Cashel (anc. Carsiol, the "habitation in the rock"), a town of Ireland, in the county and 12 m. N. E. of Tipperary, and 90 m. S. W. of Dublin; pop. in 1871, 3,976. Part of it is well built, but it has a poverty-stricken appearance, is destitute of manufactures, and has been on the decline for many years. It contains an Anglican parish church, a nunnery, chapels, schools, barracks, a hospital, an infirmary, and court houses. Its most interesting object is the famous "rock of Cashel," which rises abruptly from the plain outside of the city, and is crowned with the finest collection of ruins in Ireland. These consist of a round tower, a splendid Gothic cathedral built about the 12th century, a monastery and a castle of about the same date, and a chapel of hewn stone, with a roof of the same material, built in the Saxon and Norman styles of architecture, and still showing marks of extraordinary beauty. These remains, which are visible at a great distance, are all within an enclosed area. At the foot of the rock are the ruins of Hore abbey and of a Dominican priory.

Donald O'Brien, king of Limerick, and his nobles took the oath of allegiance to Henry II. here in 1172. Cashel was the ancient residence of the sovereigns of Mun-ster, and is often dignified by the title of "the city of kings." In the civil wars following the rebellion of 1641, it was taken by Lord Inchi-quin, and afterward by Cromwell. It is the seat of a Catholic archbishopric. The former Anglican archbishopric of Cashel has recently been united with the bishopric of Waterford.

Cashel Cathedral.

Cashel Cathedral.