I. The N. W. County Of Alabama

I. The N. W. County Of Alabama, bordering on Tennessee and Mississippi, and bounded S. and W. by the Tennessee river; area, 672 sq. m.; pop. in 1870,15,091, of whom 5,170 were colored. The surface is hilly, and the soil fertile. Iron ore and limestone abound.

The Florence branch of the Memphis and Charleston railroad terminates at the county seat. The chief productions in 1870 were 24,126 bushels of wheat, 447,155 of Indian corn, 12,526 of oats, and 5,457 bales of cotton. There were 2,380 horses, 1,115 mules and asses, 2,964 milch cows, 4,288 other cattle, 5,984 sheep, and 16,196 swine. Capital, Florence.

II. An E. County Of Mississippi

II. An E. County Of Mississippi, bordering on Alabama, and drained by branches of the Chickasawha river; area, 700 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 13,464, of whom 6,411 were colored. The Mobile and Ohio, the Alabama and Chattanooga, the Alabama Central, and the Vicksburg and Meridian railroads traverse it. The chief productions in 1870 were .140,250 bushels of Indian corn, 23,902 of sweet potatoes, and 3,683 bales of cotton. There were 895 horses, 561 mules and asses, 2,040 milch cows, 4,218 other cattle, 2,314 sheep, and 7,276 swine. Capital, Marion.

III. A W. County Of Tennessee

III. A W. County Of Tennessee, separated from Arkansas by the Mississippi, bounded N. in part by Forked Deer river, and S. by the Big Hatchic; area, about 350 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 10,838, of whom 3,484 were colored. The surface is level or undulating, and the soil fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 18,669 bushels of wheat, 443,809 of Indian corn, and 6,337 bales of cotton. There were 1,992 horses, 1,123 mules and asses, 2,799 milch cows, 4,727 other cattle, 3,118 sheep, and 22,086 swine. Capital, Ripley.