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The Complete Cook | by J. M. Sanderson



Plain and practical directions for cooking and housekeeping; with upwards of seven hundred receipts: consisting of directions for the choice of meat and poultry preparations for cooking, making of broths and soups; boiling, roasting, baking, and frying of meats, fish, etc. Seasonings, colourings, cooking vegetables; preparing salads, clarifying; making of pastry, puddings, gruels, gravies, garnishes, etc. And, with general directions for making wines. With additions and alterations

TitleThe Complete Cook
AuthorJ. M. Sanderson
PublisherLea And Blanchard
Year1846
Copyright1843, Lea And Blanchard
AmazonThe Complete Cook

by J. M. Sanderson, Of the Franklin House.

-Preface To The English Edition
The following work has been written, not only with the view of furnishing a complete Cookery Book, but also for the purpose of in structing, in a simple manner, inexperienced mistresses and servants, ...
-Preface To The American Edition
It is said that Good wine needs no bush, and according to the same rule a good book should require no apology, (as a preface generally appears to be). In this instance, as we are not the author, we ...
-Relative Duties Of Mistress And Maid
In this our little work, we more particularly address ourselves to Cook Maids in small families, where two maid servants only are kept, and where, consequently, all the business of the kitchen falls u...
-Make Yourself Useful
Endeavour to promote the comfort of every individual in the family; let it be manifest that you are desirous to do rather more than is required of you, than less than your duty; they merit little who ...
-Introductory General Remarks On Cookery - Importance Of Good Cookery As Regards Health And Temperance
It is an old, and somewhat vulgar saying, though very expressive, that God sends meat, and the devil cooks. This adage shows, that cooking has always been considered of some importance in this count...
-Importance Of Good Cookery As Regards Health And Temperance. Continued
There are people who imagine, that it is beneath the dignity of a philosopher to trouble himself about eating; such a one was that gay fribble of a marquis, who, finding Descartes enjoying himself ove...
-Philosophical Cookery - Count Romford
The first person, perhaps, with any pretensions to learning and philosophy, who studied the dressing of meat, for food, as a science, was a gentleman of the name of Thompson, who was afterwards create...
-Philosophical Cookery - Count Romford. Continued
As soon as the soup is served up, the ingredients for the next meal are put into the pot (which is never suffered to cool, and does not require scouring;) and this pot, which is of cast iron, or of ea...
-What Must Always Be Done, And What Must Never Be Done
1. Keep yourself clean and tidy; let your hands, in particular, be always clean whenever it is practicable. After a dirty job always wash them. A cleanly cook must wash her hands many times in the cou...
-22. Mutton
Good mutton is firm in the grain; of a bright red colour; the lean delicately interlarded with thin streaks of fat; the fat itself being of a brightish white, tinted with a delicate pink. The fat of r...
-24. Veal
This meat, to be truly good, delicate, fine flavoured, and tender, ought not to be more than five or six weeks old, and, of course, fed exclusively upon the milk of the mother. Writers on cookery grav...
-26. Pork
The quality of this kind of meat depends in a great measure upon its feeding. If grossly fed, it is bad, for the pig will eat any thing in the absence of delicate food. Dairy-fed pork we are told is t...
-Choice Of Poultry, Eggs, And Fish, And Seasons Of Fish
Poultry of all kinds are preferred of a short thick make, broad and plump in the breast and thick in the rump and fat in the back. The spurs should be short as indicating youth, and the comb red as in...
-33. Eggs
New eggs have always a rough fresh-looking shell, but this appearance may be effected by artificial means, and the purchaser be cheated with rotten ones, instead of getting fresh. A new-laid egg will ...
-35. Seasons Of Fish
There are some kinds of fish absolutely poisonous eaten out of season; such are salmon, and skate. The following will give some idea of the seasons of fish, but they vary according to the weather. Cod...
-Preparations For Cooking
38. A great deal has to be done before the cook can commence the operation of cooking. She has to truss her fowls and prepare her fish, butcher's meat, and vegetables, with other things not necessary ...
-Preparations For Cooking. Continued
[Trussed Duck for roasting.] 46. Geese are trussed exactly in the same way as ducks, except the feet are cut off, and dressed with the giblets. The liver is some-times dressed separately, and consi...
-58. Fish Without Scales, etc
Cod, mackerel, whiting, and some other fish, being without scales, need nothing doing to them except drawing them and washing or wiping. Sprats, for broiling, should have a long bird-skewer run throug...
-66. Clear Gravy Soups
Cut half a pound of ham into slices, and lay them at the bottom of a large stew-pan, or stock pot, with two or three pounds of veal and the same weight of lean beef; break the bones and lay them on th...
-68. Hotch-Potch
Take lamb or mutton chops, and stew them in good gravy, with the addition of almost every kind of vegetable. A summer hotch-potch is composed of young onions, carrots, asparagus, green peas, lettuce, ...
-72. Pease Soup
-Put a quart of split peas to three quarts of boiling water, not more (Dr. Kitchiner says cold water,) with half a pound of bacon, not very fat, or roast beef bones, or four anchovies; or, instead of ...
-75. Spanish Soup
Take about three pounds of beef, off the leg or shin, with or without the bone - if with the bone, well crack it - a pound of knuckle of ham, or gammon. More than cover them with water, and when it bo...
-83. Giblet Soup
The most economical way is to take a pound or two of beef skirts, or of knuckle of veal; cut it into pieces two or three inches square; a set of goose giblets, or four sets of ducks', or the head, nec...
-84. Kitchiner's Cheap Soup
Wash in cold water four ounces of Scotch barley, and put into five quarts of water, with four ounces of sliced onions; boil gently one hour, and pour it into a pan; then put into a saucepan from one t...
-85. Soup Maigre
Divide two or three heads of celery, two large carrots, three or four moderate-sized turnips, some onions, two young lettuces, a handful of spinach leaves, and a little sorrel. Cut the Worst half of t...
-86. Mock Turtle
Have the head and broth ready for the soup the day before it is to be eaten; it will take eight hours to prepare it properly. Get the calf's head with the skin on, the fresher the better, take out the...
-87. Carrot Soup
Wash and scrape six large carrots, peel off the red outside (which is the only part used for this soup), put it into a gallon stew-pan, with one head of celery, and an onion cut into thin pieces; take...
-89. Eel Soup
To make a tureen full, take two middling sized onions, cut them in half, and cross your knife over them two or three times; put two ounces of butter into a stew-pan; when it is melted, put in the onio...
-95. Hare, Rabbit, Or Partridge Soup
When hares and rabbits and other game are too tough to eat (in the ordinary way of cooking,) they will make very good soup. Cut off the legs and shoulders of a hare, divide the body crossways, and ste...
-96. Portable Soup
The fresher the meat is from which thi3 article is made the better. Shins or legs of beef answer very well, and you may add trimmings of fresh meat, poultry, or game, and the liquor in which a leg of ...
-97. Green Turtle Soup
This recipe has been collated from the best authorities, to which is added our own experience. The day before you wish to serve up the soup it will be necessary to cut off the head of your turtle, and...
-Broths Or Stocks, Glaze And Gravies
These articles are all nearly allied to each other, differing principally in degrees of strength. In extensive establishments, a large quantity of stock, both brown and white, is constantly kept. Stoc...
-99. First Stock, Or Beef Broth, Etc
Wash a leg or shin of beef very clean; let the butcher crack the bone in two or three places, and take out the marrow; add meat trimmings, and heads, necks, gizzards, feet, etc, of game and poultry; c...
-104. Gravy For Roast Meat
Take the trimmings off the joint you are about to cook, which will make half a pint of plain gravy. Colour by adding a few drops of burnt sugar. If you do not wish to make gravy in this way, about hal...
-107. Rich Brown Gravy For Poultry, Ragout, Or Game
If your stock or store gravy is poor, to enrich it add one pound of meat to one pint of your store gravy; cut the meat clear from the bones, chop it up as fine as mince meat, chop also one ounce of ha...
-Sauces
These are a very numerous class of condiments, particularly in French cookery. Foreigners say that the English have only one sauce (melted butter) for vegetables, fish, flesh, and all other eatables r...
-Boiling
As this is the most common mode of preparing food for human sustenance, it is therefore the more necessary that its principles should be well understood; for though the operations of boiling may appea...
-Boiling - Butcher's Meat And Poultry
The general directions which we have given for boiling in the preceding pages, if they have been well studied by the young cook, as we trust they have, render it useless for us to go into the question...
-167. Boiled Beef
Fresh boiled beef is called beef bouilli by some, but in the French kitchen the term means fresh beef dressed, without absolutely boiling, it being suffered only to simmer till it is done. Indeed, it ...
-178. Calf's Head, Boiled
Let it be cut in half by the butcher, and all the inside bones removed; take out the brains, wash the head well in several waters, with a little salt, to draw out the blood; boil it slowly in plenty o...
-184. Bacon, Ham, Tongues
First, well wash and scrape clean. If very salt, it may soak in cold water a few hours; allow plenty of water, fresh rain or river water is best; put it in when the chill is off, and let it be a good ...
-185. To Poach Eggs
The best vessel for this purpose is a frying pan; but it must be kept for that purpose only, or the grease will adhere to the water, and spoil the delicate appearance of the eggs. A wide-mouthed stew-...
-193. Soles, Fried
Having cleaned, wipe them thoroughly dry, and keep them in a coarse cloth an hour or two before using. In case any moisture should remain, flour them all over, and again wipe it off. They may be fried...
-195. Cod
The head and shoulders, comprehending in weight two-thirds or three-quarters of the fish, is much better dressed separately; the tail being much thinner would be broken to pieces before the thicker pa...
-203. Broiled Mackerel
Cut a slit in the back that they may be thoroughly done. Lay them on a clean gridiron (having greased the bars), over a clear, but rather slow, fire. Sprinkle pepper and salt over them; when thoroughl...
