. W. B. H., who writes: - ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 57
667 A. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. i. p. 527. The next account was from a lady known to Mr. Gurney, whose only reason for withholding her name and address was her fear that a near relation ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 58
667 B. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 227. The next account is from Commander T. W. Aylesbury (late of the Indian Navy), of Sutton, Surrey. The case, at first sight, (says Gurney) may seem ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 59
668 A. From the Rev. Clarence Godfrey. This case first appeared in the second edition of Phantasms of the Living, vol. i. p. lxxxi., having been sent to Mr. Podmore by the experimenter, a friend of ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 60
668 B. The next case is taken from the Report on the Census of Hallucinations, Proceedings S.P.R., vol. x. p. 270. It is to be observed that the agent in this case - Mr. Kirk - seems to possess an ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 61
668 C. The following case is quoted from an article by Dr. R. Hodgson in the Forum for March 1900. He writes: - Dr. G., a cultured lady, an M.D., some of whose experiences as percipient have been ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 62
668 D. The experiment in the following case succeeded on the first trial. The agent was Miss Edith Maughan (now Mrs. G. Rayleigh Vicars), and the account is taken from the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. x. ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 63
668 E. From the Report on the Census of Hallucinations, Appendix G. A Proposed Scheme of Apparitions, by F. W. H. Myers, Proceedings S.P.R., vol. x. p. 418. The following is an account of an ...
-Appendix. Sensory Automatism. Part 64
668 G. Experiments Of H. M. Wesermann The following account of Wesermann's experiments is quoted from the Journal S.P.R., vol. iv. p. 217, being there taken from a book called Mesmerism and the ...
-Syllabus For Chapter VII. Phantasms Of The Dead
700. From the actions and perceptions of spirits still in the flesh, and concerned with one another, we must now pass on to inquiry into the actions of spirits no longer in the flesh, and into the ...
-Syllabus For Chapter VIII. Motor Automatism
800. The lines of evidence followed in previous chapters, and here briefly recapitulated, are in themselves sufficient to justify the reader in provisional acceptance of my primary thesis - namely, ...
-Syllabus For Chapter VIII. Motor Automatism. Continued
836. Her alleged reincarnations. 837. The Martian language. 838. Reversion to previous epochs of life. 839. Possible sport of spirits. 840. Mlle. Smith's teleological automatisms. ...
-Syllabus For Chapter IX. Trance, Possession, And Ecstasy
900. Possession may be defined as a development of Motor Automatism, resulting at last in a substitution of personality; there has recently been a great advance in the evidence for this theory. ...
-Syllabus For Chapter IX. Trance, Possession, And Ecstasy. Continued
928. All such cases are difficult to classify precisely, but the more developed forms of possession throw light on the more rudimentary ones. 929. The most rudimentary form seems to be a momentary ...
-Syllabus For Chapter X. Epilogue
1000. Some attempt to place these new discoveries in clearer relation to existing schemes of civilised thought and belief is needful for the practical purpose of enlisting help in our inquiry, which ...
-Chapter VII. Phantasms Of The Dead
700. The course of our argument has gradually conducted us to a point of capital importance. A profound and central question, approached in irregular fashion from time to time in previous chapters, ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 2
702. If we would measure such a base, the jungle must be cleared to begin with. Let us move for a while among first definitions; trying to make clear to ourselves what kind of thing it is that we are ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 3
704. And in fact the very qualities which are most apt to raise derision are such as the evidence set forth in the earlier chapters of this work might reasonably lead us to expect. For I hold that ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 4
705. These preliminary considerations are applicable to any kind of alleged communication from the departed - whether well or ill evidenced; whether conveyed in sensory or in motor form. Let us ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 5
706. (V.) And now I maintain that in these post-mortem cases also we find the same general classes persisting, and in somewhat the same proportion. Most conspicuous are the actual apparitions, with ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 6
707. Let us now press the actual evidential question somewhat closer. Let us consider, for it is by no means evident at first sight, what conditions a visual or auditory phantasm is bound to fulfil ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 7
708. This, as I conceive, is a sound method of proceeding from ground made secure in Phantasms of the Living - and retraversed in my own just previous chapter - to cases closely analogous, save for ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 8
709. There are some other circumstances also in which, in spite of the fact that the death is already known, a hallucination occurring shortly afterwards may have some slight evidential value. Thus ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 9
710. In the first place, there are a few cases where a percipient is informed of a death by a veridical phantasm, and then some hours afterwards a similar phantasm, differing perhaps in detail, ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 10
712. It will be seen that these phenomena are not of so simple a type as to admit of our considering them from the point of view of time-relations alone. Whatever else, indeed, a ghost may be, it ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 11
714. We have, indeed, very few cases where actual apparitions give evidence of any continuity in the knowledge possessed by a spirit of friends on earth. Such evidence is, naturally enough, more ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 12
Mon camarade, ayant entendu la brusque interruption de mon jeu, avait leve la tete et, tant que je me rappelle, disait avoir vu aussi quelqu'un passer devant la porte de mon cabinet, mais, voyant mon ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 13
(3) En Octobre, 1890, je me trouvais avec ma femme et mon fils, age de deux ans, chez mes anciens amis, les Strijewsky, a leur campagne du gouverne-ment de Woroneje. Un jour, vers les 7 h. du soir, re...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 14
716. But apart from this information, acquired perhaps on the border-land between two states, apparitions do sometimes imply a perception of more definitely terrene events, such as the moral crises (...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 15
Her eyes looked kindly and perfectly natural into mine. Her skin was so life-like that I could see the glow or moisture on its surface, and, on the whole, there was no change in her appearance, otherw...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 16
718. I place next by themselves a small group of cases which have the interest of uniting the group just recounted, where the spirit anticipates the friend's departure, with the group next to be ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 17
720. I will quote here one case, at any rate, where such an explanation would be impossible, since both the deceased person and the phantasmal figure were previously unknown to the percipient. This ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 18
721. I now come to a considerable group of cases where the departed spirit shows a definite knowledge of some fact connected with his own earth-life, his death, or subsequent events connected with ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 19
The girl Lizzie Conley swooned. She saw her dead father; she heard from him of the money left in his old shirt; she returned to bodily consciousness; she described her father's burial dress, robe, shi...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 20
722. A dream in which a message of somewhat the same kind is given is here added in 722 A, after which will also be found (in 722 B) one of the few old cases whose lineage is sufficiently respectable ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 21
723. In this connection I may refer again to Mrs. Storie's dream of the death of her brother in a railway accident, given in Chapter IV (Sleep). (427). While I think that Gurney was right - in the ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 22
725. Taking the cases as they follow each other in that work, the first (vol. i. p. 395) is the well-known incident recorded by Lord Brougham - his vision, while taking a warm bath in Sweden, of a ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 23
726. In three of these twelve cases of fulfilment of compact, then, the agent whose phantasm appeared was certainly still alive. In most of the other cases the exact time-relation is obscure; in a ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 24
I went into my room. I lay down on the lounge for a moment, then by an impulse I cannot account for, I walked to the door. The head of the stairway was somewhat dimly lighted, as you see it now, but ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 25
727. The next case is even more remarkable. It is a deflected fulfilment, occurring two days before death, and probably during sleep; the agent has made a promise to one friend, but is only ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 26
728. Again, we cannot tell how long the spirit may continue the effort, or, so to say, renew the experiment. In a case recorded in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. x. p. 378, the compact is fulfilled after a ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 27
