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Practical Dietetics: With Reference To Diet In Disease | by Alida Frances Pattee



As instructor of dietetics at various hospitals I have constantly felt the need of a simple manual and text-book for the use of the nurse in the classroom. None could be found which fulfilled the requirements as to simplicity, brevity, and exactness, with reference to dietetic treatment in disease. This same need has been expressed by mothers and nurses outside of the hospital. In the following pages I have endeavored to meet this need by giving the result of knowledge gained during the past eight years of practical classwork experience in hospitals of different cities.

TitlePractical Dietetics: With Reference To Diet In Disease
AuthorAlida Frances Pattee
PublisherA. F. Pattee
Year1914
Copyright1910, Alida Frances Pattee
AmazonPractical Dietetics: With Reference to Diet in Disease

By Alida Frances Pattee, Graduate, Department of Household Arts, State Normal School, Framingham, Mass. Late Instructor in Dietetics, Bellevue Training School for Nurses, Beilevue Hospital, New York City. Former Instructor at Mount Sinai, Hahnemann, and the Flower Hospital Training Schools for Nurses, New York City; Lakeside, St. Mary's, Trinity, and Wisconsin Training Schools for Nurses, Milwaukee, Wis ; St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, 111.; St. Vincent de Paul Hospital, Brockville, Ontario, Canada.

Eighth Edition

Revised and Enlarged.

To the trained nurse: Whose daily life is a blessing to humanity.

-Preface
Preface To The Sixth Edition The very gratifying demand for this work has necessitated the preparation of a sixth edition. Advantage has been taken of this opportunity to revise the book and incorp...
-Preface To The Second Edition
The very cordial reception of the first edition of Practical Dietetics has encouraged a second presentation. In the preparation of the second issue the original matter has been thoroughly revised, ...
-Introduction. Course Of Study In Dietetics
In response to the many requests of Superintendents of Training Schools and Dietitians for an outline of the various State Board Requirements in Dietetics, I herewith quote with permission the followi...
-Course Of Study In Dietetics Arranged By The New York State Board
Preliminary Term Dietetics, 14 hours Theory Water: source, function, varieties of drinking water, source of disease. Beverages: tea, coffee, cocoa, chocolate; history and growth of plants; compo...
-Course Of Study In Dietetics Arranged By The Oregon State Board Of Examiners Of Nurses
Preliminary Term Dietetics. Second Four Weeks. Simple nourishments. Hospital diet lists. Times of feeding. Methods of feeding. Preparation of the following, to be served to patients: Mi...
-Course Of Study In Dietetics Arranged By The Vermont State Board Of Examiners Of Nurses
Dietetics Classification of foods, care of foods, cooking of foods, serving of foods. Tray-setting and food serving: feeding of helpless and delirious patients; management of liquid diet. Cou...
-State Examination Questions In Dietetics
Colorado 1909 1. Mention one good nutritive enema. 2. What is included under the head of liquid diet? 3. How do you make albumin water? 4. What is the appearance of healthy beef; chicke...
-State Examination Questions In Dietetics. Part 2
January, 1910 1. Give a brief description of the care of glass drinking tubes used by typhoid patients. 2. Give recipe for (1) partial peptonisation of milk; (2) junket. 3. Mention the foods ...
-State Examination Questions In Dietetics. Part 3
District Of Columbia 1908 I. Name three foodstuffs rich in albumin in the order of their importance. 2. Describe process of digestion and absorption of albuminoids. 3. What is the object o...
-State Examination Questions In Dietetics. Part 4
Missouri June, 1913 1. Name different classes of foodstuffs, and give an example of each. 2. Give theory of cooking starches, and tell where and by what digested. 3. (a) What is Predigeste...
-State Examination Questions In Dietetics. Part 5
February, 1911 1. Why should the nurse have a, working knowledge of dietetics? 2. Classify the food principles as (a) organic or inorganic, (b) nitrogenous or non-nitrogenous. 3. Explain why ...
-State Examination Questions In Dietetics. Part 6
June 1913 1. Define (a) chyme, (6) chyle. 2. At what age may a healthy child begin to digest starches? 3. In what organs and by what enzymes are starches digested? 4. Mention three results...
-State Examination Questions In Dietetics. Part 7
November, 1912 1. (a) Define foodstuffs, (b) What are the uses of food? 2. (a) What causes milk to sour? (b) What preventive measures can be used to keep milk from becoming sour? 3. Describe ...
-State Examination Questions In Dietetics. Part 8
October, 1913 1. How would you cook a steak? A chop? What are th2 advantages of your method of cooking over other methods? 2. How long would you cook a cereal? Why? 3. How would you make a cu...
-State Examination Questions In Dietetics. Part 9
1910 1. How would you prepare a beefsteak? Give reasons for method employed. 2. Why is the saliva an important factor in the digestive process? 3. If you wish to keep the juice in meat, how ...
-Part I. Principles Of Nutrition And Food Preparations. Chapter I. Food
Ditions from the fuel and water (and air) which it consumes, so the living body derives its energy from the food, water and air upon which it subsists. Definition Of Food Poods are substance...
-Classification Of Food
Foods may be classified in various ways: a. According to Source, as animal, vegetable, and mineral (including oxygen for combustion). b. According to Chemical Composition, as organic and inorganic,...
-Important Sources Of Proteins, Carbohydrates, Mineral Matter
Important Sources Of Proteins Milk, eggs, meat, fish, cheese, beans, peas, lentils, some nuts and cereals. Important Sources of Fats: Olive oil, butter, cream, bacon and other fat meat, and nuts...
-Conditions For Perfect Nutrition
For the proper support of the human system, a combination of nitrogenous and non-nitrogenous foods is essential, with water to dissolve them and oxygen to burn them. Although air is not classified as ...
-Nitrogenous Foods
Nitrogenous substances are those which contain nitrogen, an element which is essential to the life of every cell. Classification In older classifications, the term Protein is used to include all...
-Nitrogenous Foods. Part 2
Animal Proteins The albumins in the ordinary diet are derived chiefly from animal foods. The white of egg is a very pure form of this compound, and eggs constitute one of the best sources of nitrog...
-Nitrogenous Foods. Part 3
Cooking Of Protein Of all the proteins, Albumin, of which there are many varieties, is the most important and needs most care in the cooking to make it easily digested. The majority of albumin...
-Non-Nitrogenous Foods. Carbohydrates (Sugar And Starch): Fats
Strictly speaking, any food substance not protein, even water and mineral water, is non-nitrogenous; but in the restricted sense of food as a source of energy, it is applied to two classes of organic ...
-Dextrose Or Grape Sugar (Glucose)
Description Dextrose occurs as a syrup, rarely in crystalline form. It is much less sweet than cane sugar. Other sugars have to be changed to this form before the body can use them. Sources ...
-Lactose
Milk Sugar Or Lactose This sugar is found almost exclusively in milk, from which it is commercially prepared. It has little sweetness and does not readily ferment. Until recently it has entered but...
-Cane Sugar
Pure cane sugar is chemically the same as beet-sugar. Maple sugar would not be different from common sugar, if it were sufficiently purified to remove the flavoring matter. Description Cane suga...
-Sugars
Sugar Definition Sugars are carbohydrates which are soluble, have a more or less sweet taste and many minor qualities which distinguish them from the starches. The disaccharides yield monosaccharid...
-Starch And Other Polysaccharides
Starchy foods form a large part of the ordinary diet of man; they are the chief source of the carbohydrates. Starch, unlike sugar, is insoluble but may be made to pass into a soluble form by dry-heati...