-216. Salt Fish
It should be soaked a considerable time in soft water, changing the water two or three times. The length of time required will be according to the hardness or softness of the fish. One night will do f...
-217. Terrapins
This is a favourite dish for suppers and parties; and, when well cooked, they are certainly very delicious. Many persons in Philadelphia have made themselves famous for cooking this article alone. Mrs...
-219. Oysters, Stewed
For this purpose the beard or fringe is generally taken off. If this is done, set on the beards with the liquor of the oysters, and a little white gravy, rich but unseasoned; having boiled a few minut...
-Roasting
223. Mind that your spit is clean, and take care that it passes through the meat as little as possible. Before it is spitted, see that the meat is jointed properly, particularly necks and loins. When ...
-Roasting, Broiling, And Frying
Before entering into any detail as to the best method of preparing the different dishes under this head, we must recommend the young cook to again carefully read our preliminary observations on roasti...
-239. Roasting Veal
This meat requires particular care to roast it a nice brown; the fire should be the same as for beef; a sound large fire for a large joint, and a brisker for a smaller: soak thoroughly, and then bring...
-242. Roasting Lamb
To the usual accompaniments of roasted meat, lamb requires green mint sauce or salad, or both. Some cooks, about five minutes before it is done, sprinkle it with a little fresh-gathered and finely min...
-243. Roasting Pork
If this meat be not well done, thoroughly well done, it is disgusting to the sight and poisonous to the stomach. In the gravy of pork, if there is the least tint of redness, says Dr. Kitchiner, it ...
-244. Leg Of Pork Roasted Without The Skin; Or Mock Goose
Parboil a leg of pork, take off the skin, and then put it down to roast; baste it with butter, and make a savoury powder of finely minced or dried or powdered sage, ground black pepper, salt, and some...
-248. Turkey, Turkey Poults, And Other Poultry
A fowl and a turkey require the same management at the fire, only the latter will take longer time. Let them be carefully picked, break the breastbone (to make them look plump,) and thoroughly singe t...
-253. Haunch Of Venison
To preserve the fat, make a paste of flour and water, as much as will cover the haunch; wipe it with a dry cloth in every part; rub a large sheet of paper all over with butter, and cover the venison w...
-274. Stuffing For Pike, Carp, Or Haddock
A dozen oysters bearded and chopped, two yolks of eggs, a small onion, or two cloves of eschalot and a few sprigs of parsley chopped fine, season with cayenne, mace, allspice, pepper, and salt; add th...
-Baking Meat, Etc
283. As baking is the only means by which the poor inhabitants of towns for the most part can enjoy a joint of meat at home,* we shall say a word or two upon the subject, particularly with regard to ...
-Frying
294. Frying, as is properly observed by Dr. Kitchiner, is often a convenient mode of cookery; it may be performed by a fire which will not do for roasting or boiling, and by the introduction of the ...
-300. Steaks
Cut them rather thinner than for broiling; put some butter, or, what is much cheaper and quite as good, some clarified dripping or suet, into an iron frying-pan, and when it is quite hot put in the st...
-302. Sausages
Sausages are not good unless they are quite fresh. Put a bit of butter or dripping into a frying-pan, before it gets hot put in the sausages, shake the pan, and keep turning them (be careful not to br...
-Broiling
308. Let your gridiron be quite clean, particularly between the bars, and keep it bright on the top. Before using it, you should be careful to make the bars thoroughly hot, or otherwise that part of ...
-312. Steaks And Chops
Meat to be broiled should be hung till it is tender; the inside of a sirloin of beef, cut into steaks, is greatly preferred by most people. But steaks are generally cut from the rump (the middle is th...
-Braising, Glazing, Blanching, Larding, And Boning
316. A braiser, or braising pan, is a sort of oblong camp kettle, with a bordered lid, on which, and secured by the border, is put small burning coal, charcoal, or wood ashes. The lid should fit the ...
-Colouring, Or Browning
322. The greater part of the preparations for colouring are very unwholesome, or, in other words, very indigestible. They are employed to give the appearance of richness, but they are worse than ...
-Thickenings
323. Flour, or some other farinaceous article, is, or ought to be, the basis of all thickening's; starch of potatoes, or indeed any other pure starch, is a good substitute for flour. We do not ...
-Flavourings
325. Judiciously prepared flavourings are of the first importance in the higher branches of cookery, and indeed, they are indispensably necessary in all descriptions of made dishes. The principal ...
-326. To Prepare Sweet Herbs For Keeping
It is highly desirable, according to the taste and style of living of the family, that preparations of sweet herbs, either in powder, dried bunches (the powder is best,) or in the form of essences and...
-340. Calf's Head
Take the half of one, with the skin on; put it into a large stew-pan, with as much water as will cover it, a knuckle of ham, and the usual accompaniments of onions, herbs, etc., and let it simmer till...
-352. Shin Or Leg Of Beef Stewed
Have the bone sawed in three or four pieces, and the marrow either taken out, or stopped with paste. Cover with cold water, and having skimmed it clean, add onions, carrot, celery, sweet herbs, and sp...
-353. Hare
Instead of roasting a hare, stew it; if young, plain - if an old one, lard it. The shoulders and legs should be taken off, and the back cut in three pieces; these, with a bay leaf, half a dozen eschal...
-354. Jugged Hare
Wash it very nicely, cut it up in pieces proper to help at. table, and put them into a jugging pot, or into a stone jar, just sufficiently large to hold it well; put in some sweet herbs, a roll or two...
-355. Slewed Rump Steaks
The steaks must be a little thicker than for broiling; let them all be the same thickness, or some will be done too little, and others too much. Put an ounce of butter into a stew-pan, with two onions...
-359. To Make An Excellent Ragout Of Cold Veal
Either a neck, loin, or fillet of veal will furnish this excellent ragout with a very little expense or trouble. Cut the veal into handsome cutlets; put a piece of butter, or clean dripping, into a fr...
-363. Slices Of Ham Or Bacon
Ham or bacon may be fried, or broiled on a gridiron over a clear fire, or toasted with a fork; take care to slice it of the same thickness in every part. If you wish it curled, cut it in slices about ...
-366. Ragout Of Duck, Or Any Other Kind Of Poultry Or Game
Partly roast, then divide into joints, or pieces of a suitable size for helping at table. Set it on in a stew-pan, with a pint and a half of broth, or, if you have no broth, water, with any little tri...
-Salting
367. There are many methods recommended for carrying this operation into effect. The following in our opinion are the best: - Before salting, particularly in the summer, all the kernels, pipes, and ...
-376. Hams
The modes of curing hams are various in different parts of the country, and by different people. We give the following: For three hams about twenty pounds each, take common salt and coarse sugar two p...
-Drying, Smoking, Etc
381. Drying may be effected by simply draining your salted or pickled meat, and hanging it within the warmth of a fire in a dry kitchen, but smoked dried meat is preferred by most persons, and cer ...
-Curing, Etc. With Pyroligneous Acid
385. Mr. Lockett, according to Dr. Wilkinson, in the Philosophical Magazine, 1821, was the first person who applied pyroligneous acid in the curing of meat. Mr. S. ascertained, that if a ham had the ...
-Keeping Fresh Meat
390. All kinds of meat should be hung till they are tender, but not till they are putrescent; or, at any rate, not a moment longer than when you can perceive a slight degree of putrescency in them. ...
-396. Brazilian Stew
Take shin or leg of beef; cut it into slices or pieces of two or three ounces each; dip it in good vinegar, and, with or without onions, or any other flavouring or vegetable substances, put it in a st...
-Cooking Vegetables
This branch of cookery, though apparently very simple, requires the utmost attention, and no little judgment. 398. You should always boil vegetables in soft water, if you can procure it; if not, put ...
-430. Kale, Sea And Scotch
This last kale is a favourite sort of greens for winter and spring; the heads should not be gathered before November. These will take a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes fast boiling; put them into...
-432. Mushrooms
The large flap mushrooms are excellent broiled. Have a very clear fire; make the bars of the gridiron very clean, and rub them with mutton suet to prevent them from sticking; a few minutes will broil ...
-434 Truffles
These are a very curious description of vegetables; they grow under ground, no part of the plants ever being seen on the surface. It is like the mushroom kind, a species of fungus, and is propagated b...
-Potatoes
437. In our directions for dressing vegetables, we speak lastly of potatoes - not because the cooking of this every-day food is of the least importance, but because, on the contrary, it is of the ...
-438. Potatoes To Boil
To boil, choose them all of a size, that they may be all done together; put them on with cold water, and a spoonful of salt, in a saucepan larger than they require, without the lid, and with not quite...
-Salads
446. Among the principal salad herbs we may reckon lettuce, of which the white cos in summer, and in winter the brown Dutch cos and brown cos, are the best; endive, of which the curled leaf is ...
-448. Basil Vinegar Or Wine
Sweet basil is in perfection about the middle of August; gather the fresh green leaves, quite free from stalk, and before it flowers; fill a wide-mouthed bottle with them, fill it with vinegar or wine...
-461. Mushroom Catsup
The juice of mushrooms approaches the nature and flavour of gravy meat more than other vegetable juices. Dr. Kitchiner sets a high value, and not without reason, upon good mushroom catsup, a couple o...
-467. To Clarify Dripping
Be careful that no cinders or ashes fall into the dripping-pan, and empty the well before the meat is salted or floured, as the dripping will be more valuable. The Nottingham ware are the best vessels...
-469. Hog's Lard
The inside fat or leaf of a pig should be beaten with a lard-beater, or rolling-pin; then put it into a jar or earthen pot, in a large kettle of boiling water, till it is melted; add a little salt and...
-Pickles
Like Dr. Kitchiner, we are not fond of pickles. They are, indeed, for the most part, mere vehicles for taking up vinegar and spice - and very unwholesome, indigestible vehicles they are. By pounding t...
-478. Garlic And Eschalots
Garlic and eschalots may be pickled in the same way as onions. 479. Melons, Mangoes, and long Cucumbers, may all be done in the same manner. Melons should not be much more than half grown; cucumbers ...
