I

Ferric chloride.....     4 parts

Zinc chloride.......     5 parts

Aluminum chloride.     5 parts

Calcium chloride ...     4 parts

Manganese chloride    3 parts

Water............. 69 parts

If desired, 10 grains thymol and 2 fluidrachms oil of rosemary, previously dissolved in about 12 fluidrachms of alcohol, may be added to each gallon.

II

Alum............. 10 parts

Sodium carbonate . . 10 parts Ammonium chloride 2 parts Sodium chloride.... 2 parts

Zinc chloride....... 1 part

Hydrochloric acid, sufficient. Water.............100 parts

Dissolve the alum in about 50 parts boiling water and add the sodium carbonate. The resulting precipitate of aluminum hydrate dissolve with the aid of just sufficient hydrochloric acid, and add the other ingredients previously dissolved in the remainder of the water.

III

Mercuric chloride... 1 part Cupric sulphate .... 10 parts

Zinc sulphate....... 50 parts

Sodium chloride. ... 65 parts Water to make 1,000 parts.

Paris Salts

The disinfectant known by this name is a mixture made from the following recipe:

Zinc sulphate...... 49 parts

Ammonia alum..... 49 parts

Potash permanganate............ 1 part

Lime............. 1 part

The ingredients are fused together, mixed with a little calcium chloride, and perfumed with thymol.

Piatt's Chlorides

I

Aluminum sulphate. 6 ounces

Zinc chloride....... 1.5 ounces

Sodium chloride... . 2 ounces Calcium chloride. . . 3 ounces Water enough to make 2 pints.

II

A more elaborate formula for a preparation said to resemble the proprietary article is as follows:

Zinc, in strips......     4 ounces

Lead carbonate....     2 ounces

Chlorinated lime...     1 ounce

Magnesium carbonate .............       0.5 ounce

Aluminum hydrate.     1.5 ounces

Potassium hydrate. .       0.5 ounce

Hydrochloric acid ..   16 ounces

Water.............   16 ounces

Whiting, enough.

Dissolve the zinc in the acid; then add the other salts singly in the order named, letting each dissolve before the next is added. When all are dissolved add the water to the solution, and after a couple of hours add a little whiting to neutralize any excess of acid; then filter.

Zinc chloride ranks very low among disinfectants, and the use of such solutions as these, by giving a false sense of security from disease germs, may be the means of spreading rather than of checking the spread of sickness.

Disinfecting Coating

Carbolic acid, 2 parts; manganese, 3 parts; calcium chloride, 2 parts; china clay, 10 parts; infusorial earth, 4 parts ; dextrin, 2 parts; and water, 10 parts.