-Starch And Other Polysaccharides. Continued
Chemical Principles Since raw starch is digestible only to a slight degree, it is essential to perfect digestion that starchy foods be cooked. In the presence of moisture, starch is made soluble...
-Fats And Oils
Definition Fats are food-stuffs having the same ultimate chemical composition as carbohydrates; i. e., consisting of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, but the latter element is present in less proportio...
-Fats And Oils. Continued
Sources Of Fat In The Diet The chief sources of fat in the diet are milk (yielding cream and butter), olive oil, meat fats (especially lard, bacon and salt pork, beef suet and drippings), and oily ...
-Water
Composition And Properties Water is a compound of hydrogen and oxygen, consisting of two parts by volume of oxygen to one of hydrogen. Absolutely pure water is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, b...
-Classification Of Varieties Of Drinking Waters
The classification of water as food is based chiefly on its purity and palatability. Hard And Soft Water Water containing calcium (lime) or magnesium salts is known as hard water; and if it ...
-Mineral Matter
Function The mineral matter in the body serves the most varied ends. It gives solidity to the bones and teeth; its presence in body fluids, such as blood and lymph, imparts to them a certain degree...
-Mineral Matter. Part 2
Source Of Mineral Matter In The Food The mineral matter received into the body comes either from the solid food or dietetic fluids. With the exception of sodium chlorid (common salt) it is not usua...
-Mineral Matter. Part 3
Use Of Mineral Matter In Disease In health, deprivation of salt soon leads to great loss of vitality, but in various diseases reduction in the consumption of salt is known to be beneficial. Thus in...
-Food Accessories Or Adjuncts. Condiments - Beverages Condiments
Condiments are substances not necessarily possessing nutritive value, which are used to give sapidity to tasteless or unappetizing dishes. To what extent they have any specific action on the functions...
-Beverages
These food accessories comprise milk, coffee, tea, cocoa and chocolate, alcoholic drinks, lemonade and other acid drinks, aerated and carbonated drinks. Milk is a food rather than a beverage, becoming...
-Chapter II. Nutrition
Digestion - Absorption - Metabolism. Under this term is usually understood the digestion and absorption of nourishment, its assimilation and utilization, its storage in excess, and finally the elim...
-Digestion. Digestion Of Proteins
Digestion In The Stomach Protein is not chemically altered in the mouth. The process of chewing simply moistens and divides it into small particles so that it is easily swallowed and more readily a...
-Digestion. Digestion Of Proteins. Continued
Digestion In The Intestines On entering the duodenum, the acid chyme from the stomach meets three secretions, all alkaline in reaction, namely, the pancreatic juice, the bile, and the intestinal ju...
-Digestion Of Fat
Fat is not acted upon by the secretions of the mouth nor to any great extent by those of the stomach. The gastric juice contains an enzyme, called gastric lipase, which has the power of acting on emul...
-Digestion Of Carbohydrates
1. Digestion Of Starch There is little doubt that primitive man accomplished much of the digestion of starch in the mouth. The saliva contains two enzymes, ptyalin, and mal-tase. By the action of p...
-Digestion Of Carbohydrates. Continued
2. Digestion Of Sugars Although sugars are perfectly soluble and easily absorbed, they must all be converted into monosaccharides or simple sugars (chiefly dextrose), before they can be utilized by...
-Factors Determining Rate of Digestion
We know of the existence of many factors which influence salivary and gastric digestion, but much less about intestinal digestion. Among these are the nature of the food, cookery, appetite, masticatio...
-Absorption
While absorption through a permeable animal membrane outside the body may be a simple physical process, following the ordinary laws of pressure, diffusion, osmosis, etc., the ease is far otherwise in ...
-Absorption. Continued
Absorption Of Carbohydrates The end products of carbohydrate digestion pass to the blood by way of the portal system. The monosaccharides on reaching the liver enter the general circulation as dext...
-Metabolism
Metabolism is the sum of the chemical changes taking place in the cells of the body in connection with all biological processes, including growth, repair and waste, generation and maintenance of heat,...
-Excretion
The waste products of metabolism and all unutilized food, along with the products of oxidation, are eliminated from the system in several ways. Water escapes through the lungs, skin and kidneys. Aside...
-Chapter III. Food Values
Nitrogen Balance - Energy Value Of Food. We are now in position to understand something of food values, which depend on the food actually utilized in the body, to the exclusion of food unabsorbed, ...
-Nitrogen Balance Or Nitrogen Equilibrium
In body building and repairing, the nitrogen of protein food is indispensable. In the other functions, nitrogen is not utilized. Carbohydrates and fats are the natural and convenient sources of energy...
-The Energy Value Of Food
In Liebig's time it was recognized that animal heat was generated by carbohydrates and fats, but the physiologists of that day did not realize that these were the nutrients which furnished the body wi...
-Determination Of Energy Value Of Food
To determine the energy value of a given amount of any food, it is necessary to know first its composition, i. e., the percentages of protein, fat, and carbohydrate present. Tables are available givin...
-The Energy Requirements Of The Body
Work goes on continually in the living body, whether asleep or awake, idle or active, sick or well. In the resting body it consists of such internal work as that of digestion and absorption, circulati...
-The Energy Requirements Of The Body. Continued
As an aid to easy estimation of the food value of any diet, the following tables have been introduced, showing the nutritive value of the food materials used in the recipes in this book, calculated fo...
-Chapter IV. Feeding The Sick
General Rules In the treatment of disease there are few questions which have to be considered so often in the daily routine of practice as those which concern the proper support and nourishment of ...
-Feeding The Sick. Part 2
Feeding In Acute Disease The preparation of food for those who are seriously ill is a matter of vital importance, for the life of the patient often depends either upon the maintenance of strength d...
-Feeding The Sick. Part 3
The Appetite As the appetite of the sick often requires tempting, the greatest pains should be taken in the preparation of the invalid's food. The lack of desire for food may be due merely to defec...
-Feeding The Sick. Part 4
Bathing And Cleansing The Mouth When possible, it is well to bathe the patient's face and hands before offering a meal. The mouth should be rinsed each time after eating with pure water, or diluted...
-Feeding The Sick. Part 5
Nasal Feeding In nasal feeding a nasal tube is employed or in case of infant a catheter. Have either well oiled and passed gently through the nose into the oesophagus and then into the stomach. Bef...
-Feeding The Sick. Part 6
The technique is most important. The rectum should first be cleaned by a high injection of decinormal saline solution, after which no attempt should be made to give a nourishing injection for at least...
-Chapter V. The Tray
The writer's intention is only to suggest to the nurse the best and simplest methods of arranging the tray and a few of the important details. These things seem trivial, but it must be remembered t...
-Chapter VI. Methods Of Cooking And Cake Of Food
Cooking is the preparation of food for eating. Digestibility and Nutritive Value of cooked food depends to a considerable extent upon the manner in which it is cooked and served. The time and tempe...
-Methods Of Cooking And Cake Of Food. Continued
Cooking Utensils A nurse should always have at hand a standard measuring cup, divided into thirds and fourths. Wooden spoons are preferable to metal ones for mixing and stirring, as metal spoons ar...
-Cake Of Food
The care of food between the time of purchase and cooking, and that of cooking and serving is highly important. The fact that spoiled food represents an economic loss, important as it is, is much less...
-Cake Of Food. Part 2
Preserving Foods Foods to be preserved should be perfectly fresh. Yeo gives four methods of preservation: (1) Drying is the method most available for preserving peas, beans, prunes, apricots and...