-481. Walnuts
Be particular in obtaining them exactly at the proper season; if they go beyond the middle of July, there is danger of their becoming hard and woody. Steep them a week in brine. If they are wanted to ...
-486. Mushrooms
Choose small white mushrooms; they should be but one night's growth. Cut off the roots, and rub the mushrooms clean with a bit of flannel and salt; put them in a jar, allowing to every quart of mushro...
-488. Indian Pickle
The vegetables to be employed for this favourite pickle, are small hard knots of white cabbage sliced, cauliflowers or brocoli in flakes, long carrots not larger than a finger, or large carrots sliced...
-Pastry
General Observations We are no friends to pastry, particularly what is called the rich flaky pastry. It is decidedly indigestible, and consequently unwholesome. A crisp, short paste, however, we cons...
-490. Raised Crust
Put two pounds and a half of flour on the paste-board, and put on the fire in a saucepan three-quarters of a pint of water, and half a pound of good lard; when the water boils, make a hole in the midd...
-501. Perigord Pie
Make a force meat chiefly of truffles, a small quantity of basil, thyme, parsley, knotted marjoram, the liver of any kind of game (if of woodcocks, that and the entrails, except the little bag), a sma...
-513. Calf's Head Pie
Stew a knuckle of veal till fit for eating, with two onions, a few isinglass shavings, a bunch of sweet herbs, a blade of mace, and a few peppercorns, in three pints of water. Keep the broth for the p...
-517. Chicken Pie
Take two young fowls, cut them up and season them with salt, a little mace, nutmeg, and white pepper very finely powdered; add a small bit of cayenne. Put the chickens, force meat balls, slices of ham...
-532. Venison Pasty
A boned and skinned shoulder makes a good pasty. It must be beaten and seasoned. Add the fat of a loin of mutton, well hung, as the shoulder is lean. Steep twenty-four hours in equal parts of vinegar ...
-Puddings, Cheesecakes, Etc
The first thing to be learnt, with regard to making puddings, is the composition of the batter. Without good batter, you cannot have good pudding; and without good eggs, flour, and milk, you cannot ha...
-552. Plum Pudding
To make a rich plum pudding take a pound of marrow, or suet, well chopped, a pound of fine flour dried, eight or ten eggs beaten well; half a nutmeg grated; as much mace, cinnamon, and ginger, all pow...
-566. Kitchiner's Pudding
Beat up three eggs, strain them through a sieve, and gradually add to them a quarter of a pint of new milk; stir them well together; rub together in a mortar two ounces of moist sugar, and as much nut...
-591. Newmarket Pudding
A pint of new milk, half a lemon rind, a little cinnamon, and a bay leaf; simmer a few minutes, sweeten with loaf-sugar, and strain by degrees to five well-beaten eggs (leaving out two whites;) pour t...
-611. Cheesecakes
The basis of cheesecakes is professedly the curd of milk as turned for cheese; but many are made entirely without it. The following recipe is much approved: Take the curd of eight quarts of new milk; ...
-622. Sally Lunn Tea Cake
Take a quarter of a pint of thick small-beer yeast, and one pint of warm milk, and put into a pan with flour sufficient to make it of a thick batter; let it stand by the fire till it has risen as high...
-629. Pumpkin And Squash Pie
The usual way of dressing pumpkins in England in a pie is to cut them into slices, mixed with apples, and bake them with a top crust like ordinary pies. A quite different process is pursued in America...
-Gruels, Creams, Syllabubs, Jellies, Etc, Etc
642. Common Flummery is merely water gruel flavoured, and eaten cold. Soak in cold water a pint of very fine white oatmeal; when it has steeped a day and a night, pour off the water quite clear. Then ...
-651. Cream For Fruit Pies
There are many ways of preparing cream. For fruit pies, simmer a pint of new milk, rind of Seville orange or lemon, cinnamon, either, or all, as you may choose. Whisk up the yolks of three eggs, with ...
-655. Calves' Feet Jelly
Take four calves' feet, not from the tripe shop, which have been boiled till almost all the gelatine is extracted, but buy them at the butcher's. Slit them in two, take away the fat from between the c...
-657. Arrow-Root
A dessert spoonful will thicken half a pint. It may be made with milk, and flavoured at pleasure, and according to circumstances, if for the sick. The method of mixing is, to moisten the arrow-root wi...
-670. Fruit Jelly
Put the fruit, carefully picked, into a stone jar; cover close; set it in a kettle of cold water, which reaches not more than three parts the height of the jar. Let it boil half an hour (more or less,...
-671. Jams
In making jam of very ripe juicy fruit, a portion of jelly may be taken from it which will improve the jam, taking care to have sufficient syrup to jelly round the fruit. Each quart of fruit and two p...
-682. To Preserve Ginger
If your ginger can be had green, it is best. Pare it nicely with a sharp knife, and throw it into cold water as you pare it, to preserve the whiteness. If fresh ginger cannot be procured, have the fin...
-684. Damson Cheese
It is sometimes made with the whole skins and pulp of the fruit, sometimes with the pulp only. In either case the fruit is first to be baked or boiled in a stone jar till it is tender, and the stones ...
-Directions For Carving
In preparing meat for the table, and in laying out the table, reference ought to be had to the carving department - a very onerous one to all, and to many a very disagreeable one. The carving knife of...
-686. Turbol, Etc
The trowel is to be carried flatways from the middle of the fish, and the carver should bring out as much meat as will lie upon it. The thick part is the best, and of course most esteemed. When one si...
-692. Aitch Bone Of Beef
Cut a slice an inch thick all through. Put this by, and serve in slices from the remainder. Some persons, however, like outside, and others take off a thinner slice before serving, for the sake of eco...
-700. A Leg Of Mutton, Etc
Begin to cut in the midway, between the knuckle and farther end. The slices should be thin and deep. If the outside is not fat enough, cut some from the fat on the broad end, in slices. Many prefer th...
-708. A Fowl
The legs of a boiled fowl are always bent inwards, and tucked into the belly, but before it is put upon the table, the skewers by which they are secured ought to be removed. The fowl should be laid on...
-713. Hare
Put the point of the knife under the shoulder, and cut all the way down to the rump, on the side of the back-bone. By doing the same on the other side, the hare will be divided into three parts. The b...
-Garnishes
Parsley is the most universal garnish to all kinds of cold meat, poultry, fish, butter, cheese, and so forth. Horse-radish is the garnish for roast beef, and for fish in general; for the latter, slice...
-Setting Out A Table
A prudent housekeeper, in providing for a family, or for company, will endeavour to secure variety, and avoid extravagance, taking care not to have two dishes alike, or nearly alike, such as ducks and...
-Made Wines, Etc - General Directions For Making
715. The best method of making these wines is to boil the ingredients, and ferment with yeast. Boiling makes the wine more soft and mellow. Some, however, mix the juice, or juice and fruit, with ...
-716. Ginger Wine
To make eighteen gallons of wine - twenty gallons of water, fifty pounds of loaf-sugar, two and a half pounds of bruised ginger, hops a quarter of a pound, the shaved rinds of eighteen lemons or Sevil...
-719. Malt Wine, Or English Sherry
For an eighteen-gallon cask allow fifty-six pounds of good moist sugar, and sixteen gallons of water; boil them together two hours, carefully skimming. When the scum is all removed, and the liquor loo...
-720. Orange Or Lemon Wine, Boiled
(For quantity of fruit, see No. 726.) To make eighteen gallons, twenty gallons of water, fifty-six pounds of loaf-sugar, the whites and shells of a dozen eggs, a quarter of a pound of hops; boil toget...
-722. Raisin Wine
There are various modes of preparing this wine, which is, perhaps, when well made, the best of our domestic wines. The following receipts are considered good: - For raisin wine, without sugar, put to ...
-726. Orange Or Lemon Wine Without Boiling
For an eighteen-gallon cask, half a chest of Seville oranges; they are most juicy in March. Shave the rinds of a dozen or two (more or less according as the bitter flavour is desired, or otherwise.) P...
-727. Cowslip Or Clary Wine
The best method of making these wines is to put in the pips dry, when the fermentation of the wine has subsided. This method is preferred for two reasons; first, it may be performed at any time of the...
-729. Elder Wine
The quantity of fruit required is one gallon of ripe elder-berries, and one quart of damsons or sloes, for every two gallons of wine to be produced; boil them in water till the damsons burst, frequent...
-733. Sherbet
In a quart of water boil six or eight sticks of rhubarb ten minutes: strain the boiling liquor on the thin shaved rind of a lemon. Two ounces of clarified sugar, with a wine-glassful of brandy, stir t...
-736. Pop, Or Ginger Beer
The principal difference between ginger pop and ginger beer, is, that the former is bottled immediately, the other is first put in a barrel for a few days. It is also usual to boil the ingredients for...
-737. Ginger Beer
The proportions of this may vary. Loaf-sugar is preferable to moist; some say a pound to a gallon, others a pound and a half; some allow but half an ounce of ginger (sliced or bruised) to a gallon, ot...
-Preface To The American Edition #2
Almost every foreigner who visits this country remarks with astonishment the almost universal neglect of that art upon which, more than any thing else, depends the health and comfort of a people; and ...
-Preface To The English Edition #2
Much as there has been written in Cookery Books on the art of Confectionary, there are few, very few works on the subject now extant which are practically written, and these are difficult to be obtain...
-Clarification Of Raw Sugar
For every six pounds of sugar required to be clarified, take one quart of water, the white of an egg, and about half a teacupful of bullock's blood. Less than a pint will be sufficient for 112 pounds;...
-To Clarify Loaf Sugar
This is clarified by mixing the whites of eggs with water, without any other assistance, for having been previously refined, it does not require those auxiliaries again to separate the coarser parts, ...
-Degrees Of Boiling Sugar
This is the principal point to which the confectioner has to direct his attention; for if he is not expert in this particular, all his other labour and knowledge will be useless: it is the foundation ...