730. But in certain cases of violent death there seems to have been an intention on the deceased person's part to show the condition in which his body is left. Such was Mrs. Storie's dream, or rather ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 28
I have purposely not mentioned in its proper place, so as not to break the narrative, that on looking at Mackenzie I was struck by the peculiar appearance of his countenance. It was of an indescribabl...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 29
732. In the case of Mrs. Green, already quoted in Chapter IV (Sleep)., 429 D, we come across an interesting problem. Two women are drowned under very peculiar circumstances. A friend has apparently a ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 30
734. The next class of cases in this series well illustrates this unexpectedness. It has only been as the result of a gradual accumulation of concordant cases that I have come to believe there is ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 31
736. And here I will quote a case so divergent from accepted types that the ordinary retailer of ghost stories might well be tempted to pass it over in silence as incomprehensibly absurd. As will ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 32
737. Having thus discussed a number of cases where the apparition shows varying degrees of knowledge or memory, I pass on to the somewhat commoner type, where the apparition lacks the power or the ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 33
741. I pass on to a group of cases which are both personal and local; although the personal element in most of them - the desire to manifest to the friend - may seem more important than the local ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 34
742. In the case which I shall next quote, the evidence, though coming from a young boy, is clear and good, and the incident itself is thoroughly characteristic. The decedent was satisfying both a ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 35
744. I will conclude this group with three cases closely similar, all well attested, and all of them capable of explanation either on local or personal grounds. In the first (see 744 A) an apparition ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 36
745. It is, indeed, mainly by dwelling on these intermediate cases, between a message-bringing apparition and a purposeless haunt, that we have most hope of understanding the typical haunt which, ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 37
747. And since we are coming now to cases into which this element of meaningless sound will enter largely, it seems right to begin their discussion with a small group of cases where there is evidence ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 38
749. But after Poltergeists have been set aside - after a severe line has been drawn excluding all those cases (in themselves singular enough) where the main phenomena observed consist of non-...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 39
750. These hypotheses - none of which, as Mrs. Sidgwick expressly states (op. cit., p. 145), seemed to herself satisfactory - did nevertheless, I think, comprise all the deductions which could ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 40
752. Here, then, is a natural place of pause in our inquiry. We have worked as far as we can on the data which we have had under our view. The sensory automatisms with which we have dealt in this and ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 41
753. And yet it is by no means needful, it would be by no means wise, to close even this earlier branch of the inquiry without some few words on its ethical, its religious aspect. If one hopes to ...
-Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 42
754. I have thus indicated one point of primary importance on which the undesignedly coincident testimony of hundreds of first-hand narratives supports a conclusion, not yet popularly accepted, but ...
-Chapter VIII. Motor Automatism
800. In the pursuit of the vast and inchoate inquiry to which this work is devoted, we are inevitably driven to push on in several directions in turn, along an irregular line of advance. And it will ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 2
801. The reader, however, who has followed me thus far must be well aware that a large class of phenomena, of high importance, is still awaiting discussion. Motor automatisms, - though less familiar ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 3
803. But in what way then, it will be asked, do you distinguish the supernormal from the merely abnormal? Why assume that in these aberrant states there is anything besides hysteria, besides epilepsy,...
-Motor Automatism. Part 4
805. As a first step in our analysis, we may point out certain main characters which unite in a true class all the automatisms which we are here considering - greatly though these may differ among ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 5
807. Having, then, considered an instance where the automatic message passes only between two closely-adjacent strata of consciousness, externalising an impulse derived from an idea which has only ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 6
809. Further illustrations might easily be here given. But for brevity's sake I pass on to the automatic messages which form our special subject, trusting that the specimens above given of motor ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 7
810. Before M. Richet1 I believe that no writer, outside the Spiritualistic group, so much as showed any practical knowledge of this phenomenon, - still less endeavoured to explain it. Faraday's well-...
-Motor Automatism. Part 8
812. And here, before we enter on the study of automatic writing, I shall somewhat break the thread of discussion in order to refer at length to two great historic cases of automatism, which may, ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 9
814. The next class of the Socratic monitions can only be briefly dealt with here. They touch on that singular phenomenon of so-called rapport which is to us at present and has long been in the eyes ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 10
815. The case, assuredly, is a marked one; but it may be thought to be too exceptional for the purpose of my argument. Socrates, it may be said, was too strangely above ordinary men to allow us to ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 11
816. The cases of Socrates and of Joan of Arc, on which I have just dwelt, might (as I have said) with almost equal fitness have been introduced at certain other points of my discussion. At first ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 12
818. A small group of cases may naturally be mentioned here. From two different points of view they stand for the most part at the entrance of our subject. I speak of motor inhibitions, prompted at ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 13
820. Similarly there are cases where some sudden muscular impulse or inhibition has probably depended on a subliminal perception or interpretation of a sound which had not reached the supraliminal ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 14
821. Here, again, is an averted railway accident, where smell may possibly have played some part. (From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xi. p. 419.) The following letter was received by Dr. Hodgson in ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 15
823. Tactile sensibility, again, must be carefully allowed for. The sense of varying resistance in the air, to which I just now alluded, may reach in some seeing persons, as well as in the blind, a ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 16
824. And now I give a case of sudden motor inhibition where no warning can well have been received from hyperaesthetic sensation. We have come, it seems, to telaesthesia or to spirit guardianship. ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 17
825. In the next group of cases which I shall cite, we reach a class of massive motor impulses which are almost entirely free from any sensory admixture. In the first of these, Mr. Garrison left a ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 18
826. The subject of automatic writing, to which our argument next leads us, is a creation of the last few decades, and is at present in so rapidly developing a condition that it is not easy to know ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 19
827. And here it must be strongly asserted that, however important it may be to work to the full that preliminary inquiry, it is still more important to collect the richest possible harvest of those ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 20
829. Now, as I have said, the great majority of the nunciative or message-bearing motor automatisms originate in the automatist's own mind, and do not involve the exercise of telepathy or ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 21
830. I quote in 830 A a more complex case (Clelia) furnished by a gentleman whom I there call Mr. A. It is a very good instance of the capricious half-nonsense which has often been referred to the ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 22
832. The cases of automatic writing thus far given have shown us an independent activity of the subliminal self holding colloquies with the supraliminal; but they have shown us nothing more. Yet we ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 23
833. The next case which I shall quote combines various motor automatisms in a very unusual way. I give it at length in the text, partly on account of its strangeness and partly in deference to the ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 24
Another phenomenon followed shortly afterwards. One day Mme. X. felt herself lifted with force from her arm-chair and compelled to stand upright. Her feet and her whole body then executed a systematic...
-Motor Automatism. Part 25
The dosimetric granules are a convenient mode of administering alkaloids, glycosides, and other toxic principles, and I have often been alarmed at the doses which Dr. Z. prescribed. I confess that I w...
-Motor Automatism. Part 26
Mlle Smith, I should at once say, is not,1 and never has been, a paid medium. At the date of M. Flournoy's book, she occupied a leading post on the staff of a large maison de commerce at Geneva, and g...
