Grouping Of Plants

There is no way in which the deadening •formalism of our gardens may be more effectually destroyed than by the system of naturally grouping hardy plants. It may afford most pleasing results, and impress on others the amount of variety and loveliness to be obtained from many families now unused. Trees and shrubs, distinguished for their fine foliage, collected in a quiet glade; and then bright-foliage trees should be set in contrast with quieter colors, and varied with bright beds of flowers and leaf plants, or hardy flowering shrubs. . Those groups should be irregularly but artistically planted. Then on a knoll plant a large bouquet of the rosaceous family - hawthorns, cherries, plums, pears, peaches, almonds, etc. There is so much that may be done to add to the bewildering beauty of a landscape by naturally artistic planting, that we are often astonished that people do not "see it." - Rural New Yorker.

Grouping Plants

There is no way in which the deadening formalism of our gardens may be more effectually destroyed than by the system of naturally grouping hardy plants. It may afford most pleasing results, and impress on others the amount of variety and loveliness to be obtained from many families now unused. Trees and shrubs, distinguished for their fine foliage, collected in a quiet glade; and then bright foliage trees should be set in contrast with quieter colors, and varied with bright beds of flowers and leaf plants, or hardy flowering shrubs. Those groups should be irregularly, but artistically, planted. Then, on a knoll, plant a large bouquet of the rosaceous family - hawthorns, cherries, plums, pears, peaches, almonds, etc. There is so much that may be done to add to the bewildering beauty of a landscape by naturally artistic planting, that we are often astonished that people do not " see it." - Rural New -Yorker.

Grouth Of Forest Trees

At a recent meeting of the Elmira Club, Mr. Fletcher Carr gave the subjoined schedule of measurements, made 12 years after planting: "White maple, 1 foot in diameter and 20 in height; white willow, 1 feet in diameter and 40 in height; white ash, 10 inches in diameter and 20 in height; yellow willow, 1 in diameter and 40 in height; Lom-bardy poplar, 10 inches in diameter and 40 in height; chestnut, 10 inches in diameter and 20 in height; black walnut and butternut, 10 inches in diameter and 20 in height; while the different kinds of evergreens will make an average growth of from 18 to 20 inches in height annually."

Growing Asparagus

Thanks for this record; to many it will probably be new; to me it is no novelty. I have tried this transplanting process as much as here described; have practiced sowing my seed immediately in the bed where designed to be permanent, and as they grew, thinned out the plants to proper spaces; and have also grown beds of fine asparagus by taking up plants (self sowed) from an old bed, when about six inches high, and replanting them.

In either case success came.

After all, the amateur who only wants a small bed had better purchase good, strong two-year-old plants, and set them in ground dug deep and made rich. And furthermore, if his ground is dry, let him set his plants in trenches eight inches deep, and cover as usual at first, and drawing on more soil from year to year, until about the third year the ground is level. Some of the very best asparagus beds that I know have been so prepared.