Manakin, the name applied to the denti-rostral birds of the family ampelidae or chatterers and subfamily piprinm; they are generally small and of brilliant colors, and with one exception inhabitants of the warmer parts of South America. They have a moderate or short bill, depressed, with broad base, curved rid^e, compressed sides, and toothed tip; the nostrils are hidden by the frontal feathers- the wings generally short and pointed; tad short and even; tarsimoderate and slender; toes long, the outer united to the middle to beyond the second joint; claws acute. The red manakin or chatterer (pliocnicercus carnifex, Swains.) is about Tin. long; the crest, lower back, rump, lower belly, thighs, and vent, bright crimson; rest of plumage dull rod dusky on the back; tail crimson, with end and outer web dusky brown; the female is of a general greenish olive color, with tinges of red on the head, abdomen, and tail; the young birds are brownish with whitish markings. This and the P. nigricollia (Swains.) inhabit the eastern parts of tropical South America. - The blue-backed manakin (pipra parcola, Linn.) is 4 1/2 in. long; the plumage is black, with the back and lesser wing coverts blue, and a crest of bright crimson feathers; the female and young are greenish. There are more than 30 other species.

These beautiful and active birds inhabit damp woods, on the borders of which they live in small flocks, seeking for insects and fruits. - The rock manakins belong to the genus rupi-cola ( Briss. ), of which the best known species is the orange manakin or cock of the rock (R crocea, Bonn); the plumage is saffron orange, with the quills partly white and partly brown andithe wing coverts loose and frinjred- it has a lingular crest of feathers arranged in two planes, arising from the sides of the head and meeting over and in front of the bill; the size is that of a small pigeon. This handsome species inhabits rocky places near the borders of the streams in Guiana, and its legs and feet are nearly as stout as in a gallinaceous bird of the same size, whence its common name; it is active and suspicious, feeding on fruits and berries; the nest is placed in holes in the rocks, composed of roots, grass, and earth, lined with finer materials; it lays two white eggs, about the size of those of a pigeon; it is now comparatively rare, as it is hunted for the beauty of its plumage.

There is a species in Peru (R Peruviana, Lath.), of a reddish saffron color, with black quills and tail, and ashy wing coverts; it is a little larger than the other. - The only old-world representative of this subfamily belongs to the genus calyptomena (Raffles), found in the thick forests of Java and Sumatra; the plumage is shining green, with a spot on each side of the nape, three oblique stripes on the wings, and the quills, except the outer margins, dark-colored. The only species described by Gray is the green manakin (G. viridis, Rafrl.), about 6 in. long; the color so nearly resembles the foliage of the high trees upon which it generally perches, that it is very difficult to see and to procure; its food is entirely vegetable.

Red Manakin (Phceaicercus carnifex).

Red Manakin (Phceaicercus carnifex).

Onugo Manakin (Rupicola crocea).

Onugo Manakin (Rupicola crocea).