-Motor Automatism. Part 27
836. Thus much I think it was fair to say; - or I may speak more strongly and maintain that thus much it was a positive duty to insist upon. It is only right that this mass of communications, taken ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 28
837. In each case there are certain impressive features in the impersonation; but in each case also careful analysis negatives the idea that we can be dealing with a personality really revived from a ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 29
838. This fact of the primitive nature of M1Ie Smith's various hypnoidal elucubrations, and the different ages of her life to which they belong, seems to me (says Professor Flournoy, p. 415) to ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 30
839. In the facts which I have already given, we have got this problem reduced to its narrowest form; and I shall set forth, as barely possible, a theory which Professor Flournoy has not invoked. I ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 31
842. Most instructive of all will it be if we can obtain telepathy from discarnate spirits, and especially if we can get any glimpse of a relation between their mode of being and the cosmic ether. On ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 32
843. This case of Professor Flournoy's, then - this classical case, as it may already be fairly termed - may serve here as our culminant example of the free scope and dominant activity of the ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 33
845. In the next case there is an apparent element of prophecy; and I quote it in order to show how fallacious this appearance is, and how easily an ordinary mental anticipation of the future, if it ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 34
848. These few cases may suffice to lead us up to the palmary case of the late Rev. P. H. Newnham, Vicar of Maker, Devonport, who was personally known to Edmund Gurney and myself, and was a man in ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 35
852. I pass on to a case where an actual conversation goes on between the distant agent and the automatist, informing the automatist of matters which the agent - supraliminally or subliminally - ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 36
But to return. Finding that the communication had been so far correct, I proposed that we should compose ourselves while I repeated the alphabet as before, still hoping to receive the name of my dear ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 37
853. I pass on to a small group of cases which form a curious transition from these communications inter vivos to communications which I shall class as coming from the dead. These are cases where the ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 38
854. Now let us consider a similar message, which might have produced a similar belief in another informant's mind. But here it so happened that he tested the alleged fact of death; and found that ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 39
856. In the next case the explanation suggested by Professor Alexander is probably the correct one. (From the Journal S.P.R., vol. vi. pp. ll2-115.) The following account of some experiments in ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 40
857. The next case (857 A) is very remote; and I should not use it to aid in establishing communication with the dead. But as indicating a possible source of error, it seems worth quoting in an ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 41
860. I pass on to a series of messages which afford an interesting field for the discussion of the rival hypotheses of cryptomnesia and spirit-control. The automatist, who must here be called Mrs. ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 42
861. The first case which I shall give is in the words of Mr. Wedgwood, in the Journal S.P.R. for December, 1889 (vol. iv. p. 174). Whenever I have an opportunity, perhaps once or twice a year, I ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 43
Mr. Wedgwood thinks the name of the Governor of the fortress of Ciudad Rodrigo was Banier; but he says this would not be a test, as he knew it. He is going to see if he can find anything in Napier's P...
-Motor Automatism. Part 44
862. Mr. Wedgwood gave us also another case of a somewhat similar character, which I cite in 862 A. Finally, a few months before his death, I received from him a third retrocognitive case, which ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 45
866. I now cite a few cases where the point of central interest is the announcement of a death unknown to the sitters. The first is a case which we received from Dr. Liebeault, of Nancy, and which ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 46
868. I next give in 868 A and B two cases where certain telekinetic phenomena seem to have been connected with the announcement of a recent death, which in the first case was given by raps, and in ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 47
873. I now quote in full a general account of his experiences in automatic writing by a Mr. W., from whom I have already cited a minor experience, also of a motor type, in 823. Dr. Hodgson visited ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 48
A post-mortem showed she died from cancerous poisoning. On many occasions I have made inquiry as to whether certain sick ones would die or recover; and if die, when? Generally the answers proved ve...
-Motor Automatism. Part 49
The lady, Miss T., who had a cancer, was my aunt. The account of her sickness and death are correctly given you by my husband, but I saw no writing, although my husband told me at the time he had writ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 50
874. Deferring till the next chapter any further discussion of this problem, I give here in 874 A a well-evidenced case of a prediction by table-tilting of a precise date of death, at a distance of ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 51
I will appear to thee, was the reply. How? Thou wilt see. A few days later Sophie was returning home from a soiree; it was nearly 4 a.m. She was just retiring, and was at the door betwe...
-Motor Automatism. Part 52
876. I now give a case which in one respect stands alone. It narrates the success of a direct experiment, - a test-message planned before death, and communicated after death, by a man who held that ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 53
877. The experiment which was in this case successful is one (I repeat) which might be tried by everybody (see 877 A). And I may add the remark that it is to experiment with automatic writing, ...
-Motor Automatism. Part 54
879. As has been usual in this inquiry, this slight forward step from vagueness to comparative clearness of conception introduces us at once to a whole series of novel problems. Yet, as we have also ...
-Chapter IX. Trance, Possession And Ecstasy
Vicit iter durum pietas - Virgil. 900. The appearance of this book has been delayed for several years by several causes, of which it is to be feared that the chief has been that cause which the god...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 2
902. Now this seems a strange doctrine to have reached after so much disputation. For it simply brings us back to the creeds of the Stone Age. We have come round again to the primitive practices of ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 3
906. I have spoken of deeper states of sleep, spontaneous or induced, and here the reader will naturally recall much that has been said of ordinary somnambulism, much that has been said of hypnotic ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 4
907. But here let us pause, and consider what is the truest conception which we are by this time able to form of telepathy. The word has been a convenient one; the central notion - of communication ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 5
910. Now when we proceed from these apparitions of the living to apparitions of the departed, we find very much the same types persisting still. We find symbolical visions of departed persons, and of ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 6
912. And here comes the question: What attitude are we to assume to savage cases of possession? Are we to accept as genuine the possession of the Esquimaux, the Chinaman, - nay, of the Hebrew of old ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 7
914. Thus far, then, our field is clear, and with this clearance, I think, should vanish the somewhat grim associations which have gathered around the word possession. In what is now to be described ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 8
918. There are three strong currents of expectation of which we find constant traces, but with which the phenomena do not comply. The failure of compliance, indeed, leads to indifference or even to ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 9
922. And now suppose that a possessing spirit can use my organism more skilfully than I can. May he not manage to emit from that organism some energy which can visibly move ponderable objects not ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 10
924. This serious warning given, I may pursue my task of describing that most interesting of supernormal phenomena which we term Possession; - a phenomenon to which the telekinesis which has often ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 11
927. The way has now been so far cleared for our cases of Possession that at least the principal phenomena claimed have been (I hope) made intelligible, and shown to be concordant with other ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 12
929. In other cases it may be clear that no control of any dis-carnate spirit is involved, but there seems to be something like incipient possession by the subliminal self or incarnate spirit. From ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 13
931. Next I quote a case where a kind of conversation is indicated between the sleeper and some communicating spirit; - recalling the scraps of conversation sometimes overheard (as it were) between ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 14
932. The next case is precisely a miniature case of possession. (Compare Mr. Cameron Grant's experience, in 736 B). From the Journal S.P.R., vol. viii. pp. 278-280. The following account (...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 15
933. These cases, then, may serve as illustrations both of the incipient stages of a trance which may develop into ecstasy on the one hand or possession on the other, and of the different aspects of ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 16
936. I might, of course, save myself from this dilemma by repudiating Swedenborg's seership altogether. The evidential matter which he has left behind him is singularly scanty in comparison with his ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 17
939. As to the nature of Home's trances, there is not a little obscurity. Many of the phenomena described as occurring in his presence took place when he was not in trance at all. Sometimes his body ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 18
942. It was on May 9th, 1874, that Edmund Gurney and I met Stainton Moses for the first time, through the kindness of Mrs. Cowper-Temple (afterwards Lady Mount-Temple), who knew that we had become ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 19
944. With the even tenor of this straightforward and reputable life was inwoven a chain of mysteries which, as I think, in what way soever they be explained, make that life one of the most ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 20
946. I now pass on to consider briefly the nature of the evidence that the alleged spirits were what they purported to be, as described, in the first place, in Mr. Moses' books of automatic writing. ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 21
948. The evidence for identity obtained by Mr. Moses in the case of spirits recently departed seems at first sight more satisfactory. Some cases of this class are given in 948 A, and many others are ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 22
949. In two cases the announcement of a death was made to Mr. Moses, when the news was apparently not known to him by any normal means. One of these (the case of President Garfield) is given in 948 B....