-Crystallization
This takes the degrees of the blow and feather. The particles of the sugar being now brought together within the sphere of their activity, the attraction of cohesion commences, whereby they attach the...
-Candy
Sugar, after it has passed the degree of the feather, is of itself naturally inclined to grain, that is to candy, and will form a powder if agitated or stirred: for as the boiling is continued, so is ...
-Caramel
To obtain this degree it requires care and attention, and also to be frequently tried, as it passes speedily from the crack to the caramel. Try it as before directed, and let the water be quite cold, ...
-General Rules And Observations
Two things are essentially necessary to be observed, which are: - the proper methods of making decoctions and infusions. These require some knowledge of the nature and properties of vegetable matter. ...
-Infusions
These are watery solutions of vegetable matter, obtained by maceration, either in hot or cold water, with the assistance of ebullition. In selecting and conducting the operation the following general...
-Decoctions
These are solutions of the active principles of vegetables, obtained by boiling them in water. 1st. Those principles only should be decocted whose virtues 'reside in principles which are soluble i...
-Sirop De Capillaire. - Syrup Of Maidenhair
There are several sorts of Maidenhair, but the best is that of Canada, which has a pleasant smell joined to its pectoral qualities. The true Maidenhair - Capillus Veneris - is a native of Italy and of...
-Syrup Of Wormwood
There are three sorts of wormwood most generally known, - the common, sea, and Roman. The first may be distinguished by its broad leaves which are divided into roundish segments, of a dull green colou...
-Syrup Of Almonds - Strop De Orgeat
One pound of sweet almonds, four ounces of bitter ones, one pint and a half of water, sugar three pounds, orange-flower water two ounces. Blanch the almonds, and as they are blanched throw them into ...
-Crystallized Or Candied Sugar
Provide a round mould, smaller at the bottom than the top, of any size you may think proper, made either of tip or copper, with holes pierced round the sides about three inches asunder, so as to faste...
-Fruits To Crystallize
Have a square or round tin box, smaller at the bottom than the top, with wire gratings made to fit at convenient distances, and having a hole with a tube or pipe to admit a cork, and drain off the syr...
-Liqueur Rings, Drops, And Other Devices
These are all made after the same manner. A square box is necessary, which you fill with very dry starch powder. Sugar, powdered very fine and dried, will answer the same purpose. The depth of the box...
-Artificial Fruit, Eggs, Etc
Prepare moulds with plaster of Paris from the natural objects you wish to represent; make them in two, three, or more pieces, so as to relieve freely, and have a hole at one end into which the sugar m...
-Barley Sugar
Boil some clarified loaf sugar to the crack or caramel degree, using a little acid to prevent its graining: pour it out on a marble slab, which has been previously oiled or buttered. Four pieces of ir...
-Barley Sugar Tablets Or Kisses
Spread some sugar, as for the last; have a piece of wood about an inch and a half thick, with the surface divided into small squares, each being about an inch, and half an inch in depth; with this for...
-Acid Drops And Sticks
Boil clarified sugar to the crack, and pour it on an oiled marble stone: pound some tartaric or citric acid to a fine powder, and strew over it about a half or three quarters of an ounce of the former...
-To Extract The Acid From Candied Drops, Etc
All the articles which have acid mixed with them are extremely liable to grain, when they are useless for any purpose whatever, except, to .sell for broken pieces, as they cannot be boiled again unles...
-Raspberry Candy
This may either be made from raw or refined sugar. Boil it to the crack, and colour it with cochineal; pour it on a stone rubbed over with a little oil or butter, cut off a small piece, and keep it wa...
-Nogat
Two pounds of sweet almonds, one pound of sugar, one pound of water. Blanch the almonds, and cut them in slices, dry them at the mouth of a cool oven, and if slightly browned the better; powder the su...
-On Sugar-Spinning
To attain proficiency in this part, it requires much practice, and also a good taste for design, and to be expert in the boiling of sugar, taking particular care to avoid its graining. Baskets, temple...
-Chantilly Baskets
Prepare some ratafias, let them be rather small, and as near of a size as possible; boil some sugar to the caramel degree, rub over the inside of a mould slightly with oil, dip the edge of the ratafia...
-Cacao Nuts
The cocca or cacao nut, of which chocolate is made, is the seed of the fruit of a tree common in South America and the West Indies. The seeds of the nuts, which are nearly of the shape of an almond, a...
-The Making Of Chocolate
An iron pestle and mortar is requisite for this purpose, also a stone of the closest grain and texture which can be procured, and a rolling-pin made of the same material, or of iron. The stone must be...
-Chocolate Harlequin Pistachios
Warm some sweet chocolate by pounding it in a hot mortar; when it is reduced to a malleable paste, take a little of it and wrap round a blanched pistachio nut, roll it in the hand to form it as neat a...
-Pepper Mint Lozenges, No. 1
Take double-refined loaf sugar, pound and sift it through a lawn sieve; make a bay with the sugar on a marble slab, into which pour some dissolved gum, and mix it into a paste as you would dough, flav...
-Section VIII. - Pastile Drops
Choose the best treble-refined sugar with a good grain, pound it, and pass it through a coarse hair sieve; sift again in a lawn sieve to take out the finest part, as the sugar, when it is too fine, ma...
-Section IX. - Comfits
A COPPER comfit-pan is requisite for this purpose. A bar, having chains at each end, with a hook and swivel in the centre, is attached to it, by which it is suspended from the ceiling or a beam, so as...
-Scotch Caraway Comfits
Sift two pounds of seeds in a hair sieve to free them from dust, put them into the comfit-pan, and rub them well about the bottom with your hand until they are quite warm; have some clarified loaf sug...
-Cinnamon Comfits
Cinnamon is the bark of a tree, of which there are two sorts. The inferior quality is that usually sold for cinnamon, and is otherwise known as cassia, or cassia lignea. This breaks short, and has a s...
-Apple Jelly
Take either russet pippins, or any good baking apples; pare and core them, cut them in slices into a preserving pan containing sufficient water to cover them; then put them on the fire, and boil them ...
-Cherry Marmalade Or Jam
Take out the stones and stalks from some fine cherries and pulp them through a cane sieve; to every three pounds of pulp add half a pint of currant juice, and three-quarters of a pound of sugar to eac...
-Apple Or Pippin Paste
Take any quantity of good dressing apples, pare, core and put them into a preserving pan with a little water, or just sufficient to cover them. Boil until they are reduced to a marmalade, sirring them...
-Raspberry Cakes
Take ripe raspberries, press the juice from half of them, and put the pulp back with the others; reduce them on the fire. To each pound of pulp add two pounds of loaf sugar in powder; put it again on ...
-Clear Cakes, Or Jelly Cakes
Take the filtered juice of fruits, as for jelly (see Jellies); to each pint of juice add one pound of loaf sugar, dissolve it in the juice thoroughly, place it on the fire and heat it, but it must not...
-Pastes Formed With Gum - Pate De Guimauve - Marsh-Mallow Paste
Gum Arabic three pounds, roots of fresh marsh-mallows eight ounces, one dozen of rennet apples, loaf sugar three pounds. Peel, core, and cut the apples in pieces. Cleanse the roots, and slice them len...
-Gomme Des Jujubes -Jujube Gum
Jujubes one pound, very white and picked gum Arabic two pounds, powdered sugar two ounces. Pound the jujubes in a marble mortar with five pints of water, put the whole into a pan and boil until reduce...
-Wet Fruits
Most of the fruits are first prepared by being blanched, that is, boiled in water; they are then drained and put into boiling syrup, where they remain for a day. The syrup being now weakened with the ...
-Green Apricots, Wet
Get the apricots before the stone is formed in them, when they can be pierced through with a pin or needle; put them into a bag with plenty of salt, and shake them about in it to take off the down and...
-Ripe Apricots, Wet
Have the fruit not too ripe, make an incision in the side to take out the stone, or they may be cut in halves, and peeled or preserved with the skin on; have a preserving pan on the fire with water bo...
-Lemons Whole, Wet
Choose some fine large lemons with clear skins, carve the rind with a small penknife, into flowers, stars, diamonds, or any design your fancy may suggest, taking care not to cut deeper than the white ...
-Cherries, Wet Or Dry
Take the best Kentish or May Duke cherries; cut a quill as if you were going to make a pen, only, instead of its being sharp, it must be round at the end; hold the cherry in your left hand, and with t...
-Pears, Whole, Wet
Take some fine large pears, either eating or baking, but those for eating must not be too ripe; they are fit for this purpose when the pips are black. Throw them into a pan of water, with two ounces o...
-Ginger, Wet
This article is mostly imported from India and China, in jars or pots. Divide the largest races or roots from the smaller ones; lake largest for preserving, as the smaller ones will serve for planting...
-Section XV. - Brandy Fruits
All fruits may be preserved with brandy; but only the best sort of plums, such as apricots, magnum-bonums, peaches, green-gages, mirabelles, etc, with cherries and pears, are those usually done. The ...
-Section XVI. - On Bottled Fruits, Or Fruits Preserved Without Sugar
Choose wide-mouthed bottles, which are made for this purpose; let them be clean and perfectly dry; gather the fruit during dry weather, and fill the bottles if possible on the same day; shake the frui...
-Section XVIII. - Ices
[There is no article of the dessert kind that deserves a more elevated position than well-made ices, as well for their intrinsic merit as for the agreeable gout which they impart to a well-got-up ente...
-Utensils Requisite For Making
1st. Pewter pots of various sizes, suitable to the quantity of mixture intended to be frozen. Tin or zinc will not answer the purpose, as it congeals the mixture too quickly without allowing it a suff...
-To Freeze Ices
This is accomplished through the medium of ice. Of itself it does not contain sufficient frigorific power to congeal a liquid body to the required consistence without an auxiliary; the usual one emplo...