-Chapter VII. Measures And Weights
Accurate measurement is necessary to insure success in cooking. All dry ingredients, such as flour, meal, confectioners' or powdered sugar, should be sifted before measuring. Mustard, cream of t...
-Measures And Weights. Part 2
Apothecaries Weights 20 grains .............................. = 1 scruple, 3 scruples ............................. = 1 drachm, 3 8 drachms (or 480 grains) ............. =1 ounce, ...
-Measures And Weights. Part 3
Table For Preparing Percentage Solutions Public Charities and the Department of Bellevue and Allied Hospitals 1 One fluid ounce of water, or 480 minims, weighs 456.4 grains. One pint of water, o...
-Measures And Weights. Part 4
2. To Prepare One Fluid Ounce Of A Solution REQUIRED TO CONTAIN OF A SUBSTANCE TAKE OF THE SUBSTANCE APPROX. And enough ...
-Thermometry
The thermometers used by the nurse in cookery, in regulating the heat of the room or in taking the patient's temperatures are chiefly of the Fahrenheit scale. Scientists employ the Centigrade scale in...
-Part II. Beverages, Animal Foods, Vegetable Foods, Nutritious Desserts. Chapter VIII. Beverages
Acid - Albuminous - Starchy - Miscellaneous Beverages, Including Tea, Coffee, Chocolate, And Cocoa, And Special Non-Nutritive Beverages. Beverages serve primarily to relieve thirst. The universal b...
-Acid Beverages
Beverages made from fruit juices are cooling and refreshing, and hence especially grateful to fever patients. They are valuable for the organic acids, mineral matter, and sugar which they contain. Som...
-Sweetening Acid Drinks
For the diabetic, sugar must be replaced by Sweetina. Whenever cold water is to be used instead of very hot or boiling water in preparing the drinks, it is preferable to use sugar syrup for sweet...
-Sweetening Acid Drinks. Part 2
Egg Lemonade See Albuminous Beverages for recipe. Page 121. Orangeade, 197 Calories 1 sour orange. 2 tablespoons sugar. cup boiling water. slice orange. Prepare as for lemonad...
-Sweetening Acid Drinks. Part 3
Malted Milk And Currant Jelly, 85 Calories 1 tablespoon Horlick's Malted Milk. cup boiling water. 1 tablespoon currant jelly. cup cold water. Cracked ice. Mix the malted milk powder with ...
-Sweetening Acid Drinks. Part 4
Grape Juice ( cup = 120 Calories. ) Partially fill a small glass with crushed ice, and add Welch's Grape Juice and serve. Grape juice is a tonic food and a medicine for the sick and convales...
-Albuminous Beverages
When a large amount of nutriment is required the albuminized drinks are valuable. The egg is a fluid food until its albumin is coagulated by heat. Often the white of egg, dissolved in water or milk...
-Albuminous Beverages. Part 2
Beef Ego-Nog, 200 Calories 1 egg. Speck salt. 1 tablespoon sugar. cup hot beef broth. 1 tablespoon brandy. Beat the egg slightly, add the salt and sugar; add gradually the hot broth; add br...
-Albuminous Beverages. Part 3
Grape Juice And Ego, 270 Calories 1 egg. 1 tablespoon sugar. cup rich milk. cup Welch's Grape Juice. Beat yolk and white separately very light. To the yolk add milk, sugar and grape juice...
-Starchy Beverages
Starchy drinks consist of cereals or cereal products, cooked thoroughly in a large amount of water and strained before serving. Arrowroot, cornstarch, tapioca, rice and rice flour are nearly pure star...
-Starchy Beverages. Continued
Oatmeal Water, 50 Calories 1 tablespoon oatmeal. Speck salt. 1 tablespoon cold water. 1 quart boiling water. Mix oatmeal and cold water, add salt and stir into the boiling water. Boil three h...
-Miscellaneous Beverages. Tea - Coffee-Chocolate - Cocoa And Special Non-Nutritive Beverages Tea
Source The tea of commerce is prepared from the leaves of a shrub cultivated for this purpose in China, Japan, India, Ceylon, and other portions of Southern and Eastern Asia. Classes Of Tea ...
-Coffee
Source This beverage is prepared from the seeds of the coffee tree (Caffea arabica), which grows in many warm countries, though originally found in Arabia. The coffee berry is about the color and s...
-Chocolate And Cocoa
Source Cocoa and chocolate are commercially prepared from the seeds of the cocao tree, Theobroma cocao. The seeds (or beans) are contained in a pulpy fruit 7-12 inches long, 3-5 inches in diameter,...
-Tea
(Individual Rule). 1 teaspoon tea. 1 cup boiling water. Scald the teapot, which should be silver, crockery or granite ware, not tin. Put in the tea, add the freshly boiling water and let it infu...
-Coffee Made In The Percolater
Breakfast Coffee 2 tablespoons coffee. 1 cup cold water. After-Dinner Coffee Increase quantity of coffee to suit the taste. From the percolator take out the cup with its tube, fill the...
-Boiled Coffee
(To make seven cups of coffee.) 1 cup coffee. 6 cups boiling water. egg and shell. 1 cup cold water. Scald coffee pot. Wash egg, beat slightly and add crushed shell, coffee and one-half cup c...
-Filtered Coffee
(Individual Rule). 2 tablespoons finely ground coffee. cup boiling water. Place a piece of filter paper over a strainer and put the coffee in it. Hold the strainer over a hot coffee cup and...
-Cereal Coffee
(Two Cups). 4 tablespoons cereal coffee. 1/8 saltspoon butter. 1 pint cold water. Put the cereal into coffee pot; add cold water and butter, when it reaches the boiling point, boil 15 minutes...
-Special Non-Nutritive Beverages
Flaxseed Tea 1 tablespoon whole flaxseed. Lemon juice to taste. 2 cups cold water. Sugar. Wash flaxseed thoroughly, put it with the cold water in a saucepan, simmer one hour, add lemon juice ...
-Chapter IX. Animal Foods
The important foods derived from the animal kingdom are - Meat - Poultry and Game - Fish - Shell Fish - Eggs - Milk and Milk Products - Sweetbreads - Gelatin - Beef Preparations - Meat Broth and Jelli...
-Meat
The term meat includes the flesh of all animals used for food, as beef, veal, mutton, lamb, pork, poultry, game. Lean meat is almost a pure protein food. Composition Of Meat 1. Muscle fibers...
-Meat. Part 2
Effect Of Cooking Meat Proper cooking makes meat more digestible, as it softens the connective tissues, thus causing a separation of the muscular fibers, and enabling the digestive juices to act mo...
-Meat. Part 3
Beef Beef, is without doubt, the most valuable kind of meat; it is nutritious, of excellent flavor, and comparatively easy of digestion. Test For Good Beef The flesh is firm and fine grai...
-Cuts Of Meat
1 The methods of cutting sides of beef, veal, mutton, and pork into parts, and the terms used for the different cuts, as these parts are commonly called, vary in different localities. The diagrams s...
-Meat. Part 4
Energy Value Of Meat See Table, under names of meat, as Beef - Mutton -Lamb - Bacon - Ham, etc. See Table, page 64, for energy value of other ingredients. To Broil Steak Wipe, trim off...
-Meat. Part 5
Pan-Broiled Chops Chops are fairly good pan-broiled. The same principle is to be followed as in the cooking over coals - that is, a high degree of heat at first, to sear the outside before the juic...
-Poultry And Game
Poultry and game are generally classed together, poultry being applied to domesticated birds raised for their flesh or eggs or both. Wild birds are all classed as game. Digestibility Chicken may...
