Bassano, a town of Italy, province of Pia-cenza, on the left bank of the Brenta, 31 m. N. by W. of Padua and 15 N. E. of Vicenza; pop. about 13,000. The fine bridge over the Brenta built by Palladio was swept away in 1748, and restored by Ferracino. The old walls of Bassano are clad with ivy; the sidewalks are paved with marble found in the vicinity, and the streets with granite and other materials. The partly ruined castle of Ezzelino in the centre of the town is now occupied by the archbishop.

Bassano.

Bassano.

The museum in the piazza San Francisco contains an extensive library, a picture gallery, and collections of coins and rare engravings. The palace of the podesta contains frescoes and statuary. Near the town are the villa Rez-zonico, famous for its extensive view and for works of art, and the villa Parolini, with a botanical garden. The town contains a number of convents, a gymnasium, and about 30 churches, several of which have paintings executed by the Bassano family. The Remondini printing establishment, once the first in Italy, is still of some importance, and has paper mills and a school of engraving annexed to it. The trade is considerable, especially in silks. The chief manufactures are woollen cloths, straw hats, and leather. Ezzelino resided here for some time. The town was fortified and improved by Francis of Carrara, lord of Padua, and was ruled by the Visconti of Milan, who in 1404 ceded it to the republic of Venice, of which it became a separate province with a local administration. In the 16th century it suffered during the Avar of the league of Cam-bray against Venice. On Sept. 8, 1796, Napoleon, after a forced march of two days from Trent, annihilated here the Austrian army under Wurmser. Battles were also fought here between the French and the Austrians in November, 1796, in 1801, 1805, and 1813. Napoleon raised Bassano to a duchy for the benefit of Maret. Canova was born in a village 10 m. from Bassano.