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 23
950. The leading personage in the third and most remote group of spirits is the one known as Imperator. This spirit claims responsibility for the whole series of manifestations, and should ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 24
953. If we confine ourselves to the verbal messages, we find that the cases most fully represented in the records of Mr. Moses are limited to the first three classes mentioned above, and those which ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 25
956. I do not propose here to discuss the hypothesis of fraud in this case, since it has been fully discussed in the articles referred to in my Appendices and elsewhere, eg. by Dr. Hodgson, Professor ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 26
958. There were various cases of alleged direct control by spirits other than Phinuit during the first stage of Mrs. Piper's trance history. Two of these, the E. control and the aunt of Professor ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 27
959. More important, as regards this question of personal identity, is the series of sittings which formed the second stage of Mrs. Piper's trance history, in the years 1892-96, of which a detailed ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 28
961. As will be seen from the account of Elisa Mannors in 960 A, some attempt was made in her case to speak and write Italian. In the case which follows there was an attempt to write Hawaiian. (From ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 29
962. Not least important as regards the question of identity are some of the communications purporting to come from young children. I give in 962 A a synopsis of the chief points in connection with ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 30
963. There are numerous incidents in connection with Mrs. Piper's trances, which indicate not only that articles which have been worn by deceased persons may facilitate communications from such ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 31
966. We must now try to form some more definite idea - based not on preconceived theories but on our actual observation of trances - of the processes of possession; though it is hardly necessary to ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 32
969. It is safest to fall back for the present upon the few points which these communications do seem to indicate. The spirit, then, is holding converse with a living man, located in a certain place ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 33
972. Yet even this very difficulty and fragmentariness of communication ought in the end to be for us full of an instruction of its own. We are here actually witnessing the central mystery of human ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 34
974. We must now remember that this series of incidents does not stand alone. This case of Mrs. Piper is, indeed, one of the most instructive in our collection, on account of its length and ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 35
975. There is, however, one feeling which has done much to deter inquiry in these directions. To many minds there seems to be a want of dignity in this mode of acquiring knowledge of an unseen world. ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 36
977. It is hardly a paradox to say that the evidence for ecstasy is stronger than the evidence for any other religious belief. Of all the subjective experiences of religion, ecstasy is that which has ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 37
978. In the course of this book I have several times touched on the difficult questions raised by the incidents which have been classed as retrocognitive and precognitive,1 and which seem to suggest ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 38
980. And next let us look forward into the Future; - across that impalpable, almost imaginary line of the Present Moment, which for us is the greatest reality of all. Naturally enough, the first time-...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 39
982. Returning now to the question of retrocognition, let us consider to what extent our knowledge of the Past will sometimes open itself beyond the familiar bounds. We may begin by inquiring in what ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 40
983. Coming now to precognitions, we must first observe that there are many where what looks like knowledge of the future can be analysed into an enlarged knowledge of what actually exists. There ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 41
984. This seems to show that a man's subliminal self may sometimes perceive his own approaching death, and may transmit this knowledge to the empirical self, sometimes by aid of a hallucination. Now ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 42
986. Once more, and from a different standpoint. Few men have pondered long on these problems of Past and Future without wondering whether Past or Future be in very truth more than a name - whether ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 43
987. We have reached at last a position very remote from that from which we started. Yet it will not be easy to say exactly at what point we could have paused in our gradual sequence of evidence. In ...
-Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 44
988. The true discoverers, however, show no wish to be thus sharply distinguished from ourselves. Their aim is a collaboration with us as close as may be possible. Some of them were on earth our own ...
-Chapter X. Epilogue
1000. The task which I proposed to myself at the beginning of this work is now, after a fashion, accomplished. Following the successive steps of my programme, I have presented, - not indeed all the ...
-Epilogue. Part 2
1003. What the age needs is not an abandonment of effort, but an increase; the time is ripe for a study of unseen things as strenuous and sincere as that which Science has made familiar for the ...
-Epilogue. Part 3
1004. Let me draw out my meaning at somewhat greater length. As we have dwelt successively on various aspects of telepathy, we have gradually felt the conception enlarge and deepen under our study....
-Provisional Sketch Of A Religious Synthesis
1006. I see ground for hoping that we are within sight of a religious synthesis, which, although as yet provisional and rudimentary, may in the end meet more adequately than any previous synthesis ...
-Provisional Sketch Of A Religious Synthesis. Part 2
1009. And here, for the broad purpose of our present survey, we may divide the best religious emotion of the world in triple fashion; tracing three main streams of thought, - streams which on the ...
-Provisional Sketch Of A Religious Synthesis. Part 3
1011. And is not this a fresh instalment, or a precursory adumbration, of that Truth into which the Paraclete should lead? Has any world-scheme yet been suggested so profoundly corroborative of the ...
-Provisional Sketch Of A Religious Synthesis. Part 4
1014. Yet a durable religious synthesis should do more than satisfy man's immediate aspiration. It should be in itself progressive and evolutionary; it should bear a promise of ever deeper holiness, ...
-Appendix A. The Function Of A Society For Psychical Research
[The following formed originally a Presidential Address to the Society for Psychical Research, delivered in May, 1900. Hence the allusion to the personal position occupied by the author in that Societ...
-The Function Of A Society For Psychical Research. Part 2
Life is the final aim of life; the mission of the highest Teacher was that we might have it the more abundantly; and the universe strives best towards its ultimate purpose through the normal, vigorous...
-The Function Of A Society For Psychical Research. Part 3
They turn aside from the ambiguous pageant, the circumspect scrutiny; they specialise the name of Religion upon some clear, swift, extra-scientific knowledge as to the dealings of unseen Powers with m...
-The Function Of A Society For Psychical Research. Part 4
But still the central problem of man's being would remain unsolved. Life and thought could not be referred to the working either of aggregated molecules or of etherial undulations. To explain Life by ...
-The Function Of A Society For Psychical Research. Part 5
The faith to which Science is sworn is a faith in the uniformity, the coherence, the intelligibility of, at any rate, the material universe. Science herself is but the practical development of this mi...
-The Function Of A Society For Psychical Research. Part 6
The time, I think, is ripe for a generalisation wider than any which those ancient books contain. For just as a kind of spiritual fusion of Europe under Roman sway prepared the way for Christianity to...
-The Function Of A Society For Psychical Research. Part 7
The rank and file of Spiritists have simply transferred to certain new dogmas - for most of which they at least have some comprehensible evidence - the uncritical faith which they were actually commen...
-Appendix B. The Decline Of Dogmatism
For many minds this last century of triumphant Science, of warring Theology, has acted as a kind of proof and purgation of the human spirit. It is strange to look back and to observe with how much of ...
-Appendix C. Prayer And Supplication
The question now arises: What ought to be our own attitude towards the spirits with whom we enter into communication? To begin with, it goes without saying that our attitude should be at once respo...
-Prayer And Supplication. Continued
In ancient and modern times, in East and West, among Pagans, Buddhists, Brahmins, Mahomedans, Christians, Infidels, - everywhere it has seemed possible for men and women, by a certain stress of soul, ...
