(See also Foods.)

Preservative Fluid for Museums

Formaldehyde solution............. 6 parts

Glycerine.......... 12 parts

Alcohol............ 3 parts

Water............. 100 parts

The addition of glycerine becomes necessary only if it is desired to keep the pieces in a soft state. Filtering through animal charcoal renders the liquid perfectly colorless. For dense objects, such as lungs and liver, it is best to make incisions so as to facilitate the penetration of the fluid. In the case of very thick pieces, it is best to take 80 to 100 parts of formaldehyde solution for above quantities.

Preservative for Stone, etc

A new composition, or paint, for protecting stone, wood, cement, etc., from the effects of damp or other deleterious influences consists of quicklime, chalk, mineral colors, turpentine, boiled oil, galipot, rosin, and benzine. The lime, chalk, colors, and turpentine are first fixed and then made into a paste with the boiled oil. The paste is finely ground and mixed with the rosins previously dissolved in the benzine.

Preservative for Stuffed Animals

For the exterior preservation use

Arsenic.............0.7 parts

Alum............. 15.0 parts

Water..............100.0 parts

For sprinkling the inside skin as well as filling bones, the following is employed:

Camphor........... 2 parts

Insect powder....... 2 parts

Black pepper........ 1 part

Flowers of sulphur. . . 4 parts

Alum.............. 3 parts

Calcined soda....... 3 parts

Tobacco powder..... 3 parts

Preservatives for Zoological and Anatomical Specimens

The preparations are first placed in a solution or mixture of

Sodium fluoride...... 5 parts

Formaldehyde (40 per cent)............. 2 parts

Water............. .100 parts

After leaving this fixing liquid they are put in the following preservative solution:                                     

Glycerine (28° Bé.)... 5 parts

Water.............. 10 parts

Magnesium chloride.. 1 part

Sodium fluoride...... 0.2 parts

In this liquid zoological preparations, especially reptiles, retain their natural coloring. Most anatomical preparations likewise remain unchanged therein.

PRESERVATIVES FOR WOOD

See Wood.