Corn Boiled On The Cob

Corn should be cooked as quickly as possible after picking, as it heats, and loses its sweetness. If necessary to keep over night, spread it out singly on the cold cellar floor. When ready to cook, remove the husks and every thread of silk. Put in a kettle of boiling water, and boil rapidly, after it begins to boil, five minutes. When done, take out with a skimmer, heap on a platter, and serve immediately.

How To Eat

Score every row of grains with a sharp knife, spread lightly with butter, dust with salt, and with the teeth press out the centre of the grain leaving the hull on the cob. Thus eaten it will cause no trouble, as the hull is the only indigestible part.

Corn Boiled In The Husks

Remove the green outside husks, leaving the cob well covered with the inner light husks. Throw into a kettle of boiling water, and boil rapidly, after it begins to boil, ten minutes. When done, take out, drain, pull the silk from the end of the cob, and serve in the husks.

Corn Fritters

1 dozen ears of corn 2 eggs

1 teaspoonful of baking-powder

1/2 pint of milk

1 cup of flour 1/2 teaspoonful of salt

2 dashes of black pepper

Score the corn down the centre of each row of grains, then with the back of the knife press out the pulp, leaving the hull on the cob. Do not grate the corn, as in that way you get the hull. To this pulp add the milk, the yolks of the eggs, salt, pepper and flour; beat well. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and stir them and the baking-powder carefully into the mixture. Put lard or dripping into a frying-pan; when hot, drop the mixture by spoonfuls into the deep fat. When brown on one side, turn and brown the other. Take out with a skimmer (do not pierce them with a fork, as it makes them heavy), drain on brown paper, and serve very hot.

Canned corn may be used, allowing one pint finely chopped.

Corn Oysters

Score and press the corn as directed in preceding recipe, and to every pint of pulp allow

2 eggs

2 heaping tablespoonfuls of flour

1/2 teaspoonful of salt 1 dash of cayenne 1 dash of black pepper

Beat the eggs separately; add first the yolks and then the whites to the corn, mix gently, add the salt, cayenne, pepper, and flour; mix again. Put two tablespoonfuls of lard or butter in a frying-pan; when hot, drop the mixture by spoonfuls into it; when brown on one side, turn and brown the other. Serve very hot.

Corn Pudding

1 dozen large ears of young corn 4 eggs

1 pint of milk

1 teaspoonful of salt

1/4 teaspoonful of black pepper

Score the corn down the centre of each row of grains, then with the back of the knife press out all the pulp, leaving the hull on the cob. Beat the whites and yolks of the eggs separately, add the yolks to the corn, mix thoroughly; then add the salt, pepper and milk, and stir in carefully the whites of the eggs. Brush a pudding dish lightly with butter, and pour in the mixture. Bake slowly one hour. Serve as an accompaniment to roast beef or lamb.

Succotash

1 pint of young lima or kidney beans 1 pint of corn pressed from the cob 1/2 pint of milk or cream 1 tablespoonful of butter Salt and pepper to taste

Shell the beans, cover them with boiling water, add a teaspoonful of salt, and boil twenty-five minutes; then add an eighth-teaspoonful of baking-soda, boil one minute, and drain. Score the corn and press it from the cob, add it to the beans, then add the milk, butter, salt, and pepper, stir continually over the fire for five minutes, and it is ready to serve.

In winter, when the corn and beans are dried, soak both separately over night. In the morning, cover the beans with fresh water and boil gently for two hours. Do not drain the water from the corn, but keep it on the back part of the fire where it will not boil during the two hours the beans are boiling. When the beans are tender, drain them, add them to the corn, which should have just water enough to cover. Cook slowly for twenty minutes, then add the cream, butter, salt, and pepper.

This may also be made from canned corn and beans.

How To Cook Canned Corn

Open the top of the can with a can-opener, turn out the corn into a saucepan, add to it a quarter-cup of cream, a tablespoonful of butter, and salt and pepper to taste; stir over the fire until very hot, and it is ready to serve.

How To Dry Corn

Remove the husks and silk from the cob, score the corn down the centre of each row of grains, then, with the back of the knife, press out all the pulp, leaving the hull on the cob. Spread this pulp on tin sheets or baking-pans, and dry in a very moderate oven. Watch carefully, or the corn will brown; stir three or four times while drying. If the oven is just right it will take about three hours to dry. When dry, put into bags and hang away in a cool, dry place.

How To Cook Dried Corn

Cover one pint of corn with warm water and stand it on the back part of the fire over night. In the morning, if it has absorbed all the water, add more, and cook slowly two hours, or until you are ready to use; then add salt, pepper, a tablespoonful of butter, and a half-pint of cream.

Cold Corn

Cold corn left from dinner may be cut from the cob, covered with milk, and stewed five minutes. Season with a bit of butter, salt and pepper.

Corn Salad

Corn salad may be washed, cooked and served the same as spinach.