Jabiru, a large wading bird of the stork family, found in South America and Africa, of the genus mycteria (Linn.). The bill is about a foot and a half long, and strong, resembling that of the stork except that it is bent a little upward at the point. It is a large bird, measuring between 5 and 6 ft. in length; the wings are long and ample, with the second and third quills longest; tail moderate and broad; tarsi much longer than the middle toe, and covered with reticulated scales; the toes are long, united at their bases, with most of the hind toe resting on the ground. Only two species are described by Gray, of which the best known is the American jabiru (M. Americana, Linn.); in this the bill is black, the head and about two thirds of the neck bare and blackish, and the lower part of the neck bright red; there are a few white feathers on the hind head, and the rest of the plumage is white. It inhabits Brazil and Guiana, frequenting swamps, seeking for fish and reptiles; it rises slowly to a great height, supporting itself for a very long time. The nest is made on lofty trees, and the eggs are generally two; the young are fed with fish; the flesh of the young is tender and tolerably good eating.

The African species (M. Senegalensis, Shaw) is an equally large bird, generally white, with head, neck, and scapulars black; it has two pendent wattles at the base of the bill.

Jabiru (Mycteria Senegalensis).

Jabiru (Mycteria Senegalensis).