For transplanting small seedlings of trees and shrubs a well-protected spot should be selected, and the ground should be prepared to a depth of twelve or fifteen inches by deep spading and careful raking. Prepare the area in the same way as for a vegetable garden. The little plants, which should not have been exposed at all to the warm air or drying winds, are then best puddled before they are lined out. But in this actual planting there is danger of permitting the mud in which they were puddled to become hardened about their roots. Further to safeguard them, particularly if they are evergreens, it is necessary to shade them until they are well established in the new home. Some evergreens, particularly the small shrubby kinds, need such shading even beyond the first year.

Fig. A

Fig. A

Fig. B

Fig. B

Plate VII. Immediately after transplanting, the trunk of every large tree should be protected with a covering of burlap (Fig. B) which prevents excessive drying out and consequent cracking and loosening of the bark (Fig A). This protection is especially necessary during the warmer summer months. (See page 44)

Transplanting Small Seedlings 22Plate VIII

Plate VIII. To most of us in the Northern States the method of seeding a lawn is familiar, but the method of making lawns in the Southern States by planting Bermuda grass, is little known. In these photographs small clumps of Bermuda grass are being planted in "hills" staggered at intervals ranging from 18 inches to 30 inches. The thicker the planting the more quickly a mat of turf can be developed. (See page 62)