books



previous page: Spool Knitting | by Mary A. McCormack
  
page up: Needlework Books
  
next page: School Needlework. A Course of Study in Sewing Designed For Use In Schools | by Olive C. Hapgood

Text-Book On Domestic Art: With Illustrations And Drafts | by Carrie Crane Ingalls



The art of sewing, intuitive in every girl, should be developed; if a mother can not teach her little daughter elementary sewing, why should not the State provide teachers for this important subject? Indeed, not only for little daughters, but for growing and grown-up girls, should skilled teachers be employed, in sewing, dressmaking, embroidery and millinery, - just as they are provided for foreign languages, mathematics, art, music, etc. While I would not compel nor require every girl to become an adept in the domestic arts, still she deserves the opportunity of this training if she wishes it. Let us not forget that there is just as much system, order and discipline in sewing, as those other studies which tend to educate her for the fullest duties of life.

TitleText-Book On Domestic Art
AuthorCarrie Crane Ingalls
PublisherFoster & ten
Year1911
Copyright1911, Carrie Crane Ingalls
AmazonTextbook On Domestic Art: With Illustrations And Drafts
Text Book On Domestic Art

With illustrations and drafts by Carrie Crane Ingalls, teacher of domestic art in cogswell polyteclorical college

A Graduation Gown

A Graduation Gown.