-Appendices To Chapter VII. Phantasms Of The Dead
713 A. It is possible that we might learn much were we to question dying persons, on their awakening from some comatose condition, as to their memory of any dream or vision during that state. If ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 2
I congratulated myself upon the decency with which I had composed the body and thought my friends would have little trouble on that score. I saw a number of persons sitting and standing about the b...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 3
I waited for company, what I judged to be twenty minutes; but no one came. Then I reasoned thus: It is probable that when a man dies he has his individual road to travel and must travel it alone. As n...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 4
Then suddenly I was tempted to cross the boundary line. I hesitated and reasoned thus: I have died once and if I go back, soon or late, I must die again. If I stay some one else will do my work, and ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 5
714 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. v. p. 450. The next case - I have given the percipients the name of Adie - is a curiously complicated one; but its evidential value rests mainly on the similarity ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 6
When the light went I was in total darkness as before. That same day I confided the circumstance to T. (Clara's sister), begging her not to tell her about it, since C. was feeling her father's deat...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 7
716 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vi. p. 25. Mrs. P. writes:- June 9th, 1885. Our mother died while we were all very young; and as I, the fourth child of seven, was the eldest living ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 8
I was by this time exceedingly agitated too, but remembering that the door was locked, and that the mysterious visitor had not gone towards it at all, remarked, He has not gone out by the door! But ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 9
716 B. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. viii. p. 236. In the narrative next to be cited, there is a record of prolonged speech, but in such cases, especially when few or no actual words are quoted, we ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 10
716 C. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. v. p. 10. The four incidents which follow were written out for me in 1888 by a lady whom I will term Mrs. V., who has had other experiences somewhat similar, ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 11
717 B. In the following case, a child, while apparently quite well, feels the impression of approaching death, and ascribes it to his dead brother's call. (From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xi. p. 429). ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 12
No person could have actually been in the position where she appeared, as the window in question is about 30 feet above the ground. The nearest buildings to the window referred to are the Infantry ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 13
718 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. iii. p. 92. The writer of the following account is Colonel--, a well-known Irish gentleman, but we are not allowed to publish his name. He writes from Arthur's on ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 14
718 B. In the next case (quoted from Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xiv. p. 288) a dying mother had an apparently telepathic vision of an absent son who happened to be dying at the same time. The account ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 15
719 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. x. p. 214. The account is written by Mrs. J. P. Smith. Amble, Northumberland, January 17th, 1891. In June 1879, 1 was a teacher in Macclesfield. A friend, ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 16
719 C. The following case of an apparition coinciding with a death, but representing a near relative of the dying person, instead of the dying person herself, is taken from the Report on the Census ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 17
722 A. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. vii. p. 188. The following case was sent to us from Brazil by Professor A. Alexander, the witnesses being persons well known to him. He informs us that the ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 18
725 A. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. i. p. 556. The account was received in 1882, from Captain G. F. Russell Colt, of Gartsherrie, Coatbridge, N.B. I was at home for my holidays, and residing ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 19
727 A. The following case (quoted from Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 216, foot-note) was received from the Rev. Arthur Bellamy, of Publow Vicarage, Bristol, in February 1886; but the ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 20
727 B. The following is another case which seems analogous to a deflected fulfilment of a compact, though we do not know that any compact to appear had been made, but only that the dying person had ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 21
728 A. From the Report on the Census of Hallucinations, Proceedings S.P.R., vol. x. p. 383. In the case we have next to quote (say the writers of the Report), unless we accept the hypothesis ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 22
731 A. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. vii. p. 173. The following case was sent to us by Mrs. Browne, of Bidston, Alleyn Road, West Dul-wich. The first narrative is extracted from an account privately ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 23
733 A. Prom the Journal S.P.R., vol. vi. p. 230. The following account was sent to Mr. Podmore, by Miss F. Atkinson, of 25 Aldershot Road, Willesden Lane, N.W., enclosed in a letter dated November 5 ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 24
733 B. The next case is remarkable for the frequent repetition of the percipient's experience. It is one of those that suggest, as we have said (see 703 and 733), a kind of local imprint left by past ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 25
735 A. In a case published in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. iii. p. 90, Mr. Wambey heard a phantasmal voice as though in colloquy with his own thought. He was planning a congratulatory letter to a friend, ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 26
736 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. viii. p. 218. The following account was written out by me on December 22nd, 1888, from notes taken during an interview with Mrs. Davies the same day; and was ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 27
736 B. I give next an account of a case briefly mentioned by Gurney in Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 690, about which we afterwards obtained further evidence. After mentioning two other cases ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 28
736 C. From the Report on the Census of Hallucinations, Proceedings S.P.R., vol. x. p. 373. In the following case the hallucination occurred shortly after the death, - perhaps within twenty-four ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 29
739 A. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. vii. p. 175. The following is a case which was noted at the time, before it was known to be veridical. It occurred to the Rev. E. K. Elliott, Rector of Worthing, ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 30
739 C. The next case, which I quote from Phantasms of the Living, vol. i. p. 444, was received towards the end of 1882 from Mr. J. G. Keulemans, who has already been mentioned in 662 A. In ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 31
741 A. From the Proceedings of the American Society for Psychical Research, vol. i. p. 446. This is a case of two apparently synchronous visions of consolation representing the same deceased person....
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 32
742 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. v. p. 437. The account is given by Mrs. Judd. August 6th, 1885. My grandmother was a tall, stately, and handsome woman, even at an advanced age. She was one ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 33
744 A. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. ii. p. 619. This case, if telepathically originated, is an interesting instance of the appearance of a phantasm to certain percipients on local, not personal,...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 34
744 B. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vi. p. 57. The following incident occurred to a gentleman personally known to me. The initials here given are not the true ones. On October 12th, 1888, Mr. J. ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 35
745 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. iii. p. no. The narrative is written by General Sir Arthur Becher, of St. Faith's Mede, Winchester. April 11th, 1884. General Sir A. Becher, who held a high ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 36
745 B. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. viii. p. 178. The following narrative was sent to us with the true names, but with a request to conceal them, and some local details, on account of the painful ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 37
745 C. In each of the two next cases the interval after death was considerable, and the percipient was an absolute stranger to the deceased. This condition must, of course, usually involve the ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 38
745 D. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. v. p. 466. In the following case it is possible that a real person may have been mistaken for an apparition, but the details, as reported, tell strongly against ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 39
751 A. The following case is in some respects one of the most remarkable and best authenticated instances of haunting on record, although, as will be seen, the evidence for the identity of the ...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 40
I also attempted to touch her, but she always eluded me. It was not that there was nothing there to touch, but that she always seemed to be beyond me, and if followed into a corner, simply disappeared...
-Appendix. Phantasms Of The Dead. Part 41
On August 12th, about 8 p.m., and still quite light, my sister E. was singing in the back drawing-room. I heard her stop abruptly, come out into the hall, and call me. She said she had seen the figure...
-Proofs Of Immateriality
1. I have several times fastened fine strings across the stairs at various heights before going to bed, but after all others have gone up to their rooms. These were fastened in the following way: I ma...
-Proofs Of Immateriality. Continued
751 B. In the Journal S.P.R., vol. vi. p. 146, November 1893, an account was given by Miss M. W. Scott, of Lessudden House, St. Boswell's, Roxburghshire, of an apparition seen several times by ...
