Some years since the base of trunk paints was pure white lead in the lighter colors, but at the present time, this material is mostly sold at ruinous prices and its make-up is almost on a par with barrel paints. Yet there are still some makers of trunks, who although buying cheaper material, than their predecessors did years ago, prefer fair quality goods at moderate prices, to the very poor grades very often offered. There are two kinds used, one to dry flat to permit varnishing over, while some are wanted to dry with gloss over a priming of glue size. To make a flat drying trunk paint in buff color mix and grind:

15 pounds red seal lithopone;

50 "

gilder's bolted whiting;

15 "

yellow ochre;

20 "

boiled linseed oil;

10 "

gloss oil;

100 pounds paste.

Thin with 2 gallons benzine. Result 8 1/2 gallons.

For an olive green trunk paint, also flat drying, mix and grind:

20 pounds yellow ochre;

2 "

C. P. chrome green, medium;

1 "

lampblack, dry;

5 "

American zinc oxide;

10 "

asbestine powder;

35 "

gilder's bolted whiting;

13 "

boiled linseed oil;

14 "

gloss oil;

100 pounds paste.

Thin with 3 gallons benzine. Result 10 1/2 gallons.

When part of the gloss oil in the pastes can be replaced by varnish foots, it will make the paints dry more quickly and insure hardness, but the varnish foots must be fairly liquid and not consist of hard sediment only.

To make trunk paints dry with gloss finish, use the same paste as above. However, do not thin with benzine, but instead reduce it with a quick drying mixing varnish of fair toughness and elasticity.

Note. The trunk paints here referred to are for the canvas covered traveling trunks, and as there are a good many different colors, it is hardly necessary to describe formulas at length, because every large trunk factory has its own standards, that require to be matched. It is not necessary to use imported oxides, ochers, siennas and umbers in this class of paint, unless the trunk manufacturer is willing to pay for high class goods.