Chittor Chitore, Chetorc, or Chittorgurh, a town of British India, formerly the capital of the rajahship of Odeypoor, situated on the river Biruch or Beris, over which is a bridge of nine arches, 36 m. N. W. of Neemutch, and 100 m. S. of Nusseera-bad; lat. 24° 52' N, lon. 74° 41' E. It contains three large temples, and a remarkable structure called the pillar of victory, erected in 1439 to commemorate the defeat of the combined armies of Malwa and Guzerat by Rana Khumbo, who governed Odevpoor from 1418 to 14G8. It is 122 ft. high, covered with mythological sculptures in white marble, and has nine stories, the whole surmounted by a cupola. There are several large reservoirs, but the most important feature of the town is its fortress, built on a high scarped rock, and considered a work of great strength. Its walls, though enclosing only an irregular and not very extensive area, are said to describe a circuit of 12 m. Most of the notable buildings arc within this enclosure. After undergoing several changes of rulers, Chitore was stormed by the emperor Akbar in 1568, when the Rajpoot garrison, 8,000 strong, after exhausting every means of resistance and all hope of relief, sacrificed their wives and children, and rushing upon the enemy perished almost to a man.

It was afterward recovered by the Rajpoots, was captured by Aurungzebe about 1676, and reverted to the Rajpoots on the dismemberment of the empire of Delhi, toward the close of the 18th century.

Pillar of Victory.

Pillar of Victory.