-Appendices To Chapter VIII. Motor Automatism
811 A. The following is a typical case of automatic drawing, recorded at a time when the subject of automatism was almost unknown, not only to the educated layman but also to psychologists and ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 2
815 A. The following account is extracted from Mr. Andrew Lang's The Voices of Jeanne d'Arc in the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xi. pp. 198-212. Mr. Lang gives evidence taken from the Proces of her ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 3
817 A. From the Proceedings of the American S.P.R., vol. i. p. 397. Mr. M. writes to Professor Royce as follows:- Boston, Nov. 16th, 1886. Some years ago, perhaps eight or nine, while in a city of ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 4
817 B. From the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. ix. p. 33. In this case the conscious desire of the agent seems to have been the predetermining cause of the percipient's impression. The percipient, ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 5
817 C. From the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. ix. p. 35. Mrs. Hadselle sent at the same time as the above another narrative, of which she said:- I send you with this a bit of experience which I had ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 6
817 D. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. v. p. 136. The following account was sent to me by Lady de Vesci in May 1891. Whether the impulse to telegraph was really connected with the dying lady's ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 7
819 A. In the following case the hypothesis of a subliminal hyperaesthetic discernment of the bifid fern by ordinary eyesight is possibly applicable. The account is a translation of that given in the ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 8
821 A. In the following case, as in that of Mr. C. W. Moses, quoted in the text, some subliminal sense of smell may be conjectured. It is taken from the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xi. p. 421. 23 St. ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 9
825 A. From Phantasms of the Living, vol. i. p. 285. Cathedral Yard, Winchester, January 31st, 1884. I respectfully beg to offer you a short statement of my experience on a subject which I do ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 10
830 A. From the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. ii. pp. 226-31. In this case, anagrams were written automatically by Mr. A., who describes his experience as follows:- Clelia, Or Unconscious Cerebration ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 11
832 A. From the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. iv. pp. 216-24. This is a case typical at least in its main features, and specially suitable for record on account of the care with which the phenomena ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 12
832 B. Other cases of imaginary personalities are to be found in the accounts of possession which have come down to us from the Ages of Faith. I take as an example the autobiography of Soeur Jeanne ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 13
843 A. Some early experiments in thought-transference through table-tilting were published by Professor Richet in the Revue Philosophique for December 1884. A critical discussion of these by Gurney ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 14
843 B. A somewhat similar but less complex set of experiments by Mr. G. M. Smith was given in the Journal S.P.R., vol. v. pp. 318-20, as follows:- Custom House, Amble, Northumberland, October 14th,...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 15
849 A. I quote below part of Mr. Newnham's account of his experiments in thought-transference through automatic writing, the whole of which is given in the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. iii. pp. 8-23. ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 16
One isolated but very interesting experiment deserves to be recorded here. I had a young man reading with me as a private pupil at this time. On February 12th he returned from his vacation; and, on be...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 17
Here, then, assuredly, was a formula composed by some intelligence totally distinct from the conscious intelligence of either of the persons engaged in the experiment. I proceeded to inquire as fol...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 18. Automatic Writing Experiments With Planchette
The following series of experiments were conducted at Cambridge, the operator being Mr. Green, of Emmanuel College. The agents (present during all the experiments described) were Mr. W. and Mr. Buttem...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 19
851 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. ix. pp. 44-48. The following account, dated Thornes House, Wakefield, January 30th, 1893, is signed by Lady Mabel Howard; her husband, Mr. Henry Howard, of ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 20
8. I have never tried experiments in thought-transference, such as those recorded in the S.P.R. Proceedings. But I have no doubt that words and ideas do pass without speech from my husband's mind into...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 21
The following is another case which I quote from the Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xi. p. 395. Lady Vane writes:- Hutton-in-the-Forest, April 8th, 1894. About a month ago I lost a book, a manuscript ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 22
852 A. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. ix. pp. 15-16. The following incident seems to have been carefully watched and recorded, and was published, with names of guarantors, immediately after the ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 23
852 B. The following are extracts from a translation 1 of a paper on Telepathic Perceptions by Means of Automatic Writing, by M.Bonatti, which appeared in the Rivista di Studi Psichici, July 1895. ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 24
857 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. ix. pp. 67-8. Professor H. writes to Dr. Hodgson in 1889:- I write you the details of another matter told me by a friend, Hon. Z., of C--. He is one of the ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 25
858 A. My next case comes from Dr. Ermacora, of Padua. I quote it from Proceedings S.P.R., vol. ix. pp. 68-70. Padua, June 17th, 1892. . . . Signora Maria Manzini, residing here in Padua, has ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 26. Automatic Writing
859 A. The following account of Miss A.'s experiences is quoted from Proceedings S.P.R., vol. ix. (1893) pp. 73-92. Statement Of Miss A. As To Her Automatic Writing 1. Origin Of The Writing ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 27
4.Drawings Sometimes my hand is moved to draw instead of to write. The impulse in such cases is quite equally distinct. I never know what I am going to draw till the picture is half finished. My ha...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 28. Clairvoyance
I sometimes get messages which perhaps may be called clairvoyant, telling me, for instance, where lost objects are, or warning me of some danger at hand. Thus about September 20th, 1888 [this incident...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 29
III. The following writing was given at Longford, February 27th, 1890, avowedly by Estelle:- You ask me whom I see in this habitation. I see so many shades and several spirits. I see also a good...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 30
IX. The next case which I shall give is a curious one, as involving (1) raps, (2) a crystal-vision, (3) an apparition seen by two persons, viz. Miss A. herself and Mr. Harry de Windt (brother of the R...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 31
862 A. The following is another case of planchette-writing communicated by Mr. Hensleigh Wedgwood, the operators being himself and Mrs. R. The account is quoted from the Journal S.P.R., vol. iv. p. ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 32
864 A. Experiments by Professor Rossi-Pagnoni. I give extracts from the report on these experiments by Mr. H. Babington Smith, C.S.I., - a member of the Council of the S.P.R. - published in ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 33
865 A. The next case is taken from Proceedings S.P.R., vol. ix. p. 107, being there quoted from an article in the Arena for August 1891, entitled Psychic Experiences, by Sara A. Underwood;2 with ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 34
When I first began to get communications I destroyed, in a day or two after they were written, the slips of paper containing the writing, but as the developments became more interesting, Mr. Underwood...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 35
In the Arena for June 1892 Mr. Underwood continues:- My presence has been and is now one of the conditions of Mrs. Underwood's getting connected and coherent writing. Only a few words and a sentenc...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 36
867 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vi. pp. 343-48. In Proceedings, vol. v. p. 434, is given a case translated from Psychische Studien, February 1889, pp. 67-9, which describes a communication ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 37
[On this point M. Aksakoff adds, February 15th, 1890: M. Kaigorodoff informs me of the following peculiarity of his wife's (he married Mdlle. Stramm as his second wife in 1889):- During her ordinary ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 38
How does it happen, then, that the identical expression, stoppage of blood, is found both in your message and in the father's letter? It is I who inspired him with that expression. As you pe...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 39
868 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vi. pp. 355-5 7. For the following case also I am indebted to M. Aksakoff. The Pereliguine Case Document I. Copy Of Report Of Seance Held November 18th, ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 40
868 B. From the Journal S.P.R., vol. ix. pp. 280-84. The following case was sent to us by Dr. H. D. R. Kingston, of Macra, Eltham, Kent, an Associate of the S.P.R. Of the narrator, Mr. F. Hodgson, ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 41
Now comes the strangest part of the affair. Up to this time none of us could make out why any one of the name of Lewis should disturb our rest, as none of us were or had been intimately acquainted wit...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 42
869 B. The following case was printed in the Journal S.P.R., for May 1899 (vol. ix. PP. 65-8), having been sent to us by Mr. Michael Petrovo-Solovovo, of St. Petersburg, now Hon. Secretary for Russia ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 43
870 A. The following account (taken from the Journal S.P.R., vol. ix. p. 284) is translated and abridged from the Vessillo Spiritista for June 1900, where it appeared under the title of A Good Proof ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 44
871 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. ix. pp. 124-27, quoted from The Holy Truth, by Hugh Junor Browne, pp. 63-71. In this [automatic writing] we were unsuccessful, until it came to the turn of my ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 45
I may state my daughter does not know a word of Kaffir, having been born several years after I was last in that country. I inquired who influenced her hand to write, as the art of writing is generally...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 46
True, she was aunt to the little one whose little hand she was holding. The pressure upon the paper of the first two sheets was uneven, and it requires close attention to follow some portions of the f...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 47
873 A. The following experience of Mr. W.'s is quoted from Pro-ceedings S. P.R., vol. xi. p. 463:- October 26th, 1894. . . . The following is an account of an experience I had last April. In ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 48
874 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xi. pp. 432-37. The following appeared in the Religio-Philosophical Journal for November 1st, 1890:- Statement of Dr. Suddick. For some time past we have ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 49
At several other seances, held at the home of Mr. Brickey and other places, these questions were again asked, and the answers repeated that Mr. Varis would die on the morning of October 8th, as at the...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 50
876 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vi. pp. 353-55. In an article in Psychische Studien, March 1889 (p. 131), the editor (Mr. Alexander Aksakoff), writes:- I am personally acquainted with the ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 51
876 B. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. viii. pp. 238-42. The following case of a communication indicating the whereabouts of a missing note of hand was sent to Dr. Hodgson by Judge W. D. Harden, of ...
