These plants are hardy as far north as the Canadian northwest and will survive under extreme exposure. This group has been subdivided in order more clearly to differentiate between plants which should be used for their different characteristics under different exposures.

a. Late foliage:

Syringa vulgaris (not variety alba) Common Lilac b. Close shearing:

Berberis thunbergi Thunberg's Japanese Barberry

Caragana arborescens

Siberian Pea Shrub Caragana microphylla

Dahurian Pea Shrub

Elaeagnus angustifolia

Russian Olive Rhamnus cathartica

Common Buckthorn Shepherdia argentea

Buffalo Berry

Shepherdia canadensis (on lime) Canadian Buffalo Berry c. Unsheared low hedges:

Berberis thunbergi Thunberg's Japanese Barberry

Spiraea vanhouttei Van Houtte's Bridal Wreath d. Fruiting hedges:

Berberis thunbergi

Thunberg's Japanese Barberry Crataegus (in variety)

Thorn Hippophae rhamnoides

Sea Buckthorn Rhamnus cathartica

Common Buckthorn

Rosa (in variety) Native Rose

Rosa rugosa Japanese Rose

Shepherdia argentea Buffalo Berry

Shepherdia canadensis (on lime) Canadian Buffalo Berry

Symphoricarpos (in variety) Snowberry e. Shady places:

Acer saccharinum Silver Maple

Crataegus monogyna English Hawthorn

Lonicera xylosteum Fly Bush Honeysuckle

Philadelphus coronarius Common Mock Orange

Spiraea vanhouttei Van Houtte's Bridal Wreath

Symphoricarpos racemosus Snowberry

Plate XX

Plate XX. An effective combination of stone work and of plantings in an informal lawn. Varieties of stonecrop, moss pinks and Scotch pinks lend charm to an otherwise uninteresting mass of stone. (See plate LIII, page 334, for lily planting shown in background of this picture.) (See page 139)

Plate XXI

Plate XXI. An uninteresting rocky slope often can be turned into an attractive landscape feature through the careful selection and planting of plants adapted to light, sandy soils. This slope is covered with a grouping of hardy pinks, evergreen candy-tuft, saxifrage and tufted pansy. (See page 139)