-Poultry And Game. Part 2
Dry Dressing For Stuffing, 1100 Calories 1 cup stale bread crumbs. 1/3 cup butter (not melted). Salt, pepper. Powdered sage, marjoram, and summer savory. Thoroughly mix ingredients and seaso...
-Poultry And Game. Part 3
Broiled Quail 100 grams = 160 Calories. Clean, cut off the head and feet, singe, and wipe with a damp cloth. With a sharp-pointed knife split the quail down the back, beginning at back of neck and ...
-Fish
Fish is one of the important protein foods. The term is usually applied to all kinds of water animals used for food. They may be classified as follows: Classes 1. Scaly or Ve...
-Fish. Part 2
When Fish Are In Season Halibut, haddock, flounder and cod, are in season all the year. Turbot, October to May; shad, February to May; salmon, May to September; blue fish and mackerel, May to Oc...
-Fish. Part 3
Baked Fish Clean fish. Wipe with cloth wet in salted water, dry on a fish towel and bake on a greased fish sheet, placed in a dripping pan. A strip of cotton cloth, by which it may be lifted from t...
-Fish Sauces
Butter Cream , Cream a little butter; season with salt, cayenne, lemon juice (speck salt and pepper, one-half teaspoon lemon juice). Add finely minced parsley or chopped pickle, such as cucumber or...
-Shell-Fish. Oysters
Only the mollusks are considered in this book, because the crustaceans are not easily digested, and therefore are not suitable for an invalid diet. Oysters Oysters are valuable food for inva...
-Oysters. Part 2
Clams Clams are similar in composition to the oyster and same general rules followed in preparing and serving. They are much used for food and considered a great delicacy. They contain a tough port...
-Oysters. Part 3
Creamed Oysters, 284 Calories (Individual Rule). 8 oysters. 1 tablespoon butter. 1 tablespoon flour. cup rich milk or thin cream. Salt. White pepper. Wash, drain and dry oys...
-Clams
Clams Energy Value Of Clams dozen clams ......................=40 Calories. 3 1/3 ounces clam bouillon.............= 2 Calories. 1 quart clam bouillon ................= 23 Calories. See ...
-Eggs
Many kinds of eggs are eaten, but hens' eggs are the only ones necessary of consideration as a staple article of diet. The shell constitutes about 1.1 per cent. of the weight of the whole egg, the yol...
-Eggs. Part 2
Principles To Be Observed In Cooking The principal constituent of the egg is albumin, which should be cooked in such a manner as to require the least possible expenditure of force in digestion. Tho...
-Eggs. Part 3
Soft Cooked Eggs Wash one egg and put it in a small saucepan of boiling water to cover; remove to back of stove, or where the water will keep very hot, but not boil. Cook seven to ten minutes, acco...
-Eggs. Part 4
Foamy Omelet, 144 Calories 1 egg. 1 tablespoon milk. 2 teaspoons butter. saltspoon salt. Speck pepper. Separate egg and beat white to a stiff froth. Beat yolk till light, add milk, sa...
-Eggs. Part 5
Shirred Eggs Butter an egg shirrer, ramikins, or small earthen cups; put one egg in each without breaking yolk; dust with salt and white pepper, put in pan of hot water and cook on back of range or...
-Milk And Milk Products
Milk is the only substance in nature designed expressly for the nourishment of the young animal. It contains all the compounds necessary to support life, in remarkably good proportions and in very ass...
-Milk And Milk Products. Continued
Care Of Milk The importance of keeping milk clean cannot be over-emphasized. Aside from all esthetic considerations, absolute cleanliness is essential as a protection to health. Milk is an excellen...
-Milk Products
Butter Butter consists almost entirely of separated milk fat. Churning causes the fat globules to unite into a solid mass. The cream is first allowed to ripen for some hours. This process gives the...
-Milk Products. Part 2
Buttermilk True buttermilk, which is common on farms, is seldom found in commerce. Unless produced where sold, its genuineness may be a matter of question. Those who are familiar with the genuine a...
-Milk Products. Part 3
Malted Milk Malted Milk is a pure food prepared from rich full-cream milk, combined with the valuable nutritive extracts of malted barley and wheat. This product being highly concentrated and parti...
-Peptonised Milk Recipes
Peptonised Milk, 338 Calories. Warm Process Put one-half cup (gill) of cold water and the powder contained in one of the Peptonising Tubes (Fairchild) into a clean quart bottle and shake thoroughly...
-Milk Pasteurization
Methods Of Preparing Put bottle into kettle of cold water and slowly bring to the boiling point. Boil- ten minutes. After which fill immediately nearly full with milk; cork with absorbent cotton wh...
-Milk Recipes
Malted Milk, 59 Calories Mix one tablespoon of Horlick's Malted Milk powder with a little tepid water to make a smooth paste; add three-fourths cup water, hot or cold, stirring briskly and serve. ...
-Whey
6 ounces whey = 50 Calories. 1 cup fresh milk. 1 teaspoon cold water. Hansen's Junket Tablet. Heat the milk until lukewarm; add the tablet, dissolved in the cold water. Allow it to jelly in a...
-Kumyss
Kumyss, 328 Calories 1 cake Fleischmann's yeast. 1 tablespoon water. 1 tablespoons sugar. 1 quart milk. Make a thin syrup of the sugar and water and cook one minute. Soften the yeast in two ...
-Sweetbreads
Among epicures sweetbreads are considered a dainty and are certainly a most acceptable food for the sick, as they are easily digested, but they must not be used to excess on account of the large amoun...
-Gelatin
Source Gelatin is a nitrogenous food classed with proteins, under the division called gelatinoids or albuminoids, and derived from collagen, the chief constituent of connective tissue with its va...
-Jellies. Part 2
Wine Jelly No. I, 165 Calories (Individual Rule). 1 teaspoon granulated gelatin. 1 tablespoon cold water. cup boiling water. 2 tablespoons sugar. 2 tablespoons wine. 1 tablespoon o...
-Jellies. Part 3
Lemon Jelly, 142 Calories (Individual Rule). 1 teaspoon granulated gelatin. 1 tablespoon cold water. cup boiling water. 2 tablespoons lemon juice. 2 tablespoons sugar. Soak gelatin in th...
-Jellies. Part 4
Panopepton Jelly, 242 Calories (Three Servings). 1 ounce fresh celery (cut in small pieces). small box best gelatin. teaspoon salt. 2 dashes pepper. 6 tablespoons Panopepton. 2 cups...
-Jellies. Part 5
Spanish Cream, 303 Calories (Individual Rule). 1 teaspoon granulated gelatin. 1 tablespoon cold water. 3 tablespoons boiling water. % cup milk. Yolk 1 egg. 2 tablespoons sugar. Speck salt. Wh...
-Beef Preparations - Beef Juice - Beef Tea - Raw Beef - Beef Juice
Composition The juice of meat contains considerable protein, in addition to salts and extractives. General Principles In Cooking From raw meat we cannot obtain as much juice as is easily take...
-Beef Preparations - Beef Juice - Beef Tea - Raw Beef - Beef Juice. Continued
Raw Beef Uncooked Meat Raw meat is not quite as easily digested as cooked meat, and owing to color and flavor is not appetizing, and could not be taken continuously. However, when chopped fine, ...
-Broth And Meat Jellies
Broth is a liquid containing the juices of soluble parts of meat and bone, which have been extracted by long, slow cooking. This liquid is more or less solid when cold, according to the gelatinous ...
-Broth And Meat Jellies. Continued
Beef Broth Prepared same as Mutton Broth. Broth With Grains 1 quart hot broth. 1 tablespoon rice or barley. To the hot broth add the well-washed rice. Simmer slowly until the rice is t...