-Coffee Ice Cream
One quart of cream, five ounces of Mocha coffee, and twelve ounces of sugar; roast the coffee in a coarse iron or other stew-pan, keeping it constantly stirred until it is a good brown colour; throw i...
-Lemon-Water Ice
Haifa pint of lemon juice, half a pint of water, one pint of syrup, the peels of six lemons rubbed off on sugar, or the yellow rind may be pared or grated off, and the juice squeezed to it in a basin;...
-Section XX. - On Essences
The essences or essential oils sold for general use are or ought to be obtained by distillation; but for many purposes they may be obtained equally as good, and, in some cases, superior, without. As t...
-Dry Meringues In The Form Of Eggs
Ten whites of eggs, twelve ounces of sugar. Obtain the newest laid eggs, and separate the white from the yolk very carefully; put the whites into a pan, which must be quite free from grease; whisk th...
-Italian Meringues
One pound of sugar, the whites of six eggs. Clarify the sugar and boil it to the blow; in the mean time whip up the whites as for the last, take the sugar from the fire and rub it a little against the...
-Icing For Wedding Or Twelfth Cakes, Etc
Pound, and sift some treble-refined sugar through a lawn sieve, and put it into an earthen pan, which must be quite free from grease; to each pound of sifted sugar add the whites of three eggs, or suf...
-On Piping Cakes, Bon-Bons, Etc
This is a method of ornamenting wedding, twelfth-cakes, and other articles with icing, by means of small pipes or tubes; these are most generally made with writing-paper folded in the form of a cone, ...
-Section XXII. - Gum Taste
Take one ounce of picked gum-tragacanth; wash it in water, to take off any dust or dirt; put it into a clean pot, and pour on it rather more than half a pint of water, or sufficient to cover the gum a...
-Papier MâChéE
Take the cuttings of either white or brown paper, and boil them in water until reduced to a paste; press the water from it when cold enough, and pound it well in a mortar; put it into a pan or glazed ...
-On The Construction Of Assieites And Pieces MontéEs
To be a proficient in this part requires a general knowledge of the fine arts, particularly the principles of architecture; for without this, however well your piece may be finished with regard to wor...
-Of Pieces MontéEs
These are in general made to represent buildings of all descriptions, fountains, trophies, vases, cups, helmets, the last being generally mounted on pedestals and filled with flowers, fruit, etc.; als...
-Biscuit Paste To Imitate Marble Bucks, Etc, For Pieces MontéEs
Prepare some paste as for Savoy cakes (see p. 94); take one-third of the mixture, and add to it some dissolved chocolate; stir the whole well together, and divide into two equal portions; to one part ...
-Pate D'Office, Or Confectioners' Paste
Take one pound and a quarter of fine flour, and ten ounces of loaf sugar sifted through a fine sieve; make a bay, and put in it a sufficient quantity of the yolks or whites of eggs, or whole eggs, to ...
-On Modelling
This art is most important to the confectioner. It is not so difficult to accomplish as is generally supposed; it only requires patience and perseverance, with a close attention to the proportions and...
-Modelling Tools
No. 1 is termed the rose-stick, the thin flat end being used for forming the leaves of roses out of modelling wax by flattening a piece of it on a table until it is of the required form and size; the ...
-Section XXII. - On Colours
Many of the colours prepared for use in this art come more properly under the denomination of dyes, alum and cream of tartar being used as a mordant; and many of them are prepared in the same manner a...
-Carmine
Reduce one ounce of cochineal to a fine powder, add to it six quarts of clear rain or filtered water, as for cochineal. Put this into a large tin saucepan, or a copper one tinned, and let it boil for ...
-Section XXIII. - Distillation
This art is of great importance to a confectioner, as it enables him to make his own oils, waters, and spirits for liqueurs and ratafias, instead of purchasing at a high rate those vile adulterations ...
-On Essential Oils
To obtain these from plants or peels, the articles should be infused for two or three days, or even longer, in a sufficient quantity of cold water, until it has fully penetrated the pores of the mater...
-Distilled Waters
These are obtained in a similar manner to the oils, with a high narrow-necked still, and differ from them by the oil being retained or united with the water. Plants for this purpose should be gathered...
-Spirits For Liqueurs
Spirits and alcohol are obtained by the distillation of fermented articles. The peculiar taste of each depends on the essential oil of the article from which it is prepared being held in solution: the...
-Distilled Spirituous Waters Fur Liqueurs
Orange, rose, pink, jessamine, and all other flowers, are made by adding eight pounds of the leaves or petals of the flowers to a gallon of pure proof spirit. Put them in a cold cellar or ice-house to...
-Maraschino De Zara
Morello cherries nine pounds, black wild cherries seven pounds, or sixteen pounds of Morello cherries,* one pint and a-quarter of Kirchenwasser, spirit of roses one ounce and a-half, spirit of orange ...
-Section XXV. - The Stove Or Hot Closet
This is a useful and indispensable appendage in confectionary; it is generally constructed like a cupboard in the recess of a wall. The walls or sides should be composed of bricks, or wood lined with ...
-The Pastry-Cook. Introduction
We now come to a very important, because a very difficult, branch of the art of baking, whether exercised as a profession, or by private individuals, namely the manufacturing of what are technically c...
-Cakes
Rich pound-cake; twelfth, or bride-cakes: butter two pounds twelve ounces, sugar one pound twelve ounces, currants five pounds, citron one pound and a-half, almonds six ounces, nutmegs, mace, and cinn...
-Savoy Cakes (Hot Mixture)
One pound of loaf sugar powdered, one pint of good eggs, and fourteen ounces of flour. Warm a pan, free from grease, with the sugar in it in the oven until you can scarcely bear your hand against it; ...
-Cold Mixtures
Separate the yolks from the whites when you break the eggs. Put the yolks into a clean pan with the sugar, and the whites in another by themselves. Let the pans be quite free from grease. If they are ...
-Venice Cake
Take a Savoy cake and cut it in slices, half or three-quarters of an inch thick, in a parallel direction from the bottom to the top; spread over each slice with raspberry or apricot jam, or some of ea...
-Bride
Wash and pick one pound and a half of currants very clean; dry them in a cloth - stone four ounces of Muscatel raisins - add a quarter of an ounce of mace, and half as much cinnamon; pound it fine in ...
-Banbury
Take one pound and a half of flour, and one pound of butter; roll your butter and part of the flour out in sheets; wet up the rest of your flour with one or two table-spoonsful of good yeast, and abou...
-Lunch, Or School
Rub half a pound of moist sugar into two pounds of flour; make a hole in the middle of it, and put in a table-spoonful of good thick yeast (not bitter); warm half a pint of milk rather more than blood...
-Pound
Take one pound of butter, beat it with your hand in a warm pan till it comes to a fine cream; put in one pound of powdered loaf sugar - beat it together to a nice cream. Previously, have one pound and...
-Lady Fingers
Put the yolks of four eggs in a small basin with four ounces of pounded sugar, on which you have grated the peel of one good fresh lemon; work this well with a spatula for five minutes; after which, b...
-Rusks
Rub six ounces of butter into four pounds of flour; set a sponge with a pint and a-half of warm milk, and a half pint of yeast; when the sponge rises, add four ounces of good moist sugar, mix it up to...
-Of Pastes In General - Preliminary Remarks
[The first grand object for our consideration is the proper method of making paste; for upon our skill in that important branch of the pastry-cook's art, will the success of our future operations main...
-Manner Of Working
Having placed the twelve ounces of flour on the board, make a small hole in the middle; in which, put the two drachms of salt, the yolks of two eggs, and nearly a glass of water; and with the ends of ...
-Puff Paste
Take one pound of flour, and one pound of good firm butter; cut your butter into slices; roll it in thin sheets on some of your flour; wet up the rest with about a quarter of a pint of water; see that...
-Mince Pies
Stew three pounds of lean beef till it is tender; chop it fine with one pound and a half of beef suet, one dozen of apples, and one pound of stoned raisins; mix all together, with three pounds of curr...
-The Baker. Introduction
Baking, or the art of making bread, is amongst the earliest modes resorted to by the more advanced portions of mankind for the preparation of food. In the early ages, however, loaf or leavened bread w...
-General Remarks On Baking
Baking, as a business or profession, was never confined to the baking of common bread alone, that is to say, bread in every-day use. A baker we take to mean a person who bakes and prepares any farinac...
-Family Or Home-Baked Bread
An expeditious and simple method of making bread for a small family is as follows: - Take half a bushel of flour; put all this flour excepting about four pounds into a tub or pan, and in winter place ...
-Bread Not Liable Io Become Bitter
This process is an invention of a Mr. Stone. He took a tea-spoonful of yeast and mixed it with three quarters of a pint of warm water. He then took a bushel or fifty-six pounds of flour, and having pu...
-Yeast To Preserve
Take a quantity and work it well with a whisk, till it becomes thin; then procure a wooden dish or platter, clean and dry, and with a soft brush lay a thin layer of yeast on the dish, and turn the top...
-Artifcial Yeast
Take two ounces of flour, boil it in a quart of water, till it comes to the consistence of a thin jelly, pour it into a machine for impregnating water with fixed air; then put into the lower vessel so...
-Alum Potatoes, etc
These ingredients are now considered indispensable by the London bakers in the manufacturing of second or household bread, that is, the bread in daily use in the metropolis. The effects of alum upon b...
-Alum Potatoes, etc. Continued
Formerly every baker was his own mealman or miller. This is he case now in Glasgow, and in other parts of Scotland. The bakers buy their own wheat, and manufacture it into flour at their own mills, wh...
-The Old Method
To make a sack of flour into bread, the baker bakes that quantity of flour, and empties it into the kneading trough - it is then carefully sifted through a wire sieve, which makes it lie lighter and r...
-Modern Method
Take a peck of potatoes (about eight pounds) and boil them with their skins on - then mash them in the seasoning tub, add two or three quarts of water, about the same quantity of patent yeast (as dire...