-Appendix. Motor Automatism. Part 52
As you see from her statement, the exact date of the memorable seance cannot be given by her. But some coincidental occurrences [mentioned in detail, show that it was most likely] the 13th or the 20th...
-Appendices To Chapter IX. Trance, Possession And Ecstasy
912 A. The following account of Dr. John L. Nevius's book on Demon Possession and Allied Themes (2nd Edition. Fleming H. Revell Co., Chicago, New York, Toronto, 1896) is taken from a review by ...
-Appendix. Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 2
923 A. For accounts of the impostures of Madame Blavatsky and other members of the Theosophical Society, see:- (1) Report of the Committee appointed to Investigate Phenomena connected with the ...
-Appendix. Trance, Possession And Ecstasy. Part 3
925 A. An instance of a supposed telekinetic phenomenon which was probably to be attributed to motor automatism is that mentioned in the case of Mme. X. (see 833) when, as she was standing on a chair,...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty
I. First Series:- Phenomena Supraliminally Controlled, Or Occurring In Ordinary Life 1. Supraliminal or empirical consciousness; aware only of the material world through sensory impressions. 2. ...
-1st Series: Phenomena Supraliminally Controlled, Or Occurring In Ordinary Life
(1) Supraliminal Or Empirical Consciousness; Aware Only Of The Material World Through Sensory Impressions Beginning with the series of manifestations of supraliminal or normal faculty - normal me...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. 2nd Series: Phenomena Subliminally Controlled
(1) Subliminal Consciousness; Obscurely Aware Of The Transcendental World, Through Telepathic And Telcesthetic Impressions Let us turn now to our second scheme; that which is to represent for us vi...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Physical Expenditure Modified By Subliminal Control
(3) Physical Expenditure Modified By Subliminal Control. (A) Mechanical Work Modified By Psychical Integration Or Disintegration; Hysteria And next as to the effect of subliminal control upon the o...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Action On The Incarnation Of Life On The Planet
(4) Action On The Incarnation Of Life On The Planet (A) Prenatal Suggestion Through Intermediate Organism Of Parent We come next to the problem of the influence of subliminal control on the real...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Mental Expenditure; Response To Stimuli Modified By Subliminal Control
(6) Mental Expenditure; Response To Stimuli Modified By Subliminal Control (A) Subliminal Ideation; The Inspirations Of Genius From this brief review of the influence of the subliminal self on m...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Extradition Of Will-Power Beyond The Organism; Telergy; Self-Projection
(C) Extradition Of Will-Power Beyond The Organism; Telergy; Self-Projection And if the despot chooses to ignore his own country's Constitution, what guarantee have we that he will respect treaty-ob...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Modifications Of Subliminal Personality
(7) Modifications Of Subliminal Personality (A) Birth; As Spiritual Individuation With the profounder con-ception of the Self which our inclusion of its subliminal elements implies, we find asso...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Death; As Irrevocable Self-Projection Of The Spirit
(D) Death; As Irrevocable Self-Projection Of The Spirit Then when the last change comes, and we ask ourselves with what added ground for speculation we now strain our gaze beyond that obscurest cri...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. 3rd Series: Phenomena Claimed As Spiritually Controlled
III. Third Series:- Phenomena Claimed As Spiritually Controlled (1) Subliminal Consciousness, Discerning And Influenced By Disembodied Spirits In A Spiritual World; Who Co-Operate In Producing Obje...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Physical Expenditure Modified By Spirit-Control
(3) Physical Expenditure Modified By Spirit-Control (A) Mechanical Efficiency Increased And Fulcrum Displaced Having thus dealt briefly with spirit-influence as exercised upon the processes of n...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Control Over Individual Material Molecules
(B) Control Over Individual Material Molecules,- Resulting In Abrogation Of Ordinary Thermal Laws, And In Aggregation And Disaggregation Of Matter These novel dealings with matter, while very vario...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 13
This latter rule of assortment, carried into execution by the demon, disequalises temperature and undoes the natural diffusion of heat - the former undoes the natural diffusion of matter. By a combina...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 14
Home then made some very curious experiments with flowers; he separated the scent into two portions, one odour smelling exactly like earth, the other being very sweet. And so a fresh lemon with its ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Control Over Etherial Manifestations
(C) Control Over Etherial Manifestations: With Possible Effects In The Domains Of Light, Electricity, Gravitation, And Cohesion Our next topic, could we deal with it with fuller knowledge, must nee...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Light Accompanying Vital Action
(L. 3.) Light Accompanying Vital Action Vital Secretory Phosphorescence Under secretory phosphorescence I include all cases where animal luminosity appears due to the secretion by the animal of ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 17
Excretory Phosphorescence Under Spirit Control I have already noted, under subliminal phenomena (II. 3. c), the luminous appearance of Mr. Moses' hands, which he records as persisting after a seanc...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Action On The Incarnation Of Life On The Planet. Pre-Conceptual Suggestion Or Self-Suggestion
(4) Action On The Incarnation Of Life On The Planet (A) Pre-Conceptual Suggestion Or Self-Suggestion And if this has been already perceived in tracing spirit-influence on the material and etheri...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Ectoplasy Or Materialisation
(B) Ectoplasy Or Materialisation; Temporary Extradition Or Concentration Of Vital Energy But, leaving such speculations to derive elsewhere from cases of precognition what support they may, we must...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 20
() In the classes of ectoplasms already enumerated, there has been at least an apparent continuous connection with the body of the sensitive; - although, in the last-mentioned case especially, t...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 21. Mental Nutrition Modified By Spirit Control
(5) Mental Nutrition Modified By Spirit Control (A) Ordinary Sensory Perception Spiritually Controlled -The next heading in our previous series was sensory receptivity. In the scheme of supralim...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 22
But the form of clairvoyance characteristic of spirit-guidance is that which enables the sensitive to perceive the spiritual environment interpenetrating the environment which we know. To perceive ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Response To Stimuli Spiritually Controlled
(6) Response To Stimuli Spiritually Controlled (A) Ideation Inspired By Spirits We enter in this section 6 upon a group of phenomena of great interest and importance, but not of a type on which ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 24
927 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. ix. p. 119. In the following case the phenomena described were various, but consisted mainly of automatic writing and speech. Some of the writings evinced a ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 25
On another occasion another doctor, calling himself Arnold, confirmed the diagnosis of Dr. Snobinski, and rated my brother for having neglected to follow the regimen recommended by the famous Russian....