-Meat Jellies
Calf's Foot Jelly 100 grams = 65 Calories. 1 calf's foot. 1 quart cold water. 3 cups sherry wine (best Topaz). Juice of one lemon. Rind of lemon (yellow part only). cup cut or cu...
-Soup And Soup Accompaniments
Soup is a light and suitable form of food for the sick. There are two classes - those made with meat and those without meat. The soups with meat are an infusion of meat, flavored with salt and some...
-Soups. Part 2
Cream Of Celery Soto (For The Diabetic), 226 Calories (Three Servings). 6 stalks celery. 1 slice onion. 1 cup water. 1 cup hot milk. Speck cayenne pepper, salt. teaspoon butter....
-Soups. Part 3
Cream Of Tomato Soup (For The Diabetic), 224 Calories (Two Servings). cup tomatoes. 1 slice onion. 1 cup milk. teaspoon butter. teaspoon Gum Gluten Flour. Salt, pepper. Stew an...
-Chapter X. Vegetable Or Plant Foods
The important food products derived from the vegetable kingdom are the Cereals, Legumes - Roots and Tubers -Green Vegetables - Fruits - Nuts - Fungi - Lichens. Composition Vegetable or plant foo...
-Cereals. Gruels - Breakfast Foods - Starchy Jellies - Macaroni
Wherever it is possible to grow grains, they are staples of man's diet. No food products of the vegetable kingdom equal them in importance. They are cheaply and easily grown, and contain all the food ...
-Principles In Cooking Cereals
Cooking improves cereals in many ways. For the average person, proper cooking has almost as much to do with the nutriment finally obtained as the proportions of nutrients originally present. Flavor an...
-Gruels
Arrowroot Gruel, 205 Calories (Individual Rule.) 2 teaspoons arrowroot. 1 cup boiling water or milk. 2 tablespoons cold water. Salt. Sugar, lemon juice, wine or brandy as required. Blend t...
-Gruels. Continued
Farina Gruel, 102 Calories (Individual Rule). tablespoon farina. cup cold water. cup boiling water. V, cup scalded milk. Salt. Mix the farina with the cold water, add to the boiling ...
-Breakfast Foods
Fruits served with breakfast foods make them more appetizing. Follow directions on package for preparing patent or prepared cereals, allowing double the given time for cooking. Hasty Pudding...
-Starchy Jellies
Barley Jelly, 270 Calories (Three Servings). 3 tablespoons pearl barley. saltspoon salt. 1 quart cold water. Soak barley over night, drain and add the quart of fresh water; add salt; and co...
-Macaroni
Boiled Macaroni, 98 Calories (Individual Rule.) cup macaroni. 1 teaspoon salt. 3 cups boiling water. Cream or milk. Break macaroni into one-inch pieces, put into a strainer and rinse with, ...
-Bread
From the most remote times, bread has been an important part of the diet of mankind. It is to-day probably more generally and extensively used than any other one food-stuff, with the possible exceptio...
-Bread. Part 2
Gluten Bread When, for any reason, persons are denied starch in the diet, as in diabetes, they find it a great privation to do without bread, and many attempts have been made to provide an acceptab...
-Bread. Part 3
Unfermented Bread Carbon dioxide is obtained to lighten bread by causing cream of tartar and bicarbonate of soda to unite chemically. To one part soda use two parts cream of tartar. When given m...
-Bread. Part 4
Bran Bread Follow rule for Gluten Bread, using one part of bran to four parts of Gluten Flour with one cup of moisture. If the bran is increased the moisture must be lessened. Boston Brown B...
-Toasts
In ordinary wheat bread, starch is the principal constituent. Starch when subjected to a high degree of heat is changed into an easily digested substance called dextrin. In the ordinary cooking of ...
-Toasts. Continued
Water Toast Toast the bread. Dip quickly in boiling salted water (allowing one-half teaspoon salt to one cup water). Spread with butter. Serve on hot plate. Toasted Crackers 1 Saltine=15 Calo...
-Sandwiches
To Prepare Sandwiches Use white, entire wheat, graham, gluten or Boston brown bread. Bread may be buttered before cutting from loaf, spread with soft, plain butter cut into very thin slices, cover ...
-Crackers
Wafers Bran Crackers, 1513 Calories 1 cups wheat bran. 1 cups sifted flour. 1 teaspoon cream of tartar. teaspoon soda. teaspoon salt. 4 tablespoons butter. Milk. Blend all ingredients, ...
-Wafers
Gluten Wafers (For The Diabetic) cup thick cream = 432 Calories. 1 saltspoon salt. Gum Gluten Flour (1 cup = 513 Calories). Add salt to the cream and add the Gluten gradually to make a stif...
-Vegetables - Vegetable Sauces. Legumes - Roots And Tubers - Green Vegetables
Vegetables include nearly all kinds of plant food except fruits, grains and nuts. Classification Vegetables are classified as -Legumes - as peas, beans and lentils. Roots and Tubers - as potatoe...
-Roots And Tubers
Boots and tubers contain the reserve material stored up by the plant, and some of them are among the important food-stuffs. Their nutritive value is largely due to starch and sugar. On account of the ...
-Green Vegetables
These vegetables have a fuel value of less than 200 calories per pound; they are useful chiefly for their mineral salts, and for the bulk, variety and relish they give to the diet. Asparagus is eas...
-Potatoes
Energy Value of The Potato 1 medium potato (3 ozs.) =83 Calories. See Table, page 64, for energy value of other ingredients. Boiled Potatoes Select potatoes of uniform size. Wash, pare ...
-Asparagus
bunch asparagus..................=60 Calories. 1 slice toast (1 oz.)..................=73 Calories. Boiled Asparagus Prepare asparagus by cutting off lower part of stalk at the point at...
-Carrots
1 small carrot (2 ozs.) =20 Calories. Boiled Carrots Wash, scrub and scrape off the very thin skin. Cut each carrot into slices from one-fourth to one-fifth inch thick, cut into cubes and co...
-Cauliflower
1 serving (4 ozs.) =35 Calories. Boiled Cauliflower. Cut off stalk and remove leaves of cauliflower. Soak thirty minutes in cold water to cover, head down. Cook, head up, twenty to thirty minutes, or ...
-Onions
1 serving (4 ozs.) =56 Calories. Boiled Onions Put onions into pan of cold water and peel under water. Put them into boiling water with one teaspoon salt and one-fourth teaspoon soda to one ...
-Peas (Green Or Canned)
1 serving (4 ozs.) = 114 Calories. Green Peas. Remove peas from pods, cover with cold water and let stand one-half hour. Skim off small peas that come to the top and drain remaining peas. Cook until s...
-Tomatoes
Stewed Tomatoes 1 medium tomato ...................= 16 Calories. 1 cup canned tomato..................=51 Calories. Canned or fresh tomatoes may be used. To prepare fresh tomatoes wash, pour...
-Vegetable Sauces
Cream Or White Sauce No. I, 152 Calories Use to pour over any vegetable. (Individual Rule). cup milk or thin cream. tablespoon butter. tablespoon flour. saltspoon salt. Speck white...
-Salads And Salad Dressings
The salad plants, such as lettuce, celery, water cress, endives, etc., contain little nutriment, but are especially rich in mineral matter, and served uncooked in the form of salad, all this mineral m...
-Salads And Salad Dressings. Continued
Cream Dressing, 1697 Calories (For Fruit Salads). cup butter. 2 tablespoons flour. 1 cup scalded milk. 3 yolks of eggs. 3 whites of eggs. 1 teaspoon mustard. 1 tablespoon cider vin...
