A three panel fire screen of conventional floral designs, embroidered in gold thread, and framed in black wood and covered with glass

A three-panel fire-screen of conventional floral designs, embroidered in gold thread, and framed in black wood and covered with glass

Procure some students' water-colours ; they can be bought at most art depots at twopence a tube. Take a fairly large camel-hair brush, and mix some rose madder with yellow ochre and white until a rich, soft, peachlike colour has been obtained, and carefully tint the background of the flowers, the branches and leaves with this, leaving the design standing out boldly in pure white satin. Mix some rose madder and cobalt blue together until a soft purple shade has been obtained, and tint the range of mountains with this, and, when dry, the embroidery may be commenced. The flowers can be simply outlined in black filoselle, dark green silk, or gold thread. The centres are worked thickly in French knots in gold silk or gold thread, with a touch of rose pink. The leaves are worked around their petals in delicate shades of green, either using satin stitch, in radiating lines if desired, or embroidery stitch.

The latter is effective, as the system of working a long and short stitch is distinctly pleasing when worked around the edges of the petals of flowers or leaves. The veinings of the leaves are worked in various shades of green in stem stitch. The branches are worked thickly in exquisite shades of golden brown in embroidery stitch, and when completed the branches look curiously " mossy " and realistic. A minute group of birds may be worked in stem stitch, using gold thread, and black or white filoselle.

beautiful screen with a design of lanterns suspended from bamboos. If worked on pale gold satin.

the lanterns should be tinted golden red to suggest the light within. The framework of the screen should be black, and the top of the panels be of drawn silk or satin

the lanterns should be tinted golden red to suggest the light within. The framework of the screen should be black, and the top of the panels be of drawn silk or satin

We now come to the effective little landscape lying beneath the bough of blossom. The mountains, the tower, the tree, and decorative blades of grass are outlined carefully in black, and there is a suggestion of green about the trees. This design would make a charming fire-screen, and would look well in a bamboo frame, or in a frame made of deal, and stained black. The panel in this case should be covered with glass.

The dull black wooden frame will enhance the beauty of the colouring of the satin and embroidery in the most perfect manner. Another charming fire-screen could be made by tracing conventional floral designs on three panels as shown in one of the illustrations. The designs are embroidered in gold thread, and ultimately framed in black wood, and covered with glass.

If the former design is chosen for a large screen three other panels will be required. A large tiger lily, and, beneath, a little Japanese village, a stream, and a bushy tree. This would make a delightful panel treated in the same manner as the first. Another effective idea would be some tall bamboo-trees running up the panel. In the distance the sacred snow mountain, the sea, and the square sail of a ship.

A beautiful screen could be made by choosing a pale golden satin for the panels. On the panels sketch, or have stamped, some effective lanterns swaying on bamboo sticks.

A delightful suggestion tor using Japanese prints on a screen of black wood, with panels of silk, corresponding in colour with the tone of the room in which the screen is placed

A delightful suggestion tor using Japanese prints on a screen of black wood, with panels of silk, corresponding in colour with the tone of the room in which the screen is placed

Tint the lanterns a soft but realistic golden red to imitate the glow of a lantern that has a light within. Outline the lantern in gold thread, black filoselle, or flame-coloured silks. The top and bottom of the lantern are worked thickly in black, and the design on the lantern would be effective worked in black filoselle with touches of gold thread. These panels would be most effective when arranged to form the lower portion of the panels of the screen, especially if the framework is of black wood. The top of the panels could be made of drawn silk or satin. A screen with a framework of black wood could be renovated with panels of silk to correspond with the colour scneme of the room. Underneath, several laths of wood are arranged, and, when covered with the silk panels, brass nails can be fixed into the wood. Japanese prints will look delightful when hung on such a screen, and would add distinctly to the artistic charm of the room.

A flight of birds would make still another effective design for a screen. The embroidering of birds makes quite a fascinating subject for the needlewoman. It is quite an art in itself to imitate the delicate markings of wing and feather, and the Japanese are adepts at this delicate form of work. * Many people like blue for their walls and when Japanese effects are desired there is surely no colour which lends itself more successfully to the subtle charm of the East than that soft greyish turquoise blue which we sometimes find in the most unexpected places It is a colour which reminds one of faded silk, but this quality only adds to its charm.

If one is fortunate enough to possess already such a colour scheme, "blue birds," embroidered in sofl rich shades of blue, would look exquisite if worked on silk to tone with the wallpaper of the room. The wings could be embroidered in blocks to intensify the ridged feather effect.

Blues were never more gorgeous than they are at present, so that the design might be worked in the entire range of this soft celestial shade. The beaks of the birds should be embroidered solidly in satin stitch using gold thread. Should a raised effect be desired, the beaks could be padded with a coarse cotton. When the padding is completed, the gold thread is worked evenly over the cotton.

Bullrushes are also delightfully decorative when worked on panels of silk for a screen, especially if this was intended for a room where the general colour scheme gives the impression of autumnal tints. The reeds may be worked entirely in gold with soft shades of brown.