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 26
927 B. The experiences described in connection with Miss White and Miss Lottie Fowler (both of whom are now dead) seem analogous to experiences with Mrs. Piper. The case of Miss White comes from ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 27
927 C. Concerning Miss Lottie Fowler, I quote accounts of two incidents, one recorded by Mr. W. Stainton Moses and the other by Mr. C. C. Massey. Mr. Moses' account is given in Proceedings S.P.R., ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 28
934 A. An account of the experiences of the Rev. C. B. Sanders was published in a book entitled X+ Y=Z; or, The Sleeping Preacher of North Alabama. Containing an account of most wonderful mysterious ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 29
Mr. Mitchell writes:- This peculiar state, which is involuntary in its recurrence, is not usually heralded by any premonitions visible to those who may be present. He may be taking part in social c...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 30
State of Ala., Madison Co., Meridianville, May 10th, 1876. In 1867, I lived two and a half miles east of this village, on what is known as the Harris place, on the other side of Brier Fork Creek...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 31
936 A. For Kant's evidence in regard to the supernormal powers of Swedenborg, see Dreams of a Spirit Seer, by Immanuel Kant, translated by E. F. Goerwitz; edited by Frank Sewall (London: Swan Sonnen-...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 32
936 C. The following is another case of ecstasy, which was reported to us along with a series of incidents suggesting an unseen protection or guidance. The narrator, Mr. J. W. Skilton, was a railway ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 33
937 A. [The first volume of Alphonse Cahagnet's Arcanes de la vie future devoiles was published at Paris in 1848, and the second, reporting his sittings with Adele Maginot, in 1849. This medium had ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 34
No. 122 Pastor Rostan, who is referred to in the preceding seance in connection with the conversion of M. l'Abbe A--, desired in his turn to obtain an apparition. He asked for a person unknown to h...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 35
No. 99 Adele, as soon as she was asleep, said: - I see him. Where do you see him? Here. Give us a description of him again and also of the place where he is. He is a fair man, tanned by th...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 36
938 A. The chief sources of information as to D. D. Home's life and experiences are the following works: - Incidents in my Life, by D. D. Home (1st edition, London, 1863; 2nd edition, 1864; second ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 37
We must observe, however, that the Lyon case, however discreditable to Home personally, has no clear bearing on the reality of his powers, since there seems to have been no assertion that any of the p...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 38
943 A. A general account of The Experiences of W. Stainton Moses was given by me in Proceedings S.P.R. vol. ix. pp. 245-352, and vol. xi. pp. 24-113. The following extract is from vol. ix. pp. 245-...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 39
A brief record of Mr. Moses' life, with some estimates of the work done by him in ordinary professional capacities, will help the reader to form something of a personal judgment on his character. O...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 40
After some four years of residence near Ramsey, he accepted the curacy of St. George's, Douglas, Isle of Man. Here also he was esteemed as an active clergyman, and admired as a preacher. In April 1869...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 41
946 A. From the preface to Spirit Teachings, by W. Stainton Moses. The communications which form the bulk of this volume were received by the process known as automatic or passive writing. This is ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 42
By degrees, I found that many spirits who were unable to influence my hand themselves sought the aid of a spirit Rector, who was apparently able to write more freely and with less strain on me; for ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 43
947 A. From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xi. pp. 106-7. I will now give the account of Rector-one of the alleged remoter spirits - as to a quotation from a closed and unknown book. This spirit was, ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 44
It is plain that a power such as this of acquiring and reproducing fresh knowledge interposes much difficulty in the way of identifying any alleged spirit by means of his knowledge of the facts of his...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 45
(6) Another account to which I should like to refer is that of Rosamira Lancaster:- On February 28th, 1874, and following evening a spirit came by raps, and gave the name of 'Rosamira.' She said t...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 46
948 B. I add two other cases not included by Mr. Moses in his paper on The Identity of Spirit. (From Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xi. p. 100). (1) Fanny Westoby This case was described by Mr. ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 47
956 A. Reports and discussions on the case of Mrs. Piper have been published in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vi. pp. 436-659; vol. viii. pp. 1-167; vol. xiii. pp. 284-582; vol. xiv. pp. 6-78; vol. xv. pp....
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 48
... As for the explanation of her trance-phenomena, I have none to offer. The prima facie theory, which is that of spirit-control, is hard to reconcile with the extreme triviality of most of the commu...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 49
956 B. The next passage I quote from the Introduction by myself - Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vi. pp. 436-442, - to the records of sittings given by Mrs. Piper in England, 1889-90:- Mrs. Piper's case ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 50
957 A. From the report by Professor Lodge, Proceedings S.P.R., vol. vi. pp. 448-53. The personality active and speaking in the trance is apparently so distinct from the personality of Mrs. Piper ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 51
I have laid much stress upon this fishery hypothesis because it is a fact to be taken into consideration, because it is occasionally an unfortunately conspicuous fact, and because of its deterrent eff...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 52
959 A. [The following account is quoted from the beginning of the History of the G. P. Communications, given by Dr. Hodgson in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xiii. pp. 295-335]. G. P. met his death ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 53
Phinuit [fingering locket hard]: It has hair in it. It is the hair of his father . . . George . . . and of another, his mother, too. (Yes, that's right.) The influences are confusing. (I have somethin...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 54
I was myself unaware of them, and was not at that time acquainted with the Howards, and in fact nearly every statement made at the sitting, during which I was the note-taker, concerned matters of whic...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 55
959 B. [Dr. Hodgson's Report continues as follows:- ] It so happened that appointments had been made for other sitters, and it was nearly three weeks before a special opportunity was given for ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 56
959 C. [The following is from Dr. Hodgson's report in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xiii. pp. 353-57]. I close this section of my Report by a brief account of the case of the friend whom I have called ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 57
I said no, your wife's brother. Another incident at the same sitting showed a curious remembrance. . . . Ask for my cigar case ... am I dreaming ... I think I know that once I sat in this corn...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 58
960 A. From Dr. Hodgson's Report in Proceedings S.P.R., vol. xiii. PP- 335-6. I pass on now to consider briefly the results obtained from some other communicators, and begin with the case of the ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 59
963 A. I now cite a few instances of prophecies given through Mrs. Piper. (a) The following account is from Miss W.'s report (made from con-temporary notes) of sittings with Mrs. Piper, ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 60
980 A. I cited in 858 A a case, communicated by Dr. Ermacora, of Padua, of foreknowledge of a letter's arrival on the part of a sensitive well known to him, Signorina Maria Manzini, the knowledge ...
-Synopsis Of Vital Faculty. Part 61
In his box were the organ and an alarum, as samples, and he had with him, but not in the box, samples of the earrings, of the frames, and two oleographs between pasteboards. Luigia Monti and Linda ...







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