-Fruits
Fruits are the seed-bearing portions of plants. Some products of this class, such as melons, are sometimes called fruits and sometimes vegetables; and a few vegetable products which are not fruits in ...
-Fruits. Part 2
Precautions In The Use Of Fruit Over-ripe or unripe fruit should not be eaten raw; besides inferior flavor there is danger of digestive disturbance. Before serving, all fruit should be thoroughl...
-Fruits. Part 3
Orange Sunflower Wash the orange. Put a three-tined fork into the stem end. Cut off each end down to pulp, leaving the stem end on fork, then pare off rind to pulp, cut out each section and place o...
-Nuts
Nuts enter but little into the invalid's dietary, but as more attention is being paid to means of rendering them digestible, a word concerning them is not out of place. Composition The edible su...
-Fungi And Algae
These substances have little nutritive value. They may be considered as food adjuncts, rather than foods proper. Of fungi, mushrooms are the most commonly eaten. They are prized for their delicate ...
-Chapter XI. Nutritious Desserts
Hot And Cold Desserts -Frozen Desserts, Soft Custards, Baked Custards, Whips And Souffles, Junket, Cornstarch Puddings Or Blanc Mange, Rice, Tapioca, Cracker And Bread Puddings, Sauces. Properly pr...
-Soft Custards
Soft Custard No. I, 192 Calories (Individual Rule). Yolk 1 egg. Speck salt. 1 tablespoon sugar. cup milk. Scald milk in double boiler. Beat yolk, add salt and sugar and pour on gradually...
-Baked Custards
Bared Or Cup Custard, 319 Calories (Individual Rule.) 1 cup milk. 1 tablespoon sugar. 1 egg. saltspoon salt. Flavoring to taste - nutmeg, cinnamon, vanilla, or lemon extract. Scald the ...
-Whips And Souffles
Dainty and nutritious ways to serve the uncooked and slightly cooked white of eggs. Fruit Whip, 125-150 Calories (Two Servings). Any fruit, fresh, canned or dried (properly prepared), or ...
-Junket
Junket is a healthful and dainty dessert made simply of pure milk, and containing enough of the active principle of rennet found in the Junket Tablet to coagulate the milk. It is nutritious and has th...
-Cornstarch Pudding Or Blanc Mange
Starch of various kinds is used in milk puddings. For children, invalids and dyspeptics such puddings are admirable. They must be thoroughly cooked, that the action of the heat may affect the starch. ...
-Rice Puddings
Boiled Rice, 100 Calories (Individual Rule). 2 tablespoons rice. 2 cups boiling water. teaspoon salt. Wash rice thoroughly and add gradually to the boiling salted water, care being taken...
-Peaches And Rice
Serve boiled or steamed rice with sections of fresh, juicy peaches, or with fresh berries. Serve with sugar and cream. Southern Snowballs, 367 Calories (Individual Rule.) cup rice. teasp...
-Tapioca Puddings
Tapioca Cream, 483 Calories (Two Servings). 1 tablespoons Minute tapioca. 3 tablespoons sugar. saltspoon salt. 1 cup scalded milk. 1 egg. Flavoring. Scald milk in double boiler. Mix tap...
-Bread Puddings
The principle of employing farinaceous matter which has already been subjected to heat (so that a considerable conversion of starch has gone on before the human salivary diastase comes into play) is c...
-Jelly Bread Pudding
Prepare the same as for Lemon Bread Pudding, omitting the lemon rind and juice. Spread any tart jelly over pudding when baked and add meringue. Chocolate Bread Pudding, 904 Calories (Two Ser...
-Cracker Puddings
Cracker Pudding, 397 Calories (Two Servings). 1 soda crackers. 1 cup milk. 1/8 teaspoon salt. Yolk 1 egg. 2 tablespoons sugar. Boll the crackers and soak in the milk. Beat yolks ...
-Pudding Sauces
Hard Sauce, 650 Calories (Four Servings). 3 tablespoons butter. 6 tablespoons powdered sugar. Nutmeg. white of egg. tablespoon cream. Cream butter; add sugar gradually. When l...
-Frozen Dessert. Ice Cream - Sherbet - Ices
Frozen dishes not only constitute an acceptable form of serving nutriment, but often are a means of furnishing additional liquid and relieving thirst. Ices and sherbets made with fruits and water, hav...
-Ice Cream
Vanilla Ice Cream, 310 Calories (Individual Rule). cup thin cream or cup heavy cream and cup milk. 1 tablespoons sugar. teaspoon vanilla. Speck salt. Blend all the ingredients; wh...
-Ice Cream. Continued
Peach Ice Cream, 390 Calories (Individual Rule). cup thin cream or cup heavy cream and cup milk. cup peaches. 2 tablespoons sugar. Mix peaches and sugar and press through a pota...
-Sherbet
Lemon Milk Sherbet, 299 Calories (Individual Rule). cup milk. cup sugar. Juice of lemon. 1 drop lemon extract. Blend all the ingredients and freeze in small pail according to general...
-Ices
Orange Ice, 252 Calories (Individual Rule). cup water. 1 tablespoon lemon juice juice 1 oranges. cup sugar. Mix together all the ingredients and freeze in small pail according to general...
-Chapter XII. Cake
The two methods of making cake light are by means of air and of gas. Air is introduced by beating, or by the addition of beaten eggs, as in sponge cake. When the lightness is entirely dependent upon a...
-Marguerite Wafers
Take Long Branch wafer crackers and spread with plain-boiled frosting, or add nuts, chocolate, cocoanut, etc. Put in oven a moment to dry, but not brown. Dainty to serve with Ice Cream, Ices and She...
-Part III. Hospital Dietaries, Diet In Disease, Diet In Special Conditions. Chapter XIII. Hospital Dietaries
General Types Of Diet Used In Hospitals. Liquid Or Fluid Foods Acid, starchy and miscellaneous drinks. Raw eggs in the form of all albuminous drinks. Milk in different ways as given in recipes unde...
-Hospital Dietaries. Part 2
Liquid Or Fabinaceous 4 Cereals, bread, jellies, liquids, ice cream, custard, blanc-mange, puddings (without raisins), chicken. 1 Diet used at Nathan Littauer Hospital, Gloversville, New York. ...
-Hospital Dietaries. Part 3
Strict Sugar-Free Diet Massachusetts General Hospital 1 See Diabetic Diet. Page 357. Special Fat-Free Diet Breakfast Lean meat, 100 gms.; toasted bread, 50 gms.; coffee with a little...
-Hospital Dietaries. Part 4
Restricted Diet Breakfast Tea or coffee (with milk and sugar). Farinaceous food (with milk). Eggs. Dinner Soup; raw oysters, roast beef, steak or chicken and vegetables. Pudding (bread, ri...
-Hospital Dietaries. Part 5
Convalescent Diet Breakfast Tea or coffee (milk and sugar). Bread and butter. White bread or Graham bread or corn bread or rolls or toast. Porridge: Hominy or farina. Meats: Eggs or fresh ...
-Chapter XIV. Diet In Disease
One of the most striking differences between the older and more recent methods of treatment of disease is the careful attention bestowed upon the diet at the present day. For it is now recognized that...
-Diet In Fevers And Infectious Diseases Diet In Fever In General
In fevers due to poisons circulating in the blood, there is an interference with heat regulation, so that the heat generated in the body cannot be gotten rid of in the normal way; an increased metabol...