-Substitute For Wheat-Flour Bread
Under this head we intend to treat of the various substitutes which have been used at different times, and in different countries, for bread made of wheat flour. We allude to bread made of rye, barley...
-Bread Made Of Roots
M. Parmentier, late chief Apothecary in the Hotel des Invalides, whose authority we have before quoted, has published numerous and very curious experiments on the vegetables, which in times of scarcit...
-Ragwort
Bread has been made in times of scarcity from the roots of this plant. When ragwort root is first taken out of the ground, it is soft and viscous, but becomes hard in a short time, and may be preserve...
-Debreizen Bread
In some parts of Hungary, Debretzen for instance, they have a peculiar mode of fermenting bread without yeast, by means of a leaven made in the following manner. Two large handsful of hops are boiled ...
-Bean Flour Bread
Take a quarter of a peck of bean flour and one ounce of salt; mix it into a thick batter with water - pour a sufficient quantity of this batter to make a cake in an iron kettle; and bake over the fire...
-Oatmeal And Pease Bread
To a peck of pease flour, and a like quantity of oatmeal, previously well mixed, by passing the two flours through a sieve, add three or four ounces of salt; knead into a stiff mass with warm water; r...
-The Bread Tree
Various substances have been employed in different parts of the world as substitutes for making bread, in the absence of farinaceous or flour-yielding vegetables. The bread tree, or rather the fruit o...
-Bread Fruit Bread
To prepare the fruit for use instead of bread, it must be roasted, either whole, or cut into three or four pieces. It is also cooked in an oven, which renders it soft, and something like a boiled pota...
-Rules And Maxims Of The Kitchen - Summary Of Directions
Rules And Maxims Of The Kitchen In our foregoing remarks we have endeavoured to explain the leading principles upon which the art of cookery is founded - principles with which the young cook should b...
-32. Game - 69. Fish Broth
32. Game Hares, partridges and pheasants from September through the winter: the game season closes with February. All kinds of water-fowl are most plentiful in keen, dry weather, especially w cold we...
-70. Cock-A-Leeky Soup - 77. Mutton Broth
70. Cock-A-Leeky Soup Take a small knuckle of veal, and a large fowl, or a scrag of mutton instead of veal. An old fowl will do. Add three or four large leeks, cut in pieces of half an inch long. Sim...
-78. Mutton Chop Broth - 88. Curry Or Mulligatawny Soup
78. Mutton Chop Broth Cut the chops from a neck or loin of mutton; cut as much as is required into thin chops; put them in a stew-pan, with an onion or two, a little salt, and cold water enough to co...
-91. Game Soup - 98. Irish Stew
91. Game Soup In the game season it is easy to make very good soup at a little expense, by taking all the meat off the breasts of any cold birds that have been left on the preceding day, and pound it...
-106. Gravy For Roast Veal - 115. Onion Sauce
106. Gravy For Roast Veal Make in the same way as for any other roast meat, and make a tea-cup full of thick melted butter, or melt the butter in the gravy. The same gravy for target or loin of lamb....
-116. Apple Sauce - 125. Mock Caper Sauce
116. Apple Sauce Take four or five juicy apples, two table-spoonfuls of cold water or cider; instead of putting the lid on, place the parings over the apples, and put them by a gentle fire. When they...
-126. Shrimp Sauce - 135. Poor Man's Sauce
126. Shrimp Sauce Shell a pint of shrimps, and stir into half a pint of melted butter; a little cream makes a delicate addition. It is used with salmon, turbot, and soles. 127. Oyster Sauce Two doz...
-136. Truffle Sauce - 143. Pudding Sauce
136. Truffle Sauce Truffles are only good while in season, that is, in a green state. Add two ounces of butter to eighteen truffles sliced, simmer them together till they are tender; then add as much...
-144. Custard Sauce - 173. Sheeps' Heads,Plain Boiled
144. Custard Sauce For rice or other plain puddings, or with fruit pies, stir a pint of sweet cream in a double saucepan till it boils; beat the yolks of two or three eggs, with a spoonful of cold cr...
-174. Leg Of Lamb, Boiled - 188. Broiled Salmon
174. Leg Of Lamb, Boiled From an hour and a quarter to an hour and a half. Accompaniments - caper sauce, melted butter, turnips, spinach, carrots, etc. 175. Neck, Boiled One hour; if very large, an...
-189. Baked Salmon - 194. Soles Or Eels, Stewed
189. Baked Salmon If a small fish, turn the tail to the mouth, and skewer it; force meat may be put in the belly, or, if part of a large fish is to be baked, cut it in slices, egg it over, and dip ...
-199. Sturgeon - 206. Smelts, Gudgeons, Sprats, Or Other Small Fish, Fried
199. Sturgeon If for boiling take off the skin, which is very rich and oily; cut in slices; season with pepper and salt; broil over a clear fire; rub over each slice a bit of butter, and serve with ...
-208. Stewed Trout - 215. Perch, Boiled
208. Stewed Trout When the fish has been properly washed, lay it in a stew-pan, with half a pint of claret or port wine, and a quart of good gravy; a large onion, a dozen berries of black pepper, ...
-218. Oysters Au Gratin - 235. Mock Hare
218. Oysters Au Gratin Take the best oysters you can find, and dry them on a napkin; you then place them on a silver shell, made expressly for the purpose, or fine, large, deep oyster shells, if ...
-236. Ribs Of Beef Boned - 251. Canvass Back Ducks, Or Red Neck Ducks
236. Ribs Of Beef Boned Take out the ribs, etc. and roll it as round as possible; bind with tape; roast with or without veal stuffing, laid over before rolling. Thoroughly soak it, and brown it ...
-252. Duck - 266. Seasoning For A Sucking Pig
252. Duck Mind your duck is well cleaned, and wiped out with a clean cloth; for the stuffng, take an ounce of onion and half an ounce of green sage; clup them very fine, and mix them with two ounces ...
-267. Seasoning For A Goose - 273. Veal Force Meat
267. Seasoning For A Goose Scald the liver, chop fine, crumb twice its weight in bread, chop fine four small onions, or an equal weight of chives, half the weight of green sage, half an ounce of ...
-275. Stuffing For Heart And Many Other Purposes - 280. Egg Balls
275. Stuffing For Heart And Many Other Purposes Take half a pound of grated bread; chop fine a quarter of a pound of beef or lamb suet or beef marrow; season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg; a handful ...
-281. Brain Balls - 314. A Fowl Or Rabbit
281. Brain Balls Take a calf's brains, or two or throe lambs', scald them for ten minutes, quite free from every bit of vein and skin, beat up with seasoning the same as egg balls, adding a tea ...
-315. Pigeons - 332. Preserved Orange And Lemon Peels
315. Pigeons Clean them well, and pepper and salt them; broil them over a clear slow fire; turn them often, and put a little butter on them; when they are done, pour over them either stewed or ...
-333. Essences, Or Tinctures Of Herbs, Etc - 338. Tincture Of Lemon Or Seville Orange Peel
333. Essences, Or Tinctures Of Herbs, Etc Combine their essential oils with good tasteless spirits (which is better than brandy, and much cheaper) in the proportion of one drachm of essential oil to ...
-339. Spirits Of Mixed Spice - 345. Mr. Phillips's Irish Stew
339. Spirits Of Mixed Spice Black pepper one ounce, allspice half an ounce, both finely powdered; nutmeg quarter of an ounce, grated; infuse in a pint of spirits of wine, strain, and bottle. Made ...
-346. Mutton Chops Delicately Stewed, And Good Mutton Broth - 357. Bubble And Squeak
346. Mutton Chops Delicately Stewed, And Good Mutton Broth Put the chops into a stew-pan with cold water enough to cover them, and an onion; when it is coming to the boil, skim it, cover the pan ...
-358. Hashed Or Minced Veal - 365. Marrow Bones
358. Hashed Or Minced Veal To make a hash, cut the meat into into slices: to prepare minced veal, mince it as fine as possible (do not chop it); put it into a stew-pan with a few spoonfuls of veal ...
-Artificial Preparations Of Meat, Fish. Etc, For Dressing, Salting, Drying, Etc - 410. Cauliflowers
Artificial Preparations Of Meat, Fish. Etc, For Dressing, Salting, Drying, Etc By the phrase artificial preparations of meat, we allude to those things which, before dressing, have to undergo the p...
-411. Brocoli - 416. Vegetable Marrow Or Gourd
411. Brocoli Choose close firm heads, nearly of a size. Put them into boiling water with salt; allow them plenty of room in boiling, or they will break; and boil them fast, or they will lose their ...
-417. Turnips - 422. French Or Kidney Beans
417. Turnips Put them into boiling water, with a little salt; when tender, take them up and drain the water from them; they will take from half an hour to an hour boiling. If for mashing, boil them ...
-424. Jerusalem Artichokes - 436. Parsnips
424. Jerusalem Artichokes Scrub them clean, and put them into the pot with cold water; throw in a handful of salt, do not let them be covered with water, and leave off the lid; they take about the ...
-450. Cress Or Celery Vinegar - 458. Walnut Catsup
450. Cress Or Celery Vinegar Pour over a quart of the best vinegar to an ounce of celery or cress seeds, when dried and pounded; let them steep ten days, shake it every day, then strain and bottle ...
-459. Oyster Catsup - 477. Red Cabbage
459. Oyster Catsup Take fine large fresh oysters, open them carefully, and wash them in their own liquor, to take any particle of shell that may remain, strain the liquor after. Pound the oysters in ...
-480. Brocoli Or Cauliflowers - 489. Flaky And Short Crusts
480. Brocoli Or Cauliflowers Choose such as are firm, yet of their full size; cut away all the leaves, and pare the stalk; pull away the flowers by bunches, steep in brine two days, then drain them; ...
-491. Puff Paste - 500. Icing Pastry
491. Puff Paste This paste is nearly the same as what we have called (489) flaky crust, and, of course, made upon the same principles. If eggs are desired, allow three yolks to a pound of butter or ...