-Acknowledgments
I can not let this little book go out without some attempt to express my indebtedness to the many friends who have aided me in its production. Some are teachers of this or other arts; some are the pup...
-Introduction
(Extracts from a lecture delivered before the C. T. A. Convention.) Since the universities and colleges have realized the importance of agricultural training for men, why is it not essential that the...
-Rules For Sewing
Clean hands Erect position Aluminum thimble Needles Thread Tape measure or rule The thimble is worn on the middle finger of the right hand. The length of thread should reach from shoulder to ha...
-Needles
1. Betweens (short, tailor) 1-12 2. Sharps (medium) 1-12 3. Milliners (long) 3-10 4. Embroidery (blunt or sharp point with long eye) 1-10 5. Darning (sharp point, long eye; larger than embroidery)...
-Thread
1. Basting 2. Sewing cotton 3. Glace cotton 4. Mercerized cotton 5. Luster cotton 6. Linen 7. Silk finish Thread varies from Nos. 16 to 200. 1. Basting cotton is the inferior cotton thread use...
-Sampler Number One. Plain Stitches
Overcast Hemming Blind or slip stitch Over and over Even baste Long baste Long and short baste Tailor's baste Running or gathering Three running and one back stitch tear into a dozen pieces e...
-Sampler Number One. Plain Stitches. Continued
Take three running stitches (see No. 5); go back one whole stitch in the same hole the last stitch ended, coming out twice the distance on under side of goods. Repeat. This is used for joining long se...
-Sampler Number Two. Three Cornered Patch On Striped, Figured Or Plaid Goods
Size of sampler 4 by 6 inches. Overcast all around the edge, using No. 90 cotton with a No. 9 needle. Cut a 3-inch, equilateral triangle in center of goods. Turn under the raw edges 1/4 of an inch, c...
-Sampler Number Three. Cashmere
Size 4 by 4 inches. Find right side of cashmere. The right and wrong sides of cloth are sometimes difficult to distinguish. The right side has a finish and often a luster or a nap, while the wrong s...
-Sewing Machines
History The first sewing machine was invented in 1755 in England by one Weisenthal. It was used wholly for embroidery and made a tambour or loop stitch, a name derived from the two-pointed needle wit...
-Sampler Number Four. Machine Work
This sampler is made with the lock stitch machine as the chain stitch machine has no binder attachment and also has a more definite right and wrong side, thus making it more complicated to do. However...
-Sampler Number Five. Buttonholes And Loops
Cut or tear a strip of cloth 12 inches long on the woof and 3 inches wide on the warp. Turn over the raw edges and fold on the length, basting and stitching the edges as near as possible. By cutting t...
-Apron
Material, 2 1/2 yards gingham (1 yard wide) for apron 32 inches long. Measurements: Waist (Model 24 inches). Length of dress (Model 32 inches). When buying material for apron, allow for twice the ...
-Ironing
The use of the iron is the last touch on finished work. It should be taught as soon as the first article is completed. Pressing is simplified by conveniences and shapes of all sorts. The skirt board, ...
-How To Sew On Buttons
Four-holed buttons are fastened to material either by crossing the threads or by making the threads parallel, either horizontally or vertically. The crossed threads are used for underclothes. Parallel...
-Hooks And Eyes
Hooks and eyes are used as a mode of fastening a garment or any article, where buttons and buttonholes or ball and sockets are not desired, or can not be used. They bring two edges together without ov...
-Ball And Sockets
Ball and sockets are used to lap flat surfaces together, and are preferred by many to the hook and eyes. They are manufactured in four sizes and in colors black and white. They are more expensive than...
-Textiles. Cotton
Cotton was known as early as 450 B. C., where in India, it superceded all other fabrics. It is a tropical plant, the United States growing three-quarters of the world's present supply. Texas leads in...
-Linen Flax, Ramie, Hemp, Jute, China Pineapple Grass
These are vegetable products used for weaving. Flax is a small annual plant 1 to 3 feet high with a blue flower, and is grown in all parts of the world. Linen fiber is procured from the flax plant -...
-Wool
Wool is the fleece of the sheep, goat, alpaca and camel. The warmth, softness, strength and susceptibility to take dye render wool the most valuable of all textiles. Its quality depends upon the clima...
-Silk
Silk, the most perfect of all fibers, is obtained from the cocoon of the silkworm and has few, if any, impurities. It is divided into two classes, the cultivated and the wild, the latter being found p...
-Part One - Questions
1. Name all the plain stitches and their uses. 2. State differences between the overcast and the over and over stitch. 3. Explain how a corner is mitered. 4. Describe needles and their sizes. 5. D...
-Drafted Garments
For Cotton Materials: Drawers. Five gored underskirt with dust ruffle and flounce. Shirt waist draft without sleeve. (a) Corset cover. (b) Chemise. (c) Night gown with sleeve. Plain tailored sh...
-Drawers
Measurements: Waist - Place a tape measure around the smallest part of the waist. Hips - With tape measure on waistline, measure 6 inches below, over fullest part of each hip, and pin. Place tape me...
-Drawers Yoke
Front Back Note With each draft, is given a model size of measurements, which must be altered and the pupil's own measurements substituted. Construct a rectangle from the following measureme...
-Skirt
Measurements: Waist Measure around smallest part of waist. Hips Measure 6 inches below waist as for drawers. Front Length Place tape measure in center of front at lower edge of waist and measure...
-Five-Gored Underskirt
Material, 5 yards, 36 inches wide, with flounce of same material, or 3 1/2 yards cloth and 4 yards hamburg or embroidery 12 inches deep. Cambric, Fruit of the Loom, Pride of the West, etc., are suita...