-Diet In Convalescence Ferom Fever. Thompson
Convalescents who have long subsisted solely upon fluids must be careful in resuming solid diet, for the rapidity of recuperation of the digestive organs varies in different persons, and taking meats ...
-Diet In Typhoid Fever
The modern dietetics of typhoid may be conveniently considered under three plans of feeding as follows: 1. Starvation Treatment Of Typhoid This ancient method of feeding or omitting to feed ...
-Diet In Typhoid Fever. Part 2
3. Liberal Or Generous Diet This in its widest sense is doubtless the only sound routine plan, for it permits the use of semi-solid food if the patient can take it and digest it. It allows consider...
-Diet In Typhoid Fever. Part 3
Liquid Diet In Typhoid Fever In the ordinary case, two and a half pints of milk and a pint and a half of beef, mutton or chicken broth will be a fair average supply, given in divided quantities, al...
-Diet In Typhoid Fever. Part 4
Diet In Typhoid After Two Days Of Normal Temperature First Day Chicken broth thickened with thoroughly boiled rice. Milk toast or cream toast once only during the day. Beef juice. Second D...
-Diet In Tonsilitis And Qwinsy Thompson 1. Dietetic Treatment
These diseases require no special care in the acute stage, beyond giving food in such fluid form as can be most easily swallowed. The pain caused by this act is often so extreme that it is advisable t...
-Diet In Diphtheria. Thompson 1. Dietetic Treatment
Alimentation occupies the first place in the general treatment (Trousseau). Throughout the active stage of the disease, while the fever lasts, there is difficulty in swallowing. All food must be giv...
-Diet In Pneumonia. Thompson 1. Dietetic Treatment
The indications for treatment are to give a light diet, which will not excite the cough in swallowing, or increase dyspnoea by distention of the stomach, or augment the enfeeblement of the heart actio...
-Diet In Broncho-Pneumonia. Thompson 1. Dietetic Treatment
Broncho-pneumonia is always a very critical disease, and the utmost care is required in nursing and feeding. The diet should consist of such articles as meat juice, predigested milk, and egg albumin. ...
-Diet In Mumps. Thompson
For mumps no special diet is required, beyond the necessity of giving fluids or soft food while the swelling of the parotid glands and fever last. The suggestions for the dietetic treatment of tonsili...
-Diet In Whooping Cough
Thompson 1 In whooping cough the paroxysms of coughing are so severe as to give rise to vomiting, and in bad cases they are excited by taking food which does not have an opportunity to become assimila...
-Diet In Tuberculosis, Especially Pulmonary Consumption
Before we learned of the contagious character of this affection, and its dependence on the tubercle bacillus, it was the custom to regard tuberculosis as a disease of nutrition, curable only by abunda...
-Chapter XV. Diet In Disorders Of Nutrition. Diet In Diabetes
It is commonly believed that diabetes should be managed dietetically by a sugar-and-starch-free regimen, carried to such a degree that excess of sugar no longer appears in the urine. As a matter of fa...
-Diet In Diabetes. Part 2
Diabetic Diet Of Bellevue Hospital Meat Fat beef, mutton, ham and bacon. Fish Fresh fish, salted codfish, canned salmon, sardines, oysters and clams. Farinaceous Gluten bread and bis...
-Diet In Diabetes. Part 3
Chronic Diabetes Diet Diet. Soups Soups or broth of beef, chicken, mutton, veal, oysters, clams, terrapin or turtle (not thickened with any farinaceous substances), beef tea. Fish Shel...
-Diet In Diabetes. Part 4
Outline Of Chart (Left Half) No. Name Present Address Permanent Address Date Vol. Sp. Gr. ...
-Diet In Diabetes. Part 5
Menus For The Diabetic. Summer Sunday. Breakfast Gluten Breakfast Food, Scalloped Eggs, Gluten Muffins, Coffee. Dinner Asparagus Soup, Fricassee Chicken and Dumpling, Creamed Gree...
-Diet In Diabetes. Part 6
Winter Sunday. Breakfast Gluten Breakfast Food, Scrambled Eggs, Gluten Toast, Coffee. Dinner Oysters, Cream Celery Soup, Gum Gluten Bread Sticks, Roast Beef, Spinach, Brussels Sprout...
-Diet In Lithemia Or Excess Of Uric Acid
Treatment For Uric Acid Exercise in the open air -walk - plenty of fresh air by night as well as by day. Breathe deeply. Bathe often; rub the body thoroughly afterward; the skin should play an impo...
-Diet In Acute Gout
Dietetic Treatment During acute attacks the diet must be restricted, but the extent of restriction will depend upon age, habits and conditions of the patient. Meat and alcohol as a rule are excl...
-Diet In Chronic Gout
Diet: Soups Clear vegetable broths, fresh fish soup. Fish Fresh fish broiled or boiled, raw oysters. Meats Eat of all kinds sparingly, game, chicken, fat bacon. Farinaceous Cracke...
-Diet In Acute Rheumatism. Thompson
Dietetic Treatment While the fever lasts and other symptoms are acute, such as pain and swelling of the joints, the patient should be put upon a fluid diet. The majority of cases do best at this ti...
-Diet In Rheumatism. Massachusetts General Hospital
Diet Graham or brown bread, white bread limited ( slice daily), corn, granum, rice, milk, eggs, flour, puddings, crackers, beans, peas, all kinds of vegetables (except potatoes and cooked tomatoes...
-Diet In Obesity
This is one of the most important features of dietetic therapy, and is older and better known than any other, probably because of its connection with conditioning athletes for all kinds of contests an...
-Chapter XVI. Diet In Diseases Of The Stomach. Gastritis
Acute Gastritis. Einhorn During the first or second day of illness it is best not to give the patient anything substantial to eat. Strained barley or rice water, or weak tea may be taken. On the th...
-Diet In Ulcer Of The Stomach. Einhorn
The diet consists of liquids - milk, milk with strained barley, or oatmeal, or rice water; plain water, weak tea and peptone (one teaspoon to a cup of water). Debove and Remond have suggested the addi...
-Gastric Ulcer Diet. Massachusetts General Hospital
1. Dr. Hewes's Diet For Gastric And Duodenal Ulcer Two oz. milk, 1 soda cracker (powdered), 1 oz. sugar, every two hours. Give two to three days, then increase to 6-8 oz. milk, 1-2 oz. sugar, 4 sod...
-Chapter XVII. Diet In Intestinal Diseases. Diet In Dyspepsia
Modern clinical medicine does not recognize such a disease as dyspepsia. In a great variety of local and general conditions digestion is more or less disordered. It may be too rapid, too slow, difficu...
-Diet In Constipation
It is almost as difficult to prescribe a diet for constipation as it is for dyspepsia, and for the same reason, namely, constipation is not in itself a disease, but a symptom or result of many disease...
-Diet In Diarrhoea
The term diarrhoea, like dyspepsia and constipation, represents only a symptom or result of various diseases. While this affection cannot be cured by a dietetic plan alone, certain foods are known to ...
-Diet In Dysentery. Thompson
During an attack of acute dysentery the patient should be kept absolutely quiet in bed, and should not be allowed to rise for the movement of the bowels, making use of a bedpan instead. Throughout the...
-Enteric Diet
Dr. Vickery 1 Milk, strained gruels, broths and strained soups, milk whey, buttermilk, slips, eggs (soft cooked or raw), milk flavored occasionally with tea or coffee, barley water, albumin water, bee...
-Diet In Appendicitis. Thompson
Dietetic Treatment The dietetic treatment of appendicitis, which has not yet passed into the surgeon's hands, should consist in giving only such foods as will be thoroughly absorbed, leaving as lit...