-502. Sole Pie - 509. Veal, Chicken And Parsley Pie
502. Sole Pie Split the soles from the bone, and cut the fins close; season with a mixture of salt, pepper, a little nutmeg, and pounded mace, and put them in layers with oysters. They eat ...
-510. Veal Olive Pie - 515. Lamb Pie
510. Veal Olive Pie Make the olives in the following manner; Cut long thin slices of veal, beat them, lay on them thin slices of fat bacon, and over them a layer of force meat, seasoned high with ...
-516. Mutton Pie - 525. Pigeon Pie
516. Mutton Pie Take steaks from the loin or neck of mutton that has been kept some time hanging; beat them and cut off some of the fat; add pepper, salt, and a small onion; put a little water at ...
-526. Squab Pie - 533. To Make A Pasty Of Beef Or Mutton, To Eat As Well As Venison
526. Squab Pie Cut apples, and lay them in rows, with mutton chops, a little sugar, and an onion; cut fine, and put among them. 527. Duck Pie Bone a fowl and a full-grown duck; wash them, season ...
-534. Apple Pie - 541. Lemon Tart
534. Apple Pie Wipe the outside of some apples, pare, and core them; boil the parings and cores in a little water till it tastes well; strain, and put a bit of bruised lemon, a little sugar and ...
-542. Orange Tartlets Or Puffs - 549. Excellent Light Puffs
542. Orange Tartlets Or Puffs Line patty-pans; when baked, put in orange marmalade made with apple jelly: 543. Fried Patties Mince a bit of cold veal and six oysters with a few crumbs of bread, ...
-550. Cheese Puffs - 557. Potatoe Pudding
550. Cheese Puffs Strain cheese curd from the whey, and beat half a pint of it fine in a mortar, with three eggs, a spoonful and a half of flour, only one white of the eggs, a quarter of a nutmeg, ...
-558. Cottage Potatoe Pudding - 565. Almond Pudding
558. Cottage Potatoe Pudding Two pounds of mashed potatoes rubbed through a colander, two or three eggs well beaten, two ounces of moist sugar, three-quarters of a pint of milk, a little nutmeg and ...
-567. A Dutch Rice Pudding - 571. Ground Rice Pudding
567. A Dutch Rice Pudding Soak four ounces of rice in warm water half an hour, then drain the water from it, and throw the rice into a stew-pan, with half a pint of milk, half a stick of cinnamon, ...
-572. Rice Snow Balls - 578. Hunter's Pudding
572. Rice Snow Balls Pick and wash half a pound of the best rice, boil it in water for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, drain it quite dry; there should be more water than the rice will take up: ...
-579. Marlborough Pudding - 586. The Conservative Pudding
579. Marlborough Pudding Cover the dish with a thin puff paste; then take candied cition, orange, and lemon peel, each one ounce; slice these sweetmeats very thin, and lay them all over the bottom ...
-587. Economical Pudding - 595. Mother Eve's Pudding
587. Economical Pudding In families where there are loose pieces of bread, they can be made into a pudding instead of throwing them on one side. Boil as much milk as the size of your dish will ...
-596. Newcastle Pudding - 603. French And Italian Puddings
596. Newcastle Pudding Butter half a melon mould, or quart basin, and stick all round with dried cherries, or fine raisins, fill up with bread and butter - and steam it half an hour. 597. Hasty ...
-604. A Cheese Pudding - 610. To Make Curd For Cheesecakes, And Other Purposes
604. A Cheese Pudding Half a pound of cheese grated, butter two ounces, four eggs, a little cayenne and nutmeg. Butter a dish, and bake twenty minutes. 605. A Very Rich Pudding Of Prime Ripe Fruit ...
-612. Polatoe Cheesecakes - 620. Potatoe Fritters
612. Polatoe Cheesecakes Take half a pound of mashed potatoes, rubbed through a colander, or a quarter of a pound of mucilage, or potatoe starch; mix with a quarter of a pound of butter, a tea-cup ...
-621. Bread - 626. Green Indian Corn
621. Bread Put a quartern of flour into a large basin, or small pan, with two tea-spoonfuls of salt; make a hole in the middle, then out in a basin four table-spoonfuls of good yeast, stir in a pint ...
-627. Indian Corn, Or Maize Pudding, Baked - 636. American Souse
627. Indian Corn, Or Maize Pudding, Baked Scald a quart of milk (skimmed milk will do,) and stir in seven table-spoonfuls of sifted Indian meal, a tea-spoonful of salt, a tea-cup full of molasses or ...
-037. American Dry Bread - 646. Blancmange
037. American Dry Bread As far as possible, have bits of bread eaten up before they become hard. Spread those that are not eaten, and let them dry, to be pounded for puddings, or soaked for brewis. B...
-647. A Richer Blancmange - 652. Birch's Receipt For Mock Cream
647. A Richer Blancmange Simmer an ounce or little more of fine isinglass in a pint and a half of new milk; add the rind of half a lemon, shred very fine a blade or two of mace, a stick of cinnamon, ...
-653. Trifle - 661. Barley Gruel
653. Trifle Mix in a large bowl a quarter of a pound of sifted sugar, a bit of lemon peel grated fine, and the juice of a whole lemon, half a gill of Lisbon or sweet wine, the same of brandy, and a ...
-663. Barley Water - 669. Orange Marmalade
663. Barley Water Scotch or pearl barley may be used. Wash, or boil up, as tor barley gruel; to a quart of water, barley two ounces. Simmer till of an agreeable thickness, and strain. Boil the ...
-672. Cherries - 678. A Very Nice Preserve Of Apricots
672. Cherries To preserve cherries without boiling, take fine ripe Morello cherries; cut the stalks an inch from the fruit, and put them into wide-mouthed bottles; when full, put powdered loaf-sugar ...
-679. Dried Apricots - 702. Shoulder Of Mutton
679. Dried Apricots Proceed as above, but instead of pouring the syrup over them after the last boil, drain them close, strew over sifted sugar to cover them, and dry them on a wire sieve on a stove,...
-703. Haunch Of Venison Or Mutton - 710. Partridges And Pigeons
703. Haunch Of Venison Or Mutton Cut down to the bone in circular slices at the narrow end, to let out the gravy. You may then turn the broad end of the haunch towards you; insert the knife in the ...
-711. Goose Or Duck - 721. Grape Wine
711. Goose Or Duck Cut off the apron of the goose and pour into the body a large spoonful of gravy, which should be mixed with the stuffing. Some persons put, instead of the gravy, a glass of port ...
-723. Raisin Wine With Sugar - 731. Cherry Brandy
723. Raisin Wine With Sugar To every gallon of soft water four pounds of fresh raisins: put them in a large tub; stir frequently, and keep it covered with a sack or blanket. In about a fortnight the ...
-732. Raspberry Brandy - To Ascertain The Degree Of The Blow
732. Raspberry Brandy Scald the fruit in a stone jar set in a kettle of water, or on a hot hearth. When the juice will run freely, strain it without pressing: to every quart of juice allow one pound ...
-The Feather - Raspberry Vinegar Syrup
The Feather Dip the skimmer again into the sugar, and blow through the holes as before, and the bubbles will appear larger and stronger. Or if you give the skimmer a sudden jerk, so as to throw the s...
-[Strawberry Syrup - Syrup Of Violets
[Strawberry Syrup Make as pine-apple; taking care to strain carefully at least twice, through a tine flannel bag, so as to remove entirely ail sediment, and the small seed of the fruit.] Currant Syr...
-Syrup Of Pinks - [Another. - A Better Flavoured And A Richer Ginger Syrup Is Made In The Following Manner
Syrup Of Pinks Clove pinks, one pound eight ounces, water two pints and a half, sugar, three pounds. Let the flowers he fresh gathered, cut off the white points of the petals and weigh them. Finish a...
-Syrup Of Coffee - Coltsfoot Or Horehound Candy
Syrup Of Coffee Fresh roasted Mocha coffee two pounds, water one quart, sugar three pounds eight ounces. Grind the coffee in mill, and make a cold infusion with the water in a close vessel; let it st...
-Burnt Almonds - Barley Sugar Drops
Burnt Almonds Take some fine Valencia or Jordan almonds, and sift all the dust from them; put a pint of clarified syrup into the pan for each pound of almonds, and place it with the almonds on the fi...
-Clove, Ginger, Or Peppermint Candy - To Make A Silver Web
Clove, Ginger, Or Peppermint Candy These are all made in the same way as raspberry, using the essential oil of each for flavour. For clove, the mixture, whilst boiling, is coloured with cochineal; gi...
-To Make A Gold Web - Vanilla Chocolate
To Make A Gold Web Boil syrup to caramel height, colouring it with saffron, and form it as directed for the last. It can be folded up to form bands or rings, etc. Fasten it to the other decorations w...
-Cinnamon, Mace Or Clove Chocolate - Rose Lozenges
Cinnamon, Mace Or Clove Chocolate These are made in the same manner as the last, using about an ounce and a half or two ounces of either sort of spice, in powder, to that quantity, or add a sufficien...
-Cinnamon Lozenges - Marshmallow Lozenges
Cinnamon Lozenges Gum tragacanth, dissolved, two ounces, lawned sugar eight pounds, cinnamon in powder one ounce, essential oil ten drops. Mix into a paste, and colour with bole ammoniac. A stomachi...
-Vanilla Lozenges - Peppermint Or Other Pipes
Vanilla Lozenges Sugar four pounds, vanilla in powder, six ounces, or sufficient to give a strong flavour. Make into a paste with dissolved gum. Catechu Lozenges Sugar four pounds, catechu twelve o...
-Brilliants - Rose Drops
Brilliants Take either of the pastes for peppermint lozenges from No. 1 to 4, and cut it into small fancy devices, such as hearts, diamonds, spades, triangles, squares, etc. Refined Liquorice Four ...
