Mr. Downing's leader, in the Nov. number of the Horticultur-ist, "The Favorite Poison of America," is however, the article which is most attractive, as most coincident with my own notions: for it I feel constrained to extend a hand across lake and mountain, to give him the grip of follow-ship. You are right, Mr. Downing - wage war on the stoves. Oh, that we had some chivalrous Knight, armed with battle-ax and mace, ready to inarch across every valley and hill of the country, through every street and alley of our cities, destroying, as he went, those villainous stoves, the Demons of the Castle of Hypochondriasis, as good old John Bunyan would probably have called them, had he lived in this degenerate age of pale faces and hot stove rooms. With such a destroying champion of our cause abroad, ah, what music would resound in our ears, from kitchin and cellar, from parlor and chamber, as the stalwart blows fell upon "airtight" and "ten-plate," cooking-stove, coal-range and furnace! Who would not sue for the honor of Knight-erranty in such a cause, and believe that he could still do his country some good service under such a leader!

In serious truth, we fear the worst effects from the deleterious influences pointed out by Mr. Downing. It is a growing evil, far more serious in the Eastern States than we in the West can well imagine. In my visits to an eastern city, the loss of the open fires is everywhere oppressively felt - furnaces, furnaces, nothing but furnaces - no bright cheerful fires to enliven a dry stove - which I sincerely hope is not yet invented, except to hatch chickens.

In the parlors of my eastern friends, there were elegant pictures and beautiful flowers, and devoted lovers of these specimens of the fine arts; but they had discarded that which is far more beautiful than pictures or flowers, the bright, breathing, sparkling, crackling, open wood fire. What picture, by Rubens or Guido, can equal it in its colors? what flower, not even the Victoria regia, can compare with its life and varying change? Still, amid all the dry heat that every where prevailed, there was one dear old lady, who was not to be turned, e'en by fashion's irresistible force, from the gratification of her more refined and less highly educated taste, but who kept the old open wood fire, with straight sticks, of dry hickory, the picture of old fashioned neatness and comfort, the hearth neatly swept, and the andirons with their brass balls burnished as brightly as though they were representing the satellites of Jupiter. Alas! where now arc those nice brasses? - banished from the parlor. I loved this old lady for her quaint persistance in the olden ways - it struck a chord of sympathy in my own heart, which vibrates afresh as I sit here now, in front of a blazing fire.

The frost has wrapped all nature, without, in his cerements of death; the wind sings his mournful requiem of summer gone, and the very fallen leaves rustle as they rift closer and closer together in the shelter of some little shrub in every sheltered nook; but within, all is cheerful and gay - the fire crackles and rejoices, and the cricket on the hearth comes forth with his merry and contented notes. Hearths, too; what are to become of them and their genial associations of social ties and social joys! are they all to be swept away? and for what? What new happiness have you with which to replace them? When far away from home, where does fancy picture dear ones? - surely around the blazing fire. When memory calls up scenes of early childhood, are they not of the same place, whence we looked up into the faces of dear parents? Yes, the recollections of boyhood and manhood are all connected most pleasantly together at this spot, and the hearth-stone becomes sacred to us all - we love it, we cherish it, and, if needs be, we would fight for it.

Good friends, in earnest truth, beware how you cast from yon one single source of happiness, one single cause of joy. We have too little of either in this weary life of disappointments, to be reckless of the one or of the other. Economy and neat housekeeping are most exAnalysis of the Peach. - According to promise, I send you for publication, an analysis of the ashes of three of our most valuable sorts of the Peach, viz: of the Yellow Rareripe, Morris Red Rareripe and Morrisania Pound. I took about equal quantities of limbs and twigs of these three kinds, from healthy trees, burned them carefully and with a moderate heat, having first thoroughly dried them. They lost in drying about 44 per cent of their weight, of water. The branches when dried yielded about one-thirty-sixth part of their weight, in ashes.

115 grains of Ash gave of Charcoal and Sand....

3.180

do of Silica..............

1.480

do of perexide of Iron.............

930

do of peroxide of Manganese....

800

do of Lime...........

31.060

do of Magnesia.................

7.052

do of Potash...............

12.545

do of Soda................

2.277

do of Phosphoric Acid...........

16.752

do of Sulphuric do............

1.320

do of Chlorine..................

422

do of Carbonic Acid.............

33.350

111.188

The above are the results separately as found by analysis, with a loss of three grains and about eight-tenths of a grain, to be added to the above to make up the 115 grains, thus - 111.188

Loss,

8.812

116.000

It is most useful to unite several of these constituents in their combining proportions, the Chlorine to its proportion of Sodium; the Lime to its Phosphoric acid; Sulphuric acid and Peroxide of Iron. The numbers will then be arranged thus: -

Charcoal and sand..........

3.180

Silica.......

1.480

Perphosphate of Iron......

2.174

Potash.........

12.545

Soda..........

2.000

Sulphate of Lime.......

2.258

Lime.........

23.951

Phosphate of Lime......

21.699

Magnesia........

7.052

Peroxide of Manganese..

800

Chloride of Sodium....

699

Carbonic Acid.....

33.350

111.188

Loss in analysis....

3.812

115.000

The peach trees grew on a lime-stone soil, that had been but little tilled, and had been well manured. These facts may account for the abundance of Lime in their composition. Analysis shows that even the wood of our fine fruits, for instance, the Pear. Peach. Apple and the committee being assisted in this portion of their duties by the refined taste of the ladies who so kindly volunteered their aid on this occasion. The large and elegant evergreen arbor opposite the entrance, formed a very conspicuous object, presenting a great variety of wild flowers tastefully grouped together; and supported by two immense coruncopiae, pouring forth their abundant treasures - the one, of vegetable productions, and the other of fruits in great variety. Over the center door was a tablet containing the name of Pomona, surrounded with a rich border of fruits. The eastern door was surmounted with a similar tablet, containing the name of Ceres, with a chaste wreathing of grains and grasses; while Flora occupied a similar position over the western door, decked with a gorgeous array of flowers.