The work of the Homes has grown in complexity with each successive year.

The children in the earlly days were gathered chiefly from the London Blums, and quenlly they came wild and neglec ted. Now they come from all parts of the kingdom, and irom every conceivable kind of misfortune. Some of the children have been brought to destitution by sudden calamity some by the folly 01 sins of their parents. Some come after good schooling, others are ignoranl and neglected. M any are so mentally deficient that ordinary school machinery seems to be wasted on them. Some are blind, some deal and dumb; many defective in other ways.

Where The Children Live

It used to be a heartbreaking affair to deliver them from the tyranny of fear or defiance. Now the work of civilising the children is to a great extent done. Now also many children come in their infancy, and they are sent to the Babies' Castle, Hawkhurst, or the infant schools at Barking-side, or boarded out. The Babies' Castle. Haw khnrst. is a home for 120 infants.

In the Girls' village Home, Barkingside, llford, Essex, there are 1,300 girls in residence - 80 separate households and buildings, including 67 cottages, a village church, day schools, embroidery school, hospital. sanatorium for consumptives, and a laundry.

A Boys' Garden City is now in progress, to give the boys the same advantages the girls at the Village Home. Barkingside, have for so many years enjoyed. A well-wooded estate of 39 acres at Woodford Bridge, Essex, has been purchased, and progress has been made in laying it out. Ten houses have been promised already (1910).

One of the East End homes - the Labour

House for Destitute Youths - has been closed.

and the inmates have been transferred to

Woodford Bridge, and are now living in the main block on the new estate. The children will there benefit physically and morally.

Emigration

Emigration has proved successful., and. besides the boys and girls sent to Canada,

473 young people have been plated in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. These young people are kept under supervision, and in the course of the past year 50 former emigrant girls have married in Canada, many of them into independent positions. One of the ealiest emigrants was a boy named James C------. He came to the home in 1886, aged 16, but stunted in growth, ragged, dirty, and thin. He was undisciplined, and neither knew nor cared for his heritage of boyhood. He settled down admirably when he came to learn, at the home, that life had an object and he 1 turned out well.

Jem was one of the first fourteen bo sent out to Canada. "Gimme a chance." had been Jem's cry, and once the chance given, he seized it with an eager hand. On a farm in Ontario he first made his mark. Then Jem moved west, and yet west again.

each time leaving golden opinions behind him. Now he has been married for some years, and to a Barnardo girl. He owns his farm, one of the prettiest m the district On it is an excellent house store-houses etc., erected chiefly by Jem himself. He and his wife have earned the respect and esteem of the neighbourhood. They have in this house a Barnardo boy, who is learning to be farmer. So Jem is now holding out the reseue hand, as it was held out to himself.

In Her Majesty s Hospital for Sick Children at the Stepney Home. This beautifully equipped hospital has 84 beds, and forms part of the wonderful block of buildings that constitute the Home Photograph taken at Dr. Barnardo's

In Her Majesty s Hospital for Sick Children at the Stepney Home. This beautifully equipped hospital has 84 beds, and forms part of the wonderful block of buildings that constitute the Home Photograph taken at Dr. Barnardo's