The Memory Professor's Forgetfulness - A Terrible Predicament - How to Avoid It - What the Useful Tablet Should Note - The Task of Running a House - A Pretty and Useful Aid to Memory

If the lecturer on memory had possessed a memorandum tablet, he need never have become the laughing-stock of the world through leaving his umbrella behind him.

A pretty memorandum tablet suitable for a morning room or bedroom. Care should be taken to make the flap of wallpaper over the block lift easily. If backed with cardboard, it will not become crumpled by use

A pretty memorandum tablet suitable for a morning-room or bedroom. Care should be taken to make the flap of wallpaper over the block lift easily. If backed with cardboard, it will not become crumpled by use

Make a note of it when you promise to go to tea with your dear friend; you may be invited by a dearer, and forget your first engagement, or even invite your dearest and forget the other two.

Make a note of it when you make an engagement with the dressmaker for a fitting.

Make a note of it that two people for your third bridge table cannot come, and therefore two more must be asked.

Make a note of it when you promise chrysanthemum cuttings to a friend that you must tell the gardener to send them.

Make a note of it that the new book of travels is ordered from Mudie's before you dine with the Browns, and the traveller-author himself takes you down to dinner.

Make a note of it that Maudie must have the special dancing shoes, that Tommy's pyjamas are wearing thin, and that the eiderdown in the blue room wants remaking.

Make a note of it to find out what was the savoury your husband liked so much at the City dinner last night, and try to get the recipe.

Make a note of it that Dollie wants chocolate icing on her birthday cake this year.

Make a note of it to engage the conjurer.

Make a note of it that the kitchen boiler cleaning is due next week, and a day must be appointed when you are dining out.

And so on, ad infinitum. Was ever such a complicated business as the running of a house? How is the brain of one woman to contain all the above and a great deal more? It is a very beautiful thought that the house mother holds the reins of home government in her hands, but the complex management of house, husband, and children would tax many departments if undertaken with accurate attention to detail.

Yet a woman is expected to do it all. Not in a nice business office where, free from interruption, she can concentrate her mind on the intricate task before her, but in the midst of her home cares, the prey of every incompetent maid who asks for directions at the wrong time, of neighbours who drop in before the work of the day is half planned out, or of the interruption of tiny questioners who want to know "why" and "how" and "when" in this big world which is so strange and beautiful.

How shall a woman remember every odd job unless she makes a note of it, and the little block where a line can be jotted down saves many a tiresome complication caused by the overlooking of a little duty.

A tablet covered with wallpaper of the pattern shown would accord well with a dining room, library, or hall. Taste will dictate in each case the use of a suitable paper

A tablet covered with wallpaper of the pattern shown would accord well with a dining-room, library, or hall. Taste will dictate in each case the use of a suitable paper

After reading the foregoing suggestions, someone may ask "what would be a pretty yet useful device in the form of a notebook suitable for hanging in a room or hall-passage?"

Truly a very simple matter to settle, and an inexpensive one.

All that is required is a memorandum block of the desired size with detachable leaves, a strip of pretty wallpaper, a piece of stout cardboard, a programme pencil, adhesive paste, and natty fingers. The cardboard should be cut clean and true, and covered with the wallpaper. The block is then pasted on securely, and a neat flap of wallpaper, stiffened with cardboard, fixed upon it. A holder of cardboard covered with wallpaper holds the pencil.

The two illustrations show how the little articles look when finished, though, of course, the success or failure of the work will depend upon the taste and neat execution of the worker. It would be excellent to put one of these memorandum tablets in each room; if that is done, see that the paper used in its manufacture accords with the colouring of the rooms in which it is placed.

Making these interesting trifles will amuse children or invalids, and they form most acceptable gifts and contributions to bazaars. They have also the supreme merit of not outliving their usefulness, and when soiled or filled can be thrown away.