Open the oysters and strain the liquor. Put to the liquor some grated stale bread, and a little pepper and nutmeg, adding a glass of white wine. Boil the liquor with these ingredients, and then pour it scalding hot over the dish of raw oysters. This will cook them sufficiently.

Have ready some slices of buttered toast with the crust cut off. When the oysters are done, dip the toast in the liquor, and lay the pieces round the sides and in the bottom of a deep dish. Pour the oysters and liquor upon the toast, and send them to table hot.

Another Way Of Stewing Oysters

Strain all the liquor from the oysters, and thicken the liquor with stale bread grated (which is much better than flour) some whole pepper, and some rnace. Grate some nutmeg into it. Boil the liquor without the oysters, - adding a piece of butter rolled in flour.

Lay a slice of buttered toast in the bottom of a deep dish, and surround the sides with small slices cut into three corner or pointed pieces. All the crust must be cut off from the toast.

Put the raw oysters into the dish of toast, and when the liquor has boiled hard, pour it scalding hot over them. Cover the dish closely, and let it set for five minutes or more, before you send it to table. This will cook the oysters sufficiently, will swell them to a larger size, and cause them to retain more of their flavor than when stewed in the liquor.

Take care not to make it too thick with the grated bread.

Stewed Oysters (1)

Stew with a quart of oysters, and their liquor strained, a glass of white wine, one anchovy bruised, seasoned with white pepper, salt, a little mace, and a bunch of sweet herbs; let all stew gently a quarter of an hour. Pick out the bunch of herbs, and add a quarter of a pound of fresh butter kneaded in a large ta-ble-spoonful of flour, and stew them ten or twelve minutes. Serve them garnished with bread-sippets and cut lemon. They may be stewed simply in their own liquor, seasoned with salt, pepper, and grated nutmeg, and thickened with cream, flour, and butter.

Stewed Oysters (2)

Open the oysters and strain the liquor. Put to them some grated stale bread, and a little pepper and nutmeg. Throw them into the liquor, and add a glass of white wine. Let them stew but a very short time, or they will be hard. Have ready some slices of buttered toast with the crust off. When the oysters are done, dip the toast in the liquor, and lay the pieces round the sides and in the bottom of a deep dish. Pour the oysters and liquor upon the toast and send them to table hot.

Stewed Oysters (3)

Large oysters will do for stewing, and by some are preferred. Stew a couple of dozen of these in their own liquor; when they are coming to a boil, skim well, lake them up and beard them; strain the liquor through a tamis-sieve, and lay the oysters on a dish. Put an ounce of butter into a stewpan; when it is melted, put to it as much Hour as will dry it up, the liquor of the oysters, and three table-spoonfuls of milk or cream, and a little white pepper and salt; to this some cooks add a little ketchup, or finely-chopped parsley, grated lemon-peel, and juice; let it boil up for a couple of minutes, till it is smooth, then take it off the fire, put in the oysters, and let them gel warm (they must not themselves be boiled, or they will become hard); line the bottom and sides of a hash-dish with bread-sippets, and pour your oysters and sauce into it.