Paragraph 19. The chamfer is a very important feature in a great many lines of mechanical work. You should learn to make a chamfer accurately. To do this a chamfer must be carefully gauged. This gauging should be done with a lead pencil and ruler or with a lead pencil and finger, as already shown in Figure 25, if you are able to do this accurately. After the gauging is done the board should be clamped in the vise and planed to the gauge lines. In planing the end grain the block plane will be found most convenient, although if you have no block plane the larger plane may be successfully used if you do it carefully. Planing with a block plane is shown in Figure 36. Notice that the plane is held at an angle, but that it is pushed straight across the board (not an upward motion). Thus it makes what is called a "shirring cut." This causes the plane to cut smoothly. The fingers on the left hand rest against the board as the plane slides along, and thus enable one to hold it at a constant angle. If the block plane is pushed entirely across the board in cutting the chamfer, care must be exercised not to tear out splinters of the farther edge of the board. This splintering process can usually be avoided by chamfering the ends first and making the side chamfer later, or by planing part way across from one edge and the remainder from the opposite edge. When a chamfer is well formed its edges should be sharp and straight, and should not have a rounded appearance.

Figure 36.

Figure 36.