-Chapter XVIII. Diet In Diseases Of The Genito-Urinary System. Diet In Acute Bright's Disease
In dieting a patient suffering from acute Bright's disease, one fact to be kept prominently in mind is the difficulty that the system has in getting rid of its waste material - especially of it...
-Diet In Chronic Bright's Disease
The kidneys are great agents in the work of excreting nitrogenous waste, and if these organs become clogged with accumulation of nitrogenous waste products they are not able to perform their functions...
-Nephritic Diet. Massachusetts General Hospital
Bread, soft puddings without eggs, all vegetables, except peas and beans, fruits of all kinds, gruels and broths. Avoid Meat, eggs, peas, beans. Diet For Acute Nephritis, Uric Acid Gravel...
-Diet In Albuminuria. Thompson
Dietetic Treatment The frequent return of functional albuminuria should be regarded as an indication of special weakness of the kidneys in the same way that frequent glycosuria invites suspicion of...
-Chapter XIX. Diet In Miscellaneous Affections. Nervous Disorders
Dietetic Treatment The first thing to be done for a person suffering from nerve exhaustion is to adopt a dietary and a habit of life that will rebuild the nerve cells. The lost energy must be gentl...
-Diet In Functional Disorders of The Liver (Biliousness)
Diet: Soups Light broths, vegetable soups, with crackers or a little toasted bread. Fish Broiled or boiled fresh white flesh fish, raw oysters. Meats Eat very sparingly of lean mutton, ...
-Diet In Skin Diseases
Nearly all affections of the skin of constitutional or reflex (gastro-intestinal) origin, especially acne, eczema, psoriasis, seborrhoea capitis, pruritus, urticaria, etc., improve under dietetic meas...
-Diet In Heart Disease
In disease of the heart which has passed the period of compensatory activity, so that the organ is no longer able to discharge its functions perfectly, it is highly important that the stomach be not o...
-Dietetic Management Of Surgical Cases
Not much special attention is paid to dietetics until a day or two before operation, with the exception of stomach cases. Whenever a patient is to be operated on for a stomach affection, many surgeons...
-Chapter XX. Diet In Special Conditions. Motherhood. Diet In Pregnancy. Thompson
It is not customary to adopt any definite system of diet for pregnancy unless complications arise. If serious vomiting occurs in the early months, this should be treated in the manner described in fol...
-Diet In Vomiting - Seasickness - Vomiting Of Pregnancy. Thompson
The first principle in the dietetic treatment of vomiting from any cause is to give the stomach rest. If it has been overloaded with a large bulk of food, or with indigestible material, it is well to ...
-Diet For The Mother After Labor
Society of the lying-in Hospital, New York City 1 Immediately after labor in a normal case milk diet is given for the first six hours; at the end of that time regular diet. In abnormal cases the diet ...
-Diet Of A Nursing Mother Or Wet Nurse. Thompson
The diet of the nursing mother or wet nurse must be regulated to prevent noxious substances from passing into the breast milk, and to keep her in good health, so that she does not suffer from constipa...
-Chapter XXI. Infant Feeding
General Considerations Infants may be fed naturally, artificially or by a combination of both methods. When the child is at the breast of its own mother or another nursing woman, there is no indica...
-Infant Feeding. Part 2
Composition Of Mother's Milk It is often advisable to collect enough milk with the breast pump to permit of an analysis. Milk within normal limits should average fat, 4 per cent.; carbohydrates (mi...
-Infant Feeding. Part 3
Schedule For Nursing Up to two months of age the baby will normally demand the breast about ten times in twenty-four hours, or roughly speaking, every two hours, day and night. After the second ...
-General Principles Of Milk Modifications
It must be constantly borne in mind that anything but mother's milk is a foreign substance in the stomach of the child, and even to make a mixture agreeing in chemical composition with the natural foo...
-The Nursing Bottle
The tube bottles should never, under any consideration, be used. No matter how carefully these tubes and outfits are washed, small particles of milk will remain in the tiny crevices and cause inflamma...
-Formulae For Infant Feeding
Many systems for percentage feeding of infants have been evolved. One of the simplest is the top milk method. The cream is allowed to rise. The upper third of the bottle containing practically all the...
-Formulae For Infant Feeding. Part 2
The tables given below are sufficiently accurate for home modification, provided the fat percentage of the whole milk is known. From 4 Per Cent. Milk To secure approximately a 10% fat,...
-Formulae For Infant Feeding. Part 3
Formulas In Which The Fat Is Twice The Proteids Here we first obtain a combination, or primary formula, in which the fat and proteids stand in the relation of two to one, and then dilute this, addi...
-Formulae For Infant Feeding. Part 4
Table For Estimation Of Fat Percentages In Cream To determine the fat percentage of the cream: One quart of whole milk, of 4% fat, will yield on an average, approximately : Cream 10% fat in uppe...
-Formulae For Infant Feeding. Part 5
Table III. Method Of Calculating Whey Mixtures From The Card The percentages of fats, proteids, and lime-water are calculated by the card. Three-fourths () of the proteid in the formula chosen wil...
-Formulae For Infant Feeding. Part 6
To Estimate The Caloric Value Of Food Taken Example : An infant takes 6 feedings of 210 c.c each of Formula 25, the caloric value of which is 720. The caloric value of the food ingested is, then, 2...
-Formulae For Infant Feeding. Scheme For Feeding Babies
Society of the Lying-in Hospital, New York City 1. First Day Give from nursing bottles 30 C.C. (1 ounce) of 6 per cent, sugar water every 3 hours, from 6:45 P. M. to 9:45 p. m., inclusive, and i...
-Peptogenic Milk Powder Modifies Cow's Milk
By a physiological process, makes the casein of cows' milk soluble and digestible like the proteins of mothers' milk, and gives a food for infants which behaves in the stomach like the food that Natur...
-Chapter XXII. The Feeding Of Young Children
Whether the child be fed at the breast or with the bottle, the period from the tenth to the fifteenth month is usually one of transition. For the breast-fed baby it is often more critical than for the...
-The Feeding Of Young Children. Continued
General Rules For Feeding Young Children. Thompson 1. Allow time for meals. 2. See that the food is thoroughly masticated. 3. Do not allow nibbling between meals. 4. Do not tempt the child...
-Dietaries For Young Children
Starr 1. Diet From The Twelfth To The Eighteenth Month 7 A. M., stale bread soaked in a breakfast cup of new milk. 10 a. M., milk, six ounces, and soda biscuit, or a thin slice of buttered b...
-General Principles Of Feeding Sick Children
Since this work has been chiefly devoted, as the title implies, to the relationship between diet and disease, the amount of space given to the feeding of presumably normal children may occasion some w...
-Diet In Diarrhoea In Children
Under this familiar term, which includes the mildest looseness of the bowels as well as the severest symptoms of cholera and dysentery, may be included the greater part of the morbidity of the nurslin...
-Chapter XXIII. Diet For The Adolescent - The Sedentary - The Aged. Diet For The Adolescent
The growing youth needs extra protein food for the building of protoplasm and a sufficiency of salts for the rapidly-forming tissues; earthy salts for bones, iron for blood, phosphorus for nervous tis...
-Diet For The Sedentary
No exact rules can be laid down for the dietetics of the sedentary. An individual may lead a technically sedentary life, and yet use up a great amount of energy, only standing and walking muscles bein...
-Diet For The Aged
As there is a radical distinction between a person merely old in years and one who is actually senile, no dietary can be devised to suit the case of all those of advanced years. A man is technically o...







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