Kenilworth, a parish and village of Warwickshire, England, about equidistant (5 m.) from Leamington, Warwick, and Coventry, containing the splendid ruins of Kenilworth castle. Of the original structure only a massive tower called Caesar's tower is now standing; but there are considerable remains of subsequent additions. Among these is part of the great hall erected by John of Gaunt, 86 ft. in length by 45 in width, with windows on both sides, and fireplaces at either, end. The walls of Caesar's tower are in some places 16 ft. thick. Kenilworth was founded by Geoffrey de Clinton, treasurer to Henry I., and, having passed to the crown, was bestowed by Henry III. on Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester. When De Montfort was defeated and killed, his adherents held it for six months against the king, and at length made favorable terms of capitulation. Edward II. was prisoner in it for some time. Edward III. bestowed it on John of Gaunt, who built large additions to it. When his son Henry Bolingbroke became king, it was again vested in the crown, until Queen Elizabeth bestowed it on her favorite, Dudley, earl of Leicester. Elizabeth visited it three times, the last in 1575, being the occasion so graphically narrated by Sir Walter Scott in his novel of "Kenihvorth." The castle was dismantled in the time of Cromwell. After the restoration it belonged to the family of Clarendon, and is now the property of the family of Eardley-Wilmot.

Caesar's Tower, Kenilworth.

Caesar's Tower, Kenilworth.