-Five-Gored Underskirt Proportions
1. Waist Make width of front gore 1/8 of the whole waist measurement, or 1/4 of half the waist. Make width of side gore 1/6 of the whole waist measurement, or 1/3 of half the waist. Make width of b...
-Five-Gored Underskirt Draft
Front Gore Take a full sheet of drafting paper. Mark lower edge of paper A. Dot 1 is the length of front up from A. Use dress length and not floor length. Dot 2 is 6 inches below Dot 1. Dot 3 is...
-Laying Paper Patterns On Cloth
Have material smooth before placing patterns on it. As the center of front gore is laid on a lengthwise fold, double the cloth accordingly, to equal the width of gore at bottom, allowing for seams, o...
-Dust Ruffle
Cut or tear as many warp strips of cloth as will measure once and a half the width it is to join, making each strip 4 inches wide when finished. Cut 5 inches to allow for hem. Join all the ends, makin...
-Flounce
Cut flounce like dust ruffle, making 12 inches deep or more. Join, hem and gather, matching pattern if embroidery is used. Tuck when goods is alike. Pin flounce to body of skirt even with the dust ruf...
-Drafts
Shirt Waist From the shirt waist draft are made the corset cover, the chemise and the nightgown in their order of progress. The shirt waist is given first, being the foundation for all of these, but i...
-Shirt Waist Measurements, Without Sleeve, For Corset Cover Draft
Neck Place tape measure closely around base of neck. (Model 13 inches.) Depth of Front Armseye, Armsize or Armhole - Place tape measure or string under the arms, fastening securely at side above bus...
-ShirtWaist Draft For Corset Cover
Front Take 1/2 sheet of drafting paper. Fold under 3 inches on longer side, before drafting, which is for front box pleat and fulness and is not included in draft. Construct half a rectangle, with ...
-Corset Cover Drafted From Shirtwaist
Connect 5 and 1 with downward curve (about 1/4 of circle). Dot 6 is a horizontal line to right of Dot 1, 1/2 the width of front. Dot 7 in 1 inch above Dot 6. Connect 5 and 7, the correct shoulder...
-Laying Pattern On The Cloth
Place back pattern on double thickness of cloth with lengthwise fold on center of back. Place front pattern on double thickness of cloth, with right sides together, the center front on warp. Pin alo...
-Chemise On Shirtwaist Draft Measurements
Length of back: Measure from center base of back neck to bend of knee. (Model 33 inches not including 5 inch ruffle.) Length of front: Measure from center base of front neck to knee. (Model 31 inch...
-Chemise Drafted From Shirt Waist
This draft may be worked out on paper first, or directly on the material to be used, with shirtwaist or corset cover draft as the foundation. As this model is given to allow the garment to slip over...
-Nightgown On Shirtwaist Draft
Measurements Length of Back: Measure from center base of back neck to floor. (Model 58 inches.) Length of Front: Measure from center base of front neck to floor. (Model 56 inches.) Material, 5 yar...
-Night Gown Drafted From Shirt Waist
The center back and front are laid on lengthwise folds, altho the gown opens at center front. Commence with back pattern of corset cover, with line 1 and 5, 3 inches to right of a lengthwise fold. ...
-Collar Band Draft To Open In Front
Measurements: Base of Neck Measure around base of neck, close measure. (Model 13 inches.) Top of Neck Measure around top of neck, close measure. (Model 12 inches.) Draft Construct rectangle, 1/2...
-Sleeve For Night-Gown Or Shirtwaist
Measurements 1 - Armseye, Armsize, or Armhole: Measure smoothly around top of arm over the shoulder (Model 15 inches). 2 - Shoulder to Elbow: Bend elbow tightly with arm even with shoulder. Measure f...
-Sleeve Draft
Take half sheet of drafting paper, fold on length, so the dimensions equal about 26 by 12 inches. Have fold at left side while drafting. Mark top at left corner A. Dot 1 is 1 inch below A. (This poin...
-Shirt Waist
(Plain Tailored) Material, 2 1/2 yards, 36 inches wide. (Linen, cheviot, madras, lawn, gingham, etc.) Measurements: Use shirt waist or corset cover draft on page 90, for body of shirt waist, and s...
-Shirt Waist Sleeve
Use sleeve draft of nightgown, allowing more fulness if desired on Dots 1, 5, 6, and 7, as explained in draft. A cuff 3 inches deep has been allowed on draft. A wider or narrower cuff may be used by ...
-Plain Five-Gored Dress Skirt With Habit Or Pleated Back
Material: Khaki, linen, gingham, etc. Use drafted pattern of the 5-gored underskirt, omitting line 5, 11 and 8 on the back gore. For habit or plain back, trace line 4, 6 and 7 on the cloth, Dot 11 on...
-Kilted Or Pleated Skirt
Material: 5 yards, 36 inches wide. Width around bottom 4 yards. Measurements taken the same as for preceding skirt, but no turning line is given for the bottom of skirt, because the pleats are laid o...
-Fancy Waist Made From Plain Shirtwaist Pattern, And Opening Behind
Material: 3 yards, 36 inches wide. Pongee, taffeta, swiss, muslin, etc. A fancy waist can be best designed if opened at center back. A front yoke should have no seam on center front, but cut from on...
-Collar Draft, To Fasten At Back
Measurements: Base of Neck (Model 13 inches). Top of Neck (Model 12 inches). Height of Collar (Model 2 1/2 inches). Rectangle equals 1/2 the neck measurement for horizontal lines by height of coll...
-Circular Underskirt Drafted From Gored Underskirt, With Flounces, But No Dust Ruffle
Material 5 1/4 yards, 36 inches wide. Sateen, moreen, hyde-grade, etc. Use same measurements as for 5-gored underskirt, deducting 15 inches for flounce above dress length. Take full size sheet dra...
-French Lining
Measurements Material 2 1/2 yards for 36 bust. Heavy cotton, silesia, percaline, etc. All measurements should be taken without dress waist on. Front Neck: Measure closely around base of neck (Mode...
