Raspberry Water Ice

Two pottles of the best scarlet pines, one pint of syrup, half a pint of water, and the juice of two lemons.

Mix as currant. All red fruits require the addition of a little prepared cochineal to heighten the colour.

Apricot Water Ice

Eighteen or twenty fine ripe apricots, according to their size, half a pint of syrup, half a pint of water, the juice of two lemons.

Mash the apricots and pass them through a sieve, mix the pulp with the syrup water and lemon-juice, break the stones, blanch the kernels, and pound them fine with a little water, pass them through a sieve, add it to the mixture, and freeze.

Peach Water Ice

One pound of the pulp of ripe peaches, half a pint of syrup, half a pint of water, the juice of two lemons. Mix as apricot. If the fruit is not ripe enough to pulp, open them and take out the stones, put them in a stew-pan with the syrup and water,boil until tender, and pass them through a sieve; mix in the pounded kernels; when cold, freeze.

Damson Ice

One quart of damsons, one pint of syrup, half a pint of water. Mix as peach ice. Magnum-bonums, Orleans, greengages, or any other plum may be done in the same way.

7 *

Pine-Apple Water Ice

Half a pint of pine syrup, one pint of water, the juice of two lemons, and three or four slices of preserved pine cut into small dice; mix and freeze.

Fresh Pine-Apple Water Ice

One pound of pine-apple, one pint of syrup, half a pint of water, and the juice of two lemons. Cut the pine in pieces, and put it into a stew-pan with the syrup and water, and boil until tender; pass it through a sieve, add the lemon-juice, with two or three slices of the pine cut in small dice, mix and freeze when cold. The pine may be pounded instead of being boiled, and mixed with the syrup, etc.

The whole of these ices may be made with preserved fruit instead of fresh.

One pound of jam or jelly, one pint of water, the juice of two lemons, and syrup sufficient to make it palatable.

Apple-Water Ice

Pare and core some fine apples, cut them in pieces into a preserving pan with sufficient water for them to float, boil until they are reduced to a marmalade, then strain: to a pint of apple-water add half a pint of syrup, the juice of a lemon, and a little water; when cold, freeze.

Pear-Water Ice

Prepare as apple ice.

Orange-Water Ice

One pint of China orange-juice, one pint of syrup, half a pint of water, the juice of four large lemons.

Rub off the yellow rind of six oranges and two lemons on sugar, scrape it off and mix with the strained juice, syrup and water.

Punch-Water Ice

Make either a good lemon ice, or use some orange-juice with the lemons, in the proportion of one orange to two lemons; either rub off the yellow rind of the lemons on sugar, or pare it very thin, and soak it in the spirit for a few hours; when the ice is beginning to set, work in the whites of three eggs to each quart, beaten to a strong froth, and mixed with sugar as for meringue, or add the whites without whisking them; when it is nearly frozen, take out the pot from the ice, and mix well with it a glass each of rum and brandy, or sufficient to make it a good flavour; some like the taste of the rum to predominate, but in this case of course you will be guided by the wish of your employer. In general the prevailing flavour distinguishes it by name, as rum-punch or brandy-punch ice; after the spirit is well mixed, replace the pot and finish freezing. If champagne, arrack, or tea is added, it is then termed champagne-punch ice, arrack-punch ice, etc.