Cartago, an inland city of the United States of Colombia, in the state of Cauca, on the right bank of the river Cauca, 130 m. W. of Bogota, for the trade of which city it is the entrepot; pop. about 8,000. It is situated at a slight elevation above the Cauca, and 3,500 ft. above the level of the sea. The streets are wide and well laid out, but poorly lighted; the houses are well built; and the surrounding country is exceedingly picturesque and highly cultivated. Cartago has a cathedral, two parish churches, and a Lancasterian and some other schools. Considerable droves of horned cattle and swine are raised in the neighborhood; the various tropical fruits, sugar, cacao of superior quality, coffee, and tobacco, are abundantly produced, and form, with swine and jerked beef, the chief articles of export. The city was founded by the Spaniards in 1540, between the rivers Otan and Quindiu, and was at the end of the same century transferred to its present site.

Cartagena, Colombia.

Cartagena, Colombia.

Cartago #1

Cartago, an inland town of Costa Rica, on the right bank of the river of the same name, 13 m. E. 1ST. E. of San Jose. This town, once a populous and prosperous emporium, and the residence of the federal authorities, was almost swallowed up, Sept. 2, 1841, by an earthquake which left standing only 100 out of 3,000 houses, and one out of seven churches. The commercial importance of the place has ever since been on the decrease, and the population has dwindled to about 5,000, owing in part to the decrease of the Indians, who mainly form the working class. Near the town is an extinct volcano 11,480 ft. high.