-French Lining Draft
Front Draw half a rectangle with vertical line about 25 inches long, and horizontal line to right, about 12 inches long. Mark corner A. Dot 1 is 1/5 the whole neck measurement plus 1/4 inch down fro...
-How To Place Lining Pattern On Cloth And Put Together
Front Place front pattern on cloth according to warp as indicated by lines or circles, allowing 2 inches extra on front edge to be turned under and used as a facing for hooks and eyes. Trace all arou...
-How To Bone A Tight Lining
Feather bone, whalebone and steel are used to bone a lining or dress. The easiest to sew on, and perhaps the most satisfactory, is feather bone, because it does not require a casing, and is so made th...
-Working On Woolen Goods
Woolens or mixed weaves are much more difficult to cut out, join and finish than cotton materials, consequently a different method is used in working with them. This method is called tailoring, and in...
-Seven-Gored Tailored Skirt
Note. A choice should be given between this and the following skirt. Material: Four yards (without nap) 36 inches wide. Serge, broadcloth, homespun, cashmere, etc. Measurements: See directions f...
-Waist
Front gore 1/6 of half the waist measurement or 1/12 of the whole. Back gore 1/4 of half the waist measurement, or 1/8 of the whole. Side gores 7/12 of half the waist measurement, or 7/24 of the ...
-Hip
Front gore 1 inch wider than the front waist. Back gore - 3 inches wider than the back waist. Side gores The sum of the front and back subtracted from 1/2 the whole hip measurement, dividing in hal...
-Tailored Belt
Cut a warp strip of same material as skirt, 3 inches longer than waist measurement, and 1 1/4 inches on the double, allowing for seams. Point one end of belt and make the other straight. Have an int...
-Nine-Gored Tailored Skirt
Material, 4 3/4 yards (without nap) 36 inches wide. Measurements: Same as 5 or 7 gored skirt pattern. A nine-gored skirt pattern has a front, back, and three side gores, and is drafted in proportion...
-Gored Skirt
Waist Line Front 1st Side 2nd Side 3rd Side Back Model 1 1/2. ..... 2 2/3 ...2 2/3.. ...2 2/3.. ...2 1/2 Hip ...
-How To Sew Braid On Bottom Of Skirt
When sewing braid on skirt, baste 1/16 or 1/8 inch beyond edge of turned hem, starting 2 inches to right of center back seam, and basting on edge of hem on right side. Carry braid 2 inches to left of ...
-Coat (Unlined)
Made on French lining model. Material 4 yards 36 inches wide, for 36 bust. Linen, duck, kahki, etc. Measurements: Take same measurements as for French lining, measuring over dress waist. Make c...
-Questions
1. What measurements are necessary to draft a drawers pattern? Draw illustration with the dots. 2. What is the sewing line? 3. What is a lap, how deep should it be and how put on? 4. What measureme...
-Glossary Of Textiles
Note: As widths vary and prices fluctuate in different cities, it is impossible to give any accurate figure that can be followed in all cities, but an approximate retail price and width are here given...
-Glossary Of Textiles. Continued
Glace Glace, a glossy or luster finish given to threads and fabrics. Grass Linen Grass Linen, a thin, transparent muslin (usually natural colored), made from ramie. It is used for lining. Width 27 ...
-Embroidery Samplers
Hemstitch or Drawn Work Sampler. Hemstitched Hand Towel. Embroidery Stitch Sampler. Center Piece in all White Work. Colored Embroidery Piece of Filo Silk. Lace Stitch Sampler. Lace Design. Hemstitc...
-Hand Towel
Material: Plain linen toweling or huckaback, 12 inches wide and 24 inches long. This includes hem. On either end of towelling, turn a l 1/2-inch hem (finished). From the hemstitched sampler, choose a...
-Embroidery
Embroidery is the art of ornamental needle work, used to decorate or enrich textile fabrics of all kinds. It must be worked or woven on a solid background, which distinguishes it from tapestry or lac...
-Embroidery Sampler
Material: Cotton or linen cloth, 12 inches (warp) by 9 inches (woof). On three sides of cut sampler, turn a 1/4 inch hem. Crease and fold in opposite direction, where edge of hem meets. This method o...
-Embroidery Sampler. Continued
Go back into same hole as needle came out of, and take another stitch the same length, letting needle separate the loop of preceding stitch. This stitch resembles the crochet stitch or the stitch on t...
-Center Piece In All White Work
Material: One-third yard white linen, cut oval or round, 12 inches in diameter, containing design for satin, eyelet, cut work applique, or any combinations of these. The edges of sampler are finishe...
-Colored Embroidery Piece Of Filo Silk
Material: One-half yard silk or linen (of any color), cut square or rectangle to contain not less than 9 square inches of embroidery. These dimensions are given in correlation with the drawing departm...
-Lace Stitches
The variety of lace stitches is numberless, and may be applied to all kinds of braids, which are formed to make designs to be worked out with cotton, flax or silk threads. Almost all the embroidery s...
-Lace Sampler
Material: Two yards Battenburg braid 1/4 inch wide. Two skeins No. 25 flax or linen thread. Baste braid to paper, cambric or holland, in parallel lines 1/4 inch apart, or in squares or circles, a...
-Designed Lace Piece
Draw or buy design for battenburg, for center piece, collar, fan or any pattern desired, to contain 12 square inches of embroidery. From the sampler stitches and others explained, make lace piece. I...
-Questions #2
1. What is hemstitching, and when used? 2. What is embroidery, and when do we first hear of it? 3. What are the differences between plain, embroidery and lace stitches? 4. How are embroidery stitch...









TOP
previous page: Spool Knitting | by Mary A. McCormack
  
page up: Needlework Books
  
next page: School Needlework. A Course of Study in Sewing Designed For Use In Schools | by Olive C. Hapgood