-Peppermint Drops - Almond Comfifs
Peppermint Drops Moisten the sugar with peppermint water, or flavour it with the essence of peppermint, and moisten it with water. Orange-Flower Drops Use orange-flower water to moisten the sugar, ...
-Cardamom Comfits - Comfits In Gum Paste
Cardamom Comfits The seeds should be kept in their husks until they are required to be used, as they lose much of their flavour and virtues when deprived of them. They are often mixed with grains of ...
-Ginger Comfits - Barberry Jelly
Ginger Comfits Flavour gum paste with powdered ginger, make it into small balls about the size of coriander seeds, or peas; dry, and proceed as for Scotch caraways.' Colour them yellow when finished....
-Raspberry Jelly - Apple Cheese
Raspberry Jelly Take one and a half gallons of ripe raspberries and a half gallon of ripe currants, press out the juice and filter it; to a pint of juice add one pound of loaf sugar, and finish as ot...
-Apricot Paste - Plum Paste
Apricot Paste Take ripe apricots, put them in a preserving pan with as much water as will cover them; let them simmer on the fire for two or three minutes, or scald until they are tender; drain the w...
-Damson Cheese - Pate Des Jujubes - Jujube Paste
Damson Cheese Pick the stalks from the damsons, put them in a jar, tie it over, and bake in a cool oven; when done, pass them through a sieve into a preserving pan; put it on the fire to reduce. For...
-Pate De Gomme Senegal - Senegal Paste - Ripe Peaches, Whole, Wet
Pate De Gomme Senegal - Senegal Paste Gum Senegal two pounds, sugar one pound. Dissolve the gum in orange-flower water and common water; or dissolve it in common water, and flavour with essence of ne...
-Ripe Nectarines, Wet - Green Gooseberries In The Form Of Hops, Wet
Ripe Nectarines, Wet Preserve as peaches. Figs, Wet Get the figs nearly ripe, prick them four or five times with the point of a knife, throw them into cold water, put them on the fire and boil unti...
-Cucumbers Or Gherkins, Wet - Orange Or Lemon Chips
Cucumbers Or Gherkins, Wet Let them be clear, free from all spots, and of a good green; prick them all over with a fork, throw them into a pan of water mixed with a handful of salt, let them lie in t...
-Angelica, Wet - Grapes In Bunches
Angelica, Wet Cut some stalks of fine tender angelica into pieces about six inches long, or any other suitable length. Put them into a pan of water on the fire until they are soft, then put them into...
-Currants In Bunches, Wet - Candied Fruit
Currants In Bunches, Wet Take the finest currants you can get, either red or white; stone them with a pin or the nib of a pen, taking care not to cut them more than is necessary; tie six or eight bun...
-Dried Fruit - Apple Compote
Dried Fruit Any of those fruits which are preserved with syrup may be dried: they are also better when fresh dried. Warm the fruit in the syrup; take it out and drain; spread it on sieves or wires; p...
-Grape Compote - Lemonade
Grape Compote Pick and stone some fine ripe grapes; put them in boiling syrup at the large pearl; give them three or four boils in it; let them cool, take off the scum, and serve. Currant Compote T...
-Cream Ices - Ginger Ice
Cream Ices These are composed entirely of pure fresh cream, with the juice or pulp of fruit either fresh or preserved, and syrup or sugar so blended together as the taste of one may not predominate o...
-[Brahma Ice - Custard For Ices
[Brahma Ice One quart of cream, the whites of ten eggs, one and a half pounds of powdered sugar of the best quality; mix the whole in a tin saucepan; put it on the fire, stirring constantly, until it...
-Plombiere Ice, Or Swiss Pudding - Chocolate Ice
Plombiere Ice, Or Swiss Pudding Take one pint and a half of cream and half a pint of milk, and make them into a custard with seven yolks of eggs; flavour it either with Curaçjoa, Maraschino, or rum; ...
-Tea Ice - Raspberry Water Ice
Tea Ice One quart of cream, two ounces of the best green tea, and twelve ounces of sugar; put the tea into a cup, and pour on it a little cold river water in which has been dissolved a small portion ...
-Raspberry Water Ice - Punch-Water Ice
Raspberry Water Ice Two pottles of the best scarlet pines, one pint of syrup, half a pint of water, and the juice of two lemons. Mix as currant. All red fruits require the addition of a little prepa...
-Punch A La Romaine - Roman Punch Ice - N. B
Punch A La Romaine - Roman Punch Ice Make a quart of lemon ice, and flavour it with a glass or two of each, of rum, brandy, champagne, and Maraschino; when it is frozen, to each quart take the whites...
-Pine Apple Jelly - Allspice, Cloves, Cinnamon, Or Nutmegs, Etc
Pine Apple Jelly Take a fine ripe pine apple, cut it small, and strain the juice through a hair sieve, then throw it into the boiling syrup, let it boil up, and when nearly cold strain it through a s...
-Essence Of Ginger - Gum Paste Fur Ornaments
Essence Of Ginger The best Jamaica or China ginger two ources, proof spirit one pint. Powder the ginger, mix it with the spirit, stop close, and let it steep for twelve or fourteen days. This is the...
-Paste Fur Gilding An - Yellow
Paste Fur Gilding An Take some dissolved gum, as before, and make it into a paste with a little starch-powder to finish it; or it may be made with some of the prepared sugar gum-paste, finishing it w...
-Sap Green - Cinnamon Wa,Er
Sap Green This is prepared from the fruit of the buckthorn, and is purgative. Spinach Green This is perfectly harmless and will answer most purposes. Wash and drain a sufficient quantity of spinach...
-Peppermint Water - The English Method
Peppermint Water Dried herb one pound and a half, or green herb three pounds, to a gallon of water. Lemon-Peel Water Two pounds of fresh peel to the gallon. Black-Cherry Water Twelve pounds of ri...
-Spirit Of Coffee - Ratafia Of Cherries
Spirit Of Coffee One pound of the best Mocha coffee, fresh roasted and ground, add to it one gallon of rectified proof spirit, let it infuse for a week, and distil in the bain-marie. Spirit Of Bitte...
-Ratafia Des Cassis - Blanched Almonds
Ratafia Des Cassis Ripe black currants six pounds, cloves half a drachm, cinnamon one drachm, black currant leaves one pound and a half, Morello cherries two pounds, sugar five pounds, proof spirit e...
-Icing For A Cake - Drop
Icing For A Cake Take one pound of double-refined sugar, pound it fine, and sift it through a lawn sieve; then beat the whites of three eggs in a very clean pan, with a whisk, till they are a strong ...
-Filbert - Seedy
Filbert Rub a pound of butter into three pounds and a half of flour; make a hole, and put in ten ounces of powdered loaf sugar; wet up with four table-spoonsful of honey water, one of orange-flower w...
-Wine - Savoy Cake To Represent A Melon
Wine Take two pounds of flour, two pounds of butter, and four ounces of sifted loaf sugar; rub the sugar and the butter into the flour, and make it into a stiff paste with milk; pound it in a mortar;...
-Savoy Cake To Imitate A Hedgehog - Almond Cakes
Savoy Cake To Imitate A Hedgehog Bake a cake in a mould of that form; blanch some Valentia or Jordan almonds; cut them into small fillets and stick them over the surface, to form the quills or prickl...
-Almond Savoy - Curd Cheese
Almond Savoy Take one ounce of bitter and three ounces of sweet almonds; boil and skin them; put them into a mortar, with the yolks of six eggs, and half a pound of loaf sugar, pounded very fine; the...
-Almond Cheese - Plum
Almond Cheese Take three or four bitter, and one ounce of sweet almonds; boil and skin them; put them into a mortar, with two ounces of loaf sugar, and the yolks of two eggs; pound them fine. Then ru...
-Prussian - Raspberry
Prussian Rub four ounces of butter into seven pounds of flour; wet up with one quart of milk, warm, one pint of warm water, four yolks of eggs, and half a pint of good thick yeast; but if you are obl...
-Ratafias - Twelfth
Ratafias Take four ounces of bitter, and four ounces of sweet almonds - boil and skim them; put them into a mortar, with one pound of loaf sugar, and the whites of four eggs; pound it together very f...
-Yorkshire - Vanilla Biscuit
Yorkshire Rub four ounces of butter into seven pounds of flour, wet up with one quart of warm milk, one pint of warm water, and half or three-quarters of a pint of good yeast, let it prove about twen...
-Trifle - Biscuit A La CuilliéRe (Spoon Biscuit)
Trifle Place several alternate layers of Savoy biscuit and bitter almond maccaroons in a handsome glass bowl, or dish, and saturate them with the best Madeira wine; cover the surface of the top layer...
-Small Biscuits With Almonds - Almond Bread
Small Biscuits With Almonds Prepare three yolks as usual; work them ten minutes with four ounces of sugar and an ounce of pounded bitter almonds; add a whole egg, and work together full five minutes ...
-Colchester - Thick Ginger-Bread
Colchester Prepare your dough as for Bath cakes; cut it with a Colchester cutter to about the thickness of a penny-piece, wash it with milk, bake it quick, wash it with egg and milk, while hot; when ...
-Sweetmeat Nuts - Buckwheat Cakes
Sweetmeat Nuts Prepare seven pounds of treacle; mix four ounces of ground ginger, six ounces of ground allspice, eight ounces of candied lemon and orange, cut small, with nine pounds of flour; wet it...
-Flannel Cakes - Tart Paste
Flannel Cakes Melt a table-spoonful of butter in a quart of milk, and after stirring it well, set it away to cool; then heat four eggs very light, and stir them into the milk in turn with half a poun...
-Apricot Tart - Apple Bread
Apricot Tart Lay your puff paste in patties; put your jam in the middle, and bake them in a brisk oven; or you may bake your puff paste first with a bit of bread in the middle; then take out the brea...
-Meslin Bread - Potatoe Bread
Meslin Bread A good bread is made in many parts of England from what is called meslin, which is a mixture of rye and wheat. This is raised on one and the same ground at the